Thailand national football team

The Thailand national football team (Thai: ฟุตบอลทีมชาติไทย, RTGSfutbon thim chat thai, pronounced [fút.bɔ̄n tʰīːm t͡ɕʰâːt tʰāj]) represents Thailand in senior international football and is controlled by the Football Association of Thailand.

Thailand
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)ช้างศึก (Changsuek)
(War elephants)
AssociationFA Thailand
ConfederationAFC (Asia)
Sub-confederationAFF (Southeast Asia)
Head coachAlexandré Pölking
CaptainChanathip Songkrasin
Most capsKiatisuk Senamuang (134)
Top scorerKiatisuk Senamuang (71)
Home stadiumRajamangala Stadium
FIFA codeTHA
First colours
Second colours
Third colours
FIFA ranking
Current 111 Steady (6 October 2022)[1]
Highest43 (September 1998)
Lowest165 (October 2014)
First international
 Thailand 7–0 Republic of China 
(Bangkok, Thailand; 20 August 1948)[2]
Biggest win
 Thailand 11–0 Brunei 
(Bangkok, Thailand; 25 May 1971)
Biggest defeat
 Great Britain 9–0 Thailand 
(Melbourne, Australia; 30 November 1956)
Asian Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1972)
Best resultThird place (1972)
AFF Championship
Appearances13 (first in 1996)
Best resultChampions (1996, 2000, 2002, 2014, 2016, 2020)

In the regional competition, Thailand is the most successful football team in Southeast Asia with six AFF Championship trophies and nine senior-level gold medals from the Southeast Asian Games, the most of any Southeast Asian country. In higher levels, Thailand achieved the third place in the 1972 AFC Asian Cup where it was the host, and has totally seven appearances in the AFC Asian Cup so far. Furthermore, the team reached the fourth-place in the 1990 and 1998 Asian Games and participated in the Summer Olympics twice. However, Thailand has failed to obtain higher achievements in the continental and global records.[4] The team obtained first ever win in the AFC Asian Cup in 2007 and had to wait 47 years to finally sneak out of the group stage in 2019.[5] Thailand also advanced to the final round of World Cup qualification twice, in 2002 and 2018, but all failed to qualify for the FIFA World Cup.

HistoryEdit

1915–1995: dynastic establishmentEdit

 
King Vajiravudh, the founder of the Football Association of Thailand
 
Siam association football squad's pioneers.

The team's predecessor, which operated under the name of Siam, was founded in 1915 and played its first unofficial match against a team of Europeans at the Royal Bangkok Sports Club Stadium on 20 December that year. The team played its first international match in 1930 against the Indochina national team, which included both South Vietnamese and French players.[6]

 
Thailand football members at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics before their biggest defeat by the United Kingdom.

Thailand appeared in the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, where they've lost to Great Britain 0–9 is largest till date, thus failed to advance to the quarter-finals. In 1965, Thailand harbored its first distinct title: the very first place in the Southeast Asian Games. They made their second and latest appearance at the Summer Olympics in 1968, losing all three matches by at least 3 goals margin to Bulgaria, Guatemala, and Czechoslovakia hence en route to a first-round exit.[7]

During the 1992 AFC Asian Cup qualification, Thailand gained a significant success defeating South Korea 2–1 and Bangladesh 1–0 to top the group and qualify to the 1992 AFC Asian Cup. The team's performance at the final tournament was drawing first two matches with Qatar and eventual 3rd place China then losing 0–4 to Saudi Arabia. In 1994, manager Thawatchai Sartjakul assembled a team that has been denounced as the "dream team" with players like Kiatisuk Senamuang, Tawan Sripan and Dusit Chalermsan.[8]

1996–2016: flag bearer of Southeast AsiaEdit

 
A welcome banner at Rajamangala Stadium, venue for the 2007 Group A AFC Asian Cup matches.

In 1996, Thailand defeated Malaysia 1–0 and win the ASEAN Football Championship (then called the Tiger Cup) for the first time. Thailand were favorites to regain the crown in 2007, 2008 and 2012 only to lose tight finals to Singapore and Vietnam respectively.[9]

The regional 1998 Tiger Cup saw Thailand met Indonesia in a match that ill-hearted players from both team deliberately making actions aimed to avoid facing hosts Vietnam in the semi-finals and undergoing technical burden of moving training bases from Ho Chi Minh City to Hanoi.[10] FIFA fined both teams $40,000 for "violating the spirit of the game". Thailand eventually lost the match, inevitably encountered and failed to Vietnam in the semi-finals.

Thailand consecutively qualified to and participated in two AFC Asian Cup final tournaments both held within Western Asia in 1996 and 2000 when their "dream team" was beginning its golden period. Coincidentally in both editions, the team's opponents all came from Western Asia and they are Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Iran and Iraq, with the latter two share the same group with Thailand twice. In both editions, Thailand made two draws and lost the rest, bottomed the group stage of the first and is the worst third-placed team of the second edition.[11]

The final 2000 AFF Championship match between Thailand and Indonesia, at a sold out Rajamangala, was almost a carbon copy of their group stage's encounter. The War Elephants triumphed 4–1 again with Worrawoot setting up camp at the opponents' goal. The 28-year-old scored twice in their first match and in the final struck a hat-trick in the first 32 minutes.[13] In the final 2002 AFF final, Thailand again met Indonesia (who was now the host) and was hold draw despite taking a 2–0 lead and won the game in the penalty shootout.[14]

Thailand again qualified to the Asian Cup in 2004 and was put into a group with Japan, Iran and debutant Oman. Despite vast experiences in the Asian Cup, the team has yet to show a sign of improvement as they lost all matches and became the worst-performed team in the whole tournament.

The sign of improving only came in the 2007 AFC Asian Cup when Thailand participated as a well-prepared co-host and was placed with the debutant Australia, Oman and Iraq. The team manages a draw to Iraq and a historic win over Oman. With 4 points ahead, Thailand's chance to qualify to the next round for the first time since 1972 was all but shattered by the likes of Australia in a 0–4 demolition. The tournament witnessed the end of Thailand's recognizable generation with later retirements of Kiatisuk, Tawan and Pipat.[15]

In September 2008, Thailand signed a four-year contract with the English coach Peter Reid[16] but Reid left his position by mutual consent after only a year in charge[17] as his team fail to clinch the championship of 2008 AFF Championship after 2–3 on aggregate lost to Vietnam in the finals.

In September 2009, Bryan Robson agreed to coach Thailand in his first foray into international football management[18] and was contracted to manage the team through to the 2014 World Cup. In November, Robson celebrated his first competitive match in charge of the team with an away victory against Singapore in a 2011 Asian Cup qualifying group match[19] but then lose to the same opponent back home. Then, two goalless draws with Jordan and Iran in January 2010 and an 0–1 away lost to Iran in March all effectively ended the chance of qualifying for the 2011 AFC Asian Cup. In preparations for the 2010 AFF Championship, Robson led Thailand to victorious run against Singapore and Bob Houghton's India in a series of friendlies. However, when entering the tournament in December, he failed to bring Thailand past group A after managing only draws against Laos and Malaysia and losing to Indonesia.

Robson resigned as Thailand's manager on 8 June 2011, citing health problems as the reason and was replaced by Winfried Schäfer, who would be the ninth German person to coach the Thailand team.

The new coach called up starlets for the 2014 World Cup qualifiers and have the starting set of matches losing minimal to Australia, defeating Oman 3–0 and drawing Saudi Arabia but did not make it after losing to these teams altogether in the second set. In the 2012 AFF Championship, Thailand topped their group and surpassed Malaysia in semi-finals but handed the crown to Singapore in the finals. In the 2015 Asian Cup qualification, Thailand showed setback with its defensive frailties exposed by Middle Eastern rivals (Iran, Kuwait, Lebanon) when losing all 6 games in the qualifiers, conceding 21 goals in the process.

In June 2013, Schäfer cancelled his contract. The FA of Thailand appointed the former player Kiatisuk Senamuang as the new caretaker coach for the national team. His first ride was a friendly against China PR on 15 June, which Thailand surprisingly won 5–1.[20]

 
Thailand team celebrated after winning the 2014 AFF Suzuki Cup at Bukit Jalil, Malaysia.

In 2014, Thailand ended a 12-year drought of the AFF Championship title from the late goals by Charyl Chappuis and Chanathip Songkrasin which gave them a dramatic 4–3 aggregate victory over Malaysia in the second leg of the finals at Bukit Jalil. The team did not lose any match up until the second leg of the finals and often featured a tiki-taka playing style, for instance including 27 consecutive passes during the first leg of the finals against Malaysia.[22] Kiatisuk consequently became the first person to win the ASEAN Football Championship as both a player and a coach. Thailand succeeded in protecting AFF Championship reign two years later in 2016, defeating Indonesia 3–2 aggregately despite losing the first leg.

In 2015, evasion fuelled hope for both the players and Thailand fans of finally reaching the World Cup tournament and tension is mounting as the national team commenced AFC's second round for 2018 World Cup qualification.[23][24] Teerasil Dangda, Thailand's renowned striker, rejoined the rank of the national team after his loan with UD Almería ended earlier. Drawn in Group F along with Chinese Taipei, Iraq and Vietnam, who Thailand played first match home against on 24 May and can only be won by a victory goal from a shot 20 yards away. They played a much easier match at the same opponent's home soil, winning 3–0. Thailand won both matches against Chinese Taipei and drew 2–2 both matches against Iraq, allowing them to qualify for the next round as group F winners.[25] In the last round, Kiatisuk's men shared the same group with Australia, Japan, Saudi Arabia, UAE along with previous opponent, Iraq. Again, Thailand was eliminated without winning a match and recorded only two points out of ten matches.

2017–present: Rebuilding to achieve the continental successEdit

Since taking over the administration by Somyot Poompanmoung, FA Thailand aims to drive men's national football team to be one of the leading teams in Asia by which there are concrete 20 years development plans and preparations.[26] After the elimination from World Cup qualifiers, Kiatisuk resigned and Thailand appointed Milovan Rajevac as a coach, thus marked the first non-Brazilian/German/English team's chief. With the new coach, however, Thailand failed to defend its AFF Championship title in 2018 when losing Malaysia in the semi-finals by the away goals rule.

Ahead of 2019 AFC Asian Cup, Thailand was drawn into group A together with the host UAE, Bahrain and India. Rajevac oversaw Thailand in the commencing 1–4 loss to India. The Serbian coach was sacked and his assistant, Sirisak Yodyardthai became the interim coach on 7 January. Sirisak guided Thailand to a 1–0 win over Bahrain and a 1–1 draw with the host UAE, enough to move on to the knockout stage of the AFC Asian Cup for the first time in 47 years. Their success was greeted with congratulation from the FA.[27] Thailand encountered China in the round of sixteen, taking an early lead but eventually lost 2–1 as China make their decisive respond.

After finishing in the fourth place of 2019 King's Cup and losing the rival Vietnam in that tournament, Sirisak had resigned and FA Thailand appointed the Japanese coach Akira Nishino, who had brought Japan to the round of 16 of 2018 FIFA World Cup, for replacement. This was the first-ever Asian coach becoming Thailand's head coach. The team was drawn into group G of the second round of 2022 World Cup qualification with other three Southeast Asian rivals: Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia; along with the UAE. Despite defeating Indonesia 3-0 and the UAE 2–1, Thailand failed to revenge Vietnam when getting goalless draws in both legs, while losing Malaysia 1–2 in Bukit Jalil. With these results, Thailand could only get the third place in group G after five qualifying matches. After a one-year disruption due to COVID-19 pandemic, Thailand and other teams in group G had to play their remaining matches in Dubai, UAE. However, the team suffered a huge loss of key players when Chanathip Songkrasin was injured, while Teerasil Dangda and Theerathon Bunmathan refused to participate the qualification due to various reasons. Without these three players, Thailand showed a poor performance in Dubai - drawn the bottom place team Indonesia 2-2, then lost the UAE 1-3 and Malaysia 0–1, respectively; which eventually pushed the team down to the fourth place of the group G. Nishino did not come back to Thailand to explain the team's failure, but unilaterally returning to Japan, which made FA Thailand appoint Anurak Srikerd as the caretaker and consider sacking Nishino in upcoming days. On July 29, 2021, shortly after Nishino came back to Thailand, FA Thailand decided to terminate the contract with Nishino.[29]

On 28 September 2021, Alexandré Pölking had been appointed as the head coach of the Thai national team, replacing Akira Nishino. Pölking's first task was the 2020 AFF Championship in December 2021.[30] Between 5 December 2021 and 1 January 2022, Polking accomplished the very task as he managed the War Elephants to win 6–2 on aggregate after being held to 2–2 second-leg draw by Indonesia's Garuda, guiding Thailand to win the AFF Championship for the sixth time.[31]

ImageEdit

ColoursEdit

 
Vintage 1968 Summer Olympics shirt.

In older days, the primary kits worn are all red.

The Thai senior national team used to play with a kit made by local provider FBT. This contract lasted until June 2007.

In July 2007, Nike became kit providers, and from October that year, the team played in an all-yellow home kit in honour of King Bhumibol Adulyadej's 80th birthday (yellow being the royal color), having used two other yellow kits in friendlies against China on 16 May 2007[32] and Qatar on 2 July 2007.[33]

From October 2012 through 2016, Nike was replaced by Grand Sport in a deal worth 96M baht (3.1M USD).[34] The new home kit of Thailand reverted to all-red and the away kit to all-blue. However, the order was reversed from the 2014 AFF Championship onward.

In September 2016, the national team signed a four-year contract with Warrix Sports to be their kit provider from 2017.[35] On 4 January 2017, the new provider introduced a new pair of Thailand kits that was all black home and all white away, honouring their late King Bhumibol for a year after his passing, with black and white being the traditional Thai colors of mourning.

In March 2018, Warrix returned Thailand to the all-blue first, all-red second kits with an addition of a white-black third kit.[36]

In December 2018, a new, darker version of blue, red kits and an all white third kit were presented for the 2019 AFC Asian Cup campaign and the rest of 2019. For the 2019 King's Cup in May, Warrix released the kit consisting of a yellow shirt with white shorts and socks – yellow reportedly being the favorite color of the newly crowned King Maha Vajiralongkorn.

RivalriesEdit

Notable rivalriesEdit

Thailand has rivalries with Myanmar, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and Vietnam. These rivalries are rooted in geographical proximity.

Opponent GP W D L GF GA GD Win % Details
  Malaysia 97 29 31 37 136 140 −4 029.90
  Indonesia 69 33 18 18 121 82 +39 047.83
  Singapore 62 33 17 12 107 62 +45 053.23
  Myanmar 48 20 14 14 89 62 +27 041.67 Matches
  South Vietnam 27 4 3 20 27 58 −31 014.81 Matches
  Vietnam 26 15 8 3 45 19 +26 057.69 Matches

Thailand's greatest rival is Malaysia because the most competitive number of 97 matches between two team, Before Malaysia fell into football scandal that weakened the country's football development from the 1990s to 2018, Malaysia was Thailand's most annoying and difficult opponent in the region. On every away games to Malaysia since 1990 still, the Thais have never been able to beat the Malaysians at their turf.[37] Nonetheless, Thailand holds overall higher records in international football competitions compared to the Malaysians. , Thailand's overall record is not favorable with only 29 wins, 31 draws and 37 losses to the Malayan Tigers.[38]

The rivalry between Thailand and Singapore is a newer one and its importance can be emphasized by the domination of both countries in the AFF Championship with Thailand winning five times and Singapore winning four. Up until 2012, Singapore and Thailand have been the more dominant forces in Southeast Asian football.[39] Thailand has a decided head-to-head advantage on Singapore, beating the Singaporeans 33 times, drawing 17 times and losing 12 times.[40] Football development in both countries have been different with Thailand relies mostly on its own domestically developed players while Singapore has been reliant on naturalized players.

Thailand's rivalry with Vietnam has developed differently from times. During the time of South Vietnam and North Vietnam, Thailand had a poorer performance with the team only won 4 matches against the South Vietnamese.[41] However, when Vietnam rejoined international football at 1991, Thailand has been more dominant than their eastern rival, winning 14 matches.

When Myanmar was still a football power, it was Thailand's first-ever rival, owning by the history of the Burmese–Siamese wars which led to a nationalist fervor among Thai fans with its desire to beat the Burmese.[42] But with Myanmar weakened following the reign of Ne Win and junta, Thailand improved and since 1983, holds an undefeated streak over its western rival. The rivalry today only serves mostly in the memoir of Burmese fans who are nostalgic to an era when Myanmar was still a leading football power, while for some Thai fans, they have more important opponents to concentrate at.[43] Thailand has 21 wins, 14 draws and 15 losses to Myanmar.

Indonesia has met Thailand in three finals of the AFF Championship at 2000, 2002 and 2016, and Thailand all triumphed at the expense of Indonesia.[44] It's been said that while Thailand was able to elevate its position to become a more serious Asian competitor, Indonesia fell into mismanagement and matches between two teams also began to lose its importance. Thailand has a decided edge in head-to-head matchups against Indonesia, with 33 wins and 18 losses and 18 draws.[45]

FacilitiesEdit

Most home matches took place in Rajamangala National Stadium in Bang Kapi District of Bangkok. Built for the 1998 Asian Games, the stadium is the largest sporting facility in Thailand with a capacity of 49,749, all seated. International matches are also occasionally played at Supachalasai Stadium, 700th Anniversary Stadium, 80th Birthday Stadium, Thammasat Stadium, Chang Arena and SCG Stadium.

Home stadiums list
Image Stadium Capacity Location Last match
  700th Anniversary Stadium 25,000 Amphoe Mueang, Chiang Mai v    Trinidad and Tobago
(25 September 2022; 2022 King's Cup)
  BG Stadium 16,014 Thanyaburi, Pathum Thani v    Bahrain
(31 May 2022; Friendly match)
Sisaket Provincial Stadium 15,000 Amphoe Mueang, Sisaket v    Turkmenistan
(27 May 2022; Friendly match)
  Chonburi Stadium 8,680 Amphoe Mueang, Chonburi v      Nepal
(24 March 2022; Friendly match)
  Thammasat Stadium 25,000 Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani v    United Arab Emirates
(15 October 2019; 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification)
  Chang Arena 32,600 Amphoe Mueang, Buriram v    India
(8 June 2019; 2019 King's Cup)
  Rajamangala Stadium 49,722 Bang Kapi, Bangkok v    Malaysia
(5 December 2018; 2018 AFF Championship)
  Suphan Buri Provincial Stadium 15,000 Amphoe Mueang, Suphan Buri v    Trinidad and Tobago
(14 October 2018; Friendly match)
  SCG Stadium 15,000 Pak Kret, Nonthaburi v    Kenya
(8 October 2017; Friendly match)
  Supachalasai Stadium 19,793 Pathum Wan, Bangkok v    South Korea
(27 March 2016; Friendly match)
  80th Birthday Stadium 20,141 Amphoe Mueang, Nakhon Ratchasima v    Singapore
(26 March 2015; Friendly match)
  Surakul Stadium 15,000 Amphoe Mueang, Phuket v    Denmark
(23 January 2009; 2009 King's Cup)
  Tinsulanon Stadium 45,000 Amphoe Mueang, Songkhla v    China
(19 December 1998; 1998 Asian Games)

FixturesEdit

Fixtures are broadcast by Thairath TV (for friendlies and round 2 of FIFA World Cup - AFC qualification matches) and Channel 7 (for the AFF Suzuki Cup, possible round 3 of FIFA World Cup - AFC qualification and AFC Asian Cup matches, due to broadcasting contract with Lagardère Sports and Entertainment).

  Win   Draw   Loss

2021Edit

5 December 2021 AFF GS Timor-Leste   0–2   Thailand Kallang, Singapore
17:30 UTC+8 Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
  • Pathompol   51'
  • Supachok   81'
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 2,432
Referee: Qasim Al-Hatmi (Oman)
11 December 2021 AFF GS Thailand   4–0   Myanmar Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8
Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 1,142
Referee: Shukri Hussain Al-Alhunfush (Saudi Arabia)
14 December 2021 AFF GS Philippines   1–2   Thailand Kallang, Singapore
17:30 UTC+8
Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 2,559
Referee: Qasim Al-Hatmi (Oman)
18 December 2021 AFF GS Thailand   2–0   Singapore Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8
Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 9,540
Referee: Ahmad Yacoub Ibrahim (Jordan)
23 December 2021 AFF SF Vietnam   0–2   Thailand Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8 Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Chanathip   14', 23' Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 7,355
Referee: Saoud Ali Al-Adba (Qatar)
26 December 2021 AFF SF Thailand   0–0   Vietnam Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8 Report (AFFSZ)
Report (AFF)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 8,121
Referee: Ahmad Yacoub Ibrahim (Jordan)
29 December 2021 AFF Final Indonesia   0–4   Thailand Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8 Report (AFFSZ)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 6,290
Referee: Shukri Hussain Al-Alhunfush (Saudi Arabia)

2022Edit

1 January 2022 AFF Final Thailand   2–2   Indonesia Kallang, Singapore
20:30 UTC+8
Report (AFFSZ)
Stadium: National Stadium
Attendance: 7,429
Referee: Ahmed Faisal Al-Ali (Jordan)
24 March 2022 Friendly Thailand   2–0     Nepal Chonburi, Thailand
19:00 UTC+7
Report Stadium: Chonburi Stadium
Referee: Torpong Somsingha (Thailand)
27 March 2022 Friendly Thailand   1–0   Suriname Pathum Thani, Thailand
19:00 UTC+7
Report Stadium: BG Stadium
Referee: Warintorn Sassadee (Thailand)
27 May 2022 Friendly Thailand   1–0   Turkmenistan Sisaket, Thailand
17:30 UTC+7
Report Stadium: Sisaket Provincial Stadium
Attendance: 16,614
Referee: Warintorn Sassadee (Thailand)
31 May 2022 Friendly Thailand   1–2   Bahrain Pathum Thani, Thailand
19:00 UTC+7
Report
  • Al-Khatal   45+1'
  • Isa   90+1'
Stadium: BG Stadium
Attendance: 4,622
8 June 2022 Asian Cup Q Thailand   3–0   Maldives Namangan, Uzbekistan
17:00 UTC+5
Report Stadium: Markaziy Stadium
Attendance: 1,100
Referee: Mohammad Arafah (Jordan)
11 June 2022 Asian Cup Q Sri Lanka   0–2   Thailand Namangan, Uzbekistan
17:00 UTC+5 Report
Stadium: Markaziy Stadium
Attendance: 570
Referee: Khaled Al-Shaqsi (Oman)
14 June 2022 Asian Cup Q Uzbekistan   2–0   Thailand Namangan, Uzbekistan
20:30 UTC+5
Report Stadium: Markaziy Stadium
Attendance: 21,405
Referee: Hasan Akrami (Iran)
22 September 2022 2022 King's Cup Thailand   1–1
(3–5 p)
  Malaysia Chiang Mai, Thailand
20:30 UTC+7
Report
Stadium: 700th Anniversary Stadium
Attendance: 16,219
Referee: Muhammaq Taqi (Singapore)
Penalties
25 September 2022 2022 King's Cup Trinidad and Tobago   1–2   Thailand Chiang Mai, Thailand
17:30 UTC+7
Report
Stadium: 700th Anniversary Stadium
Attendance: 12,212
Referee: Muhammaq Taqi (Singapore)
11 December 2022 Friendly Thailand   v   Myanmar Pathum Thani, Thailand
20:30 UTC+7 Stadium: Thammasat Stadium
20 December 2022 AFF GS Brunei   v   Thailand Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
--:--  Stadium: Kuala Lumpur Stadium
26 December 2022 AFF GS Thailand   v   Philippines Pathum Thani, Thailand
--:--  Stadium: Thammasat Stadium
29 December 2022 AFF GS Indonesia   v   Thailand Bekasi, Indonesia
--:--  Stadium: Patriot Candrabhaga Stadium

2023Edit

4 January 2023 AFF GS Thailand   v   Cambodia Pathum Thani, Thailand
--:--  Stadium: Thammasat Stadium

2024Edit

January 2024 Asian Cup GS TBD v   Thailand Qatar
--:--  Stadium: TBA
January 2024 Asian Cup GS Thailand   v TBD Qatar
--:--  Stadium: TBA
January 2024 Asian Cup GS TBD v   Thailand Qatar
--:--  Stadium: TBA

Coaching staffEdit

As of 28 September 2021
Name Role
Technical Director   Carles Romangosa
General Manager   Nualphan Lamsam
Head Coach     Alexandré Pölking
Assistant Coach   Wasapol Kaewpaluk
  Nuengrutai Srathongvian
Goalkeeper Coach   Umarin Yaodam
Fitness Coach   Yohei Shiraki
Video Analyst   Luís Viegas
Team Doctor   Dr. Keerati Surakan
  Dr. Ekaphop Piansuset
Physiotherapist   Panuwat Chutichotlimsakul
  Radapak Raweethanawed
  Suwitcha Nordee
Technical Consultant   Anan Amornkiat
  Jadet Meelarp

Coaching historyEdit

Manager historyEdit

As of 25 September 2022 after the match against   Trinidad and Tobago.
Manager Period Record
Matches Won Draw Lost Win % Honours
  Peter Reid 2008–2009 17 9 4 4 52.94%
  Bryan Robson 2009–2011 15 6 4 5 40.00%
  Winfried Schäfer 2011–2013 28 14 6 8 50.00%
  Kiatisuk Senamuang 2014–2017 42 21 7 14 50.00% 2014 AFF Championship
2016 AFF Championship
2016 King's Cup
  Milovan Rajevac 2017–2019 20 8 7 5 40.00% 2017 King's Cup
  Sirisak Yodyardthai (caretaker) 2019 7 2 1 4 28.57%
  Akira Nishino 2019–2021 11 2 5 4 18.18%
  Alexandré Pölking 2021–present 17 12 3 2 70.58% 2020 AFF Championship
Manager Period Record
Matches Won Draw Lost Win % Honours

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following 23 players were called up for the 2022 King's Cup.

Caps and goals as of 25 September 2022, after the match against Trinidad and Tobago.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Kampol Pathomakkakul (1992-07-29) 29 July 1992 (age 30) 2 0   Ratchaburi
20 1GK Kittipong Phuthawchueak (1989-09-26) 26 September 1989 (age 33) 2 0   BG Pathum United

3 2DF Theerathon Bunmathan (1990-02-06) 6 February 1990 (age 32) 74 6   Buriram United
15 2DF Narubadin Weerawatnodom (1994-07-12) 12 July 1994 (age 28) 38 2   Buriram United
4 2DF Pansa Hemviboon (1990-07-08) 8 July 1990 (age 32) 29 6   Buriram United
5 2DF Kritsada Kaman (1999-03-18) 18 March 1999 (age 23) 11 0   Chonburi
13 2DF Suphanan Bureerat (1993-10-10) 10 October 1993 (age 29) 4 0   Port
22 2DF Chalermsak Aukkee (1994-08-25) 25 August 1994 (age 28) 3 0   Police Tero
2 2DF Chatmongkol Rueangthanarot (2002-05-09) 9 May 2002 (age 20) 1 0   Chonburi

18 3MF Chanathip Songkrasin (captain) (1993-10-05) 5 October 1993 (age 29) 58 12   Kawasaki Frontale
8 3MF Thitiphan Puangchan (1993-09-01) 1 September 1993 (age 29) 51 7   Bangkok United
6 3MF Sumanya Purisai (1986-12-05) 5 December 1986 (age 35) 23 0   Chonburi
11 3MF Bordin Phala (1994-12-20) 20 December 1994 (age 27) 22 2   Port
10 3MF Jakkaphan Kaewprom (1988-05-24) 24 May 1988 (age 34) 21 2   Ratchaburi
16 3MF Phitiwat Sukjitthammakul (1995-02-01) 1 February 1995 (age 27) 21 0   BG Pathum United
7 3MF Supachok Sarachat (1998-05-22) 22 May 1998 (age 24) 20 6   Hokkaido Consadole Sapporo
14 3MF Pathompol Charoenrattanapirom (1994-04-21) 21 April 1994 (age 28) 14 1   BG Pathum United
12 3MF Weerathep Pomphan (1996-09-19) 19 September 1996 (age 26) 10 0   Muangthong United
19 3MF Picha Autra (1996-01-07) 7 January 1996 (age 26) 5 0   Muangthong United
23 3MF Channarong Promsrikaew (2001-04-17) 17 April 2001 (age 21) 1 1   Chonburi

9 4FW Supachai Chaided (1998-12-01) 1 December 1998 (age 23) 27 5   Buriram United
17 4FW Suphanat Mueanta (2002-08-02) 2 August 2002 (age 20) 10 3   Buriram United
21 4FW Teerasak Poeiphimai (2002-09-21) 21 September 2002 (age 20) 1 0   Port

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have been called up within the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Siwarak Tedsungnoen (1984-04-20) 20 April 1984 (age 38) 33 0   Buriram United v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
GK Kawin Thamsatchanan (1990-01-26) 26 January 1990 (age 32) 64 0   Muangthong United v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
GK Patiwat Khammai (1994-12-24) 24 December 1994 (age 27) 2 0   Bangkok United v.   Suriname, 27 March 2022
GK Chatchai Bootprom (1987-02-04) 4 February 1987 (age 35) 16 0   BG Pathum United 2020 AFF Championship

DF Tristan Do (1993-01-31) 31 January 1993 (age 29) 48 0   Bangkok United v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
DF Peerapat Notchaiya (1993-02-04) 4 February 1993 (age 29) 32 1   Bangkok United v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
DF Sasalak Haiprakhon (1996-01-08) 8 January 1996 (age 26) 14 0   Buriram United v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
DF Jakkapan Praisuwan (1994-08-16) 16 August 1994 (age 28) 3 0   BG Pathum United v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
DF Manuel Bihr (1993-09-17) 17 September 1993 (age 29) 18 0   Bangkok United v.   Suriname, 27 March 2022
DF Philip Roller (1994-06-10) 10 June 1994 (age 28) 17 2   Port v.   Suriname, 27 March 2022
DF Kevin Deeromram (1997-09-11) 11 September 1997 (age 25) 3 0   Port v.   Suriname, 27 March 2022
DF Elias Dolah (1993-04-24) 24 April 1993 (age 29) 6 1   Port 2020 AFF Championship
DF Suriya Singmui (1995-04-07) 7 April 1995 (age 27) 5 0   Chiangrai United 2020 AFF Championship
DF Pawee Tanthatemee (1996-10-22) 22 October 1996 (age 26) 4 0   Ratchaburi Mitr Phol 2020 AFF Championship
DF Jonathan Khemdee (2002-05-17) 17 May 2002 (age 20) 0 0   Næstved 2020 AFF Championship INJ

MF Sarach Yooyen (1992-05-30) 30 May 1992 (age 30) 59 2   BG Pathum United 2022 King's Cup INJ
MF Tanaboon Kesarat (1993-09-21) 21 September 1993 (age 29) 55 1   Port v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
MF Worachit Kanitsribampen (1997-08-24) 24 August 1997 (age 25) 12 2   BG Pathum United v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
MF Pakorn Prempak (1993-02-02) 2 February 1993 (age 29) 9 0   Port v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
MF Chaowat Veerachat (1996-06-23) 23 June 1996 (age 26) 5 1   BG Pathum United v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
MF Ekanit Panya (1999-10-21) 21 October 1999 (age 23) 8 1   Muangthong United 2023 AFC Asian Cup qualification PRE
MF Wisarut Imura (1997-10-18) 18 October 1997 (age 25) 2 0   Bangkok United Friendly Match May 2022 INJ
MF Lursan Thiamrat (1991-09-18) 18 September 1991 (age 31) 1 0   Nongbua Pitchaya v.   Suriname, 27 March 2022
MF Pokklaw Anan (1991-03-04) 4 March 1991 (age 31) 44 6   Bangkok United 2020 AFF Championship
MF Sivakorn Tiatrakul (1994-07-07) 7 July 1994 (age 28) 10 0   Chiangrai United 2020 AFF Championship
MF Thanawat Suengchitthawon (2000-01-08) 8 January 2000 (age 22) 9 0   Leicester City 2020 AFF Championship

FW Teerasil Dangda (1988-06-06) 6 June 1988 (age 34) 115 53   BG Pathum United v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
FW Adisak Kraisorn (1991-02-01) 1 February 1991 (age 31) 46 19   Port v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
FW Chayawat Srinawong (1993-01-12) 12 January 1993 (age 29) 4 0   Bangkok United v.   Uzbekistan, 14 June 2022
FW Janepob Phokhi (1996-04-04) 4 April 1996 (age 26) 1 0   Police Tero 2020 AFF Championship

INJ Withdrew from the squad due to injury
PRE Included in the Preliminary squad or on standby
RET Retired from the national team
SUS Serving suspension from the national team
WD Withdrew from the squad due to non-injury issue

Previous squadsEdit

Players recordEdit

As of 14 June 2022[46]
Players in bold are still active with Thailand.

Competitive recordEdit

FIFA World CupEdit

FIFA World Cup finals Qualification
Year Result Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1930 to   1970 Did not enter Did not enter
  1974 Did not qualify 4 0 0 4 0 13
  1978 4 1 0 3 8 12
  1982 3 0 1 2 3 13
  1986 6 1 2 3 4 4
  1990 6 1 0 5 2 14
  1994 8 4 0 4 13 7
  1998 4 1 1 2 5 6
   2002 14 5 5 4 25 20
  2006 6 2 1 3 9 10
  2010 10 3 2 5 20 17
  2014 8 2 2 4 7 10
  2018 16 4 4 8 20 30
  2022 8 2 3 3 9 9
      2026 To be determined To be determined
Total 0/22 97 26 21 50 125 165

Olympic GamesEdit

Olympic Games Qualification
Year Result Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1900 to   1952 Did not enter Did not enter
  1956 First round 11th 1 0 0 1 0 9 Bye
  1960 First round qualification 2 0 0 2 2 6
  1964 Second round qualification 4 2 0 2 4 10
  1968 Group stage 16th 3 0 0 3 1 19 4 3 0 1 5 6
  1972 Final round qualification 6 1 2 3 5 12
  1976 and   1980 Did not enter Did not enter
  1984 Second round qualification 10 5 2 3 13 8
  1988 8 3 2 3 8 7
Total First round 11th 4 0 0 4 1 28 33 14 6 14 37 49

AFC Asian CupEdit

AFC Asian Cup Qualification
Year Result Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D* L GF GA
  1956 Withdrew Withdrew
  1960
  1964 Did not qualify 3 0 1 2 4 9
  1968 4 2 0 2 5 4
  1972 Third place 3rd 5 0 3 2 6 9 5 3 1 1 16 4
  1976 Withdrew after qualifying 4 3 0 1 8 2
  1980 Did not qualify 6 4 0 2 13 4
  1984 5 3 0 2 9 10
  1988 5 1 2 2 5 12
  1992 Group stage 7th 3 0 2 1 1 5 2 2 0 0 3 1
  1996 Group stage 12th 3 0 0 3 2 13 6 4 2 0 31 5
  2000 Group stage 9th 3 0 2 1 2 4 6 4 1 1 13 8
  2004 Group stage 16th 3 0 0 3 1 9 6 3 0 3 10 7
        2007 Group stage 10th 3 1 1 1 3 5 Qualified as co-hosts
  2011 Did not qualify 6 1 3 2 3 3
  2015 6 0 0 6 7 21
  2019 Round of 16 14th 4 1 1 2 4 7 6 4 2 0 14 6
  2023 Qualified 11 4 3 4 14 11
Total Third place 3rd 24 2 9 13 19 52 79 36 15 28 150 107

Asian GamesEdit

AFF ChampionshipEdit

Southeast Asian GamesEdit

Notes
  • 1 : The title was shared.
  • * : Denotes draws including knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Head-to-head recordEdit

As of 25 September 2022[47][48]

Thailand national football team head-to-head records
Against First Last Pld W D L GF GA GD Confederation
  Afghanistan 2015 2015 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 AFC
  Australia 1982 2017 7 0 1 6 4 17 −13 AFC
  Bahrain 1980 2022 9 2 4 3 9 11 −2 AFC
  Bangladesh 1973 2012 14 9 3 2 29 11 +18 AFC
  Belarus 2017 2017 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 UEFA
  Bhutan 2012 2012 1 1 0 0 5 0 +5 AFC
  Brazil 2000 2000 1 0 0 1 0 7 −7 CONMEBOL
  Brunei 1971 1997 7 6 1 0 33 5 +28 AFC
  Bulgaria 1968 1996 2 0 0 2 0 13 −13 UEFA
  Cambodia 1957 1997 15 8 5 2 36 17 +19 AFC
  Cameroon 2015 2015 1 0 0 1 2 3 −1 CAF
  China 1975 2019 28 5 5 18 24 61 −37 AFC
  Chinese Taipei 1963 2015 9 4 1 4 16 16 0 AFC
  Congo 2019 2019 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 CAF
  Czech Republic 1968 1968 1 0 0 1 0 8 −8 UEFA
  Denmark 2009 2010 2 0 1 1 2 5 −3 UEFA
  Egypt 1998 1998 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 CAF
  Estonia 2000 2004 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1 UEFA
  Finland 1996 2000 4 3 1 0 11 3 +8 UEFA
  Gabon 2018 2018 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 CAF
  Germany 2004 2004 1 0 0 1 1 5 −4 UEFA
  Ghana 1982 1983 2 0 0 2 2 6 −4 CAF
  Guatemala 1968 1968 1 0 0 1 1 4 −3 CONCACAF
  Hong Kong 1961 2018 26 9 6 11 39 33 +6 AFC
  India 1962 2019 23 11 6 6 37 26 +11 AFC
  Indonesia 1957 2022 71 34 19 18 127 84 +43 AFC
  Iran 1972 2013 14 0 3 11 5 32 −27 AFC
  Iraq 1972 2017 17 2 5 10 18 45 −27 AFC
  Israel 1973 1973 1 0 0 1 0 6 −6 UEFA
  Japan 1962 2017 29 3 6 20 25 71 −46 AFC
  Jordan 2004 2016 7 1 5 1 4 3 +1 AFC
  Kazakhstan 1998 2006 4 2 2 0 5 3 +2 UEFA
  Kenya 1990 2017 2 2 0 0 3 1 +2 CAF
  Kuwait 1972 2014 12 4 1 7 18 30 −12 AFC
  Kyrgyzstan 2001 2001 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 AFC
  Laos 1961 2010 14 12 1 1 50 15 +35 AFC
  Latvia 2005 2005 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 UEFA
  Lebanon 1998 2014 7 3 2 2 12 15 −3 AFC
  Liberia 1984 1984 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 CAF
  Libya 1977 1977 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 CAF
  Liechtenstein 1981 1981 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 UEFA
  Luxembourg 1980 1980 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 UEFA
  Macau 2007 2007 2 2 0 0 13 2 +11 AFC
  Malaysia 1959 2022 113 33 38 42 151 162 −11 AFC
  Maldives 1996 2022 4 4 0 0 22 0 +22 AFC
  Malta 1981 1981 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2 UEFA
  Morocco 1980 1980 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 CAF
  Myanmar 1957 2021 49 21 14 14 93 62 +31 AFC
    Nepal 1982 2022 4 4 0 0 14 1 +13 AFC
  Netherlands 2007 2007 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 UEFA
  New Zealand 1976 2014 5 2 2 1 9 7 +2 OFC
  Nigeria 1983 1983 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 CAF
  Northern Ireland 1997 1997 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 UEFA
  North Korea 1978 2017 20 5 4 11 18 32 −14 AFC
  Norway 1965 2012 2 0 0 2 0 8 −8 UEFA
  Oman 1986 2021 12 5 1 6 11 10 1 AFC
  Pakistan 1960 2001 5 4 0 1 16 7 +9 AFC
  Palestine 2011 2011 2 1 1 0 3 2 +1 AFC
  Papua New Guinea 1984 1984 1 0 0 1 1 4 −3 OFC
  Philippines 1971 2021 22 18 2 2 67 11 +56 AFC
  Poland 2010 2010 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 UEFA
  Qatar 1992 2016 11 4 3 4 15 15 0 AFC
  Saudi Arabia 1982 2017 16 1 1 14 9 42 −33 AFC
  Singapore 1957 2021 63 34 17 12 109 62 +47 AFC
  Slovakia 2004 2018 2 0 1 1 3 4 –1 UEFA
  South Africa 2010 2010 1 0 0 1 0 4 −4 CAF
  South Korea 1961 2016 61 8 12 41 43 120 −77 AFC
  South Vietnam 1956 1975 27 4 3 20 27 58 −31 AFC
  Sri Lanka 1979 2022 6 6 0 0 17 2 +15 AFC
  Suriname 2022 2022 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 CONCACAF
  Sweden 1962 2003 5 0 1 4 4 13 −9 UEFA
  Syria 1978 2016 5 3 2 0 12 7 +5 AFC
  Tajikistan 2003 2021 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 AFC
  Timor-Leste 2004 2021 3 3 0 0 17 0 +17 AFC
  Trinidad and Tobago 2003 2022 3 3 0 0 6 3 +3 CONCACAF
  Turkey 1980 1980 1 0 0 1 0 2 –2 UEFA
  Turkmenistan 1998 2022 2 1 1 0 4 3 +1 AFC
  United Arab Emirates 1986 2021 12 2 3 7 12 19 −7 AFC
  United States 1987 1987 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 CONCACAF
  Uruguay 2019 2019 1 0 0 1 0 4 −4 CONMEBOL
  Uzbekistan 1994 2022 9 5 0 4 18 17 +1 AFC
  Vietnam 1995 2021 26 16 7 3 46 17 +29 AFC
  Yemen 1988 2007 6 2 4 0 9 5 +4 AFC
82 Countries 1948 2022 818 304 196 318 1245 1206 +39 All
Last match updated was against    Trinidad and Tobago on 25 September 2022.
 
Thailand national football team all-time opponents highlighted in green.

HonoursEdit

Continental titlesEdit

Regional titlesEdit

Friendly titlesEdit

Note
*trophy shared

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 6 October 2022. Retrieved 6 October 2022.
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  3. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 28 November 2022. Retrieved 28 November 2022.
  4. ^ Tifo Football (31 December 2018). Asian Cup 2019: Last Chance for Thailand? (6:22). YouTube. Archived from the original on 22 December 2021. Retrieved 20 July 2019.
  5. ^ "เปิดอันดับฟีฟ่าแรงกิ้งล่าสุด เบลเยียมที่ 1 โลก "ทีมชาติไทย" เป็นรองเวียดนาม (คลิป)". 21 February 2020.
  6. ^ Kenneth Perry Landon (1939). Siam in Transition: A Brief Survey of Cultural Trends in the Five Years Since the Revolution of 1932. University of Chicago Press. pp. 209–. ISBN 9780598977366.
  7. ^ "Thailand's 100-year football milestone". Bangkok Post.
  8. ^ "Asian Nations Cup 1992".
  9. ^ "AFF Championship – Tiger Cup 1996".
  10. ^ 1998 Tiger Cup Match Highlight
  11. ^ "FLASHBACK: 2000 ASEAN FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP".
  12. ^ "ASEAN ("Tiger") Cup 2000 (Thailand) (Full Info)". Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  13. ^ "Flashback: 2000 ASEAN Football Championship". Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  14. ^ "Flashback: 2002 ASEAN Football Championship". Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  15. ^ "Flashback: AFC Asian Cup 2007".
  16. ^ "Reid confirmed as Thailand boss". BBC Sport. 2 September 2008. Retrieved 2 September 2008.
  17. ^ "Reid named Stoke assistant boss". BBC Sport. 10 September 2009. Retrieved 10 September 2009.
  18. ^ "Bryan Robson to coach Thailand Bryan Robson has agreed to replace his former England team-mate Peter Reid as coach of Thailand". The Daily Telegraph. London. 23 September 2009. Archived from the original on 10 January 2022. Retrieved 27 April 2010.
  19. ^ "Singapore 1-3 Thailand: Sutee Suksomkit Gives Bryan Robson Crucial Win - Goal.com". goal.com. 14 November 2009. Retrieved 4 January 2017.
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  21. ^ "Thailand vs. Indonesia - Football Match Report - December 17, 2016 from espn.co.uk". Retrieved on 31 August 2017.
  22. ^ "บาร์ซาเข้าสิง! ชมอีกครั้งไทยติกิ-ตาก้าต่อบอล 27 ครั้งสุดเทพ". GOAL. Bangkok. 17 December 2014.
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  28. ^ "AFF SUZUKI CUP 2020".
  29. ^ "FA Thailand on Facebook". Facebook. Archived from the original on 30 April 2022.[user-generated source]
  30. ^ Polking appointed as national coach
  31. ^ Thailand capture sixth Suzuki Cup
  32. ^ "Thaifootball.com (Friendly Matches)". Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  33. ^ "Thailand footballers Suree Sukha (R) and... Pictures | Getty Images". Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  34. ^ "ASC2012: Thailand Go With Grand Sport - AFF - The Official Website Of The Asean Football Federation AFF – The Official Website Of The Asean Football Federation". www.aseanfootball.org.
  35. ^ PCL., Post Publishing. "Kirins eye three points from trip to Sukhothai". Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  36. ^ "Thailand 2018 Home and Away Kits Released". footyheadlines.com. 13 March 2018. Retrieved 11 April 2018.
  37. ^ "Thailand national football team: Record v Malaysia".
  38. ^ Maximus, Lucius (15 April 2014). HOW MALAYSIA NEVER REACHED THE WORLD CUP: Harimau Malaya's 40-Year Chronicle of Failure. ISBN 9789670374857.
  39. ^ "Soccer wars in Southeast Asia". 16 September 2015.
  40. ^ "Thailand national football team: Record v Singapore".
  41. ^ "Thailand national football team: Record v South%20Vietnam".
  42. ^ "The Fall of Siam & the Lost Temples of Ayutthaya - The Bohemian Blog". www.thebohemianblog.com. 25 January 2013.
  43. ^ Limited, Bangkok Post Public Company. "Confident Thailand take on Myanmar". Bangkok Post.
  44. ^ "PIALA AFF 2018: Thailand vs Indonesia, Ini Rekor Pertemuan, Berharap Tuah Evans Dimas | Bola". 17 November 2018.
  45. ^ "Thailand national football team: Record v Indonesia".
  46. ^ Mamrud, Roberto. "Thailand - Record International Players". RSSSF.
  47. ^ "Thailand national football team statistics and records: all-time record". AFS Enterprises Limited. Retrieved 21 November 2022.
  48. ^ "World Football Elo Ratings: Thailand". Elo Ratings. Retrieved 21 November 2022.

External linksEdit