The 2010 AFF Championship, sponsored by Suzuki and P&G and officially known as the 2010 AFF Suzuki Cup,[1] was the 8th edition of the AFF Championship, took place on 1–29 December 2010.[2] Indonesia and Vietnam hosted the group stage from 1 to 8 December. Two-legged home-and-away semi-finals and finals were held between 15 and 29 December 2010.[3]

2010 AFF Championship
Kejuaraan Sepak Bola ASEAN 2010
Giải vô địch bóng đá Đông Nam Á 2010
Tournament details
Host countryIndonesia
Vietnam
(for group stage)
Dates1–29 December
Teams8
Venue(s)4 (in 4 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Malaysia (1st title)
Runners-up Indonesia
Tournament statistics
Matches played18
Goals scored51 (2.83 per match)
Top scorer(s)Malaysia Safee Sali
(5 goals)
Best player(s)Indonesia Firman Utina
2008
2012

Vietnam were the defending champions, but were eliminated by Malaysia in the semi-finals. Indonesia appeared in their fourth final while the Philippines qualified for the semi-finals for the first time under the management of Simon McMenemy.[4] Malaysia subsequently won their first ever title since they first appeared in the final in the inaugural edition,[5] beating Indonesia 4–2 on aggregate in the finals. Malaysia became the first nation to win the AFF Cup (including tournaments held under earlier formats), despite losing two games in the tournament (both to Indonesia).

Hosts edit

On 17 February 2009, Vietnam declared their interest in hosting the group stage.[6] On 21 April 2009, the Vietnamese newspaper VietNamNet announced that Vietnam would co-host the group stage along with Indonesia.[7][8]

Venues edit

There were two main venues; the Gelora Bung Karno Stadium in Jakarta and the My Dinh National Stadium in Hanoi with two secondary venues which will be used simultaneously with the main venue on the final match day of the group stage. Originally, the secondary venue for Group B was the Hàng Đẫy Stadium in Hanoi. However, on 22 November 2010, the Vietnam Football Federation (VFF) announced that it would not be ready in time for the tournament due to ongoing renovations and was replaced by the Thiên Trường Stadium.[9] For Group A, the original secondary venue was the Si Jalak Harupat Stadium in Bandung but on 24 November 2010 a week after an AFF meeting, it was announced that it would be replaced with the Gelora Sriwijaya Stadium.[10][11] Teams qualifying for the semi-finals would also host a game, in this case, Malaysia whom qualified used their Bukit Jalil National Stadium for the semi-final and final.

Location of stadiums of the 2010 AFF Championship.
  Yellow: Group Stage.
  Red: Final.
  Jakarta   Palembang   Hanoi   Nam Dinh   Kuala Lumpur
Gelora Bung Karno Stadium Gelora Sriwijaya Stadium Mỹ Đình National Stadium Thiên Trường Stadium Bukit Jalil National Stadium
Capacity: 88,083 Capacity: 36,000 Capacity: 40,192 Capacity: 20,000 Capacity: 110,000
         

Qualification edit

 
  Qualified
  Failed to qualify
  Banned

Qualification took place from 22 to 26 October 2010 in Laos, with the four lower-ranked teams (Laos, Cambodia, the Philippines and Timor-Leste) battling for two spots to the finals.[3] However, the qualification tournament was held without Brunei due to FIFA's continued suspension of the Football Federation of Brunei Darussalam.[12]

Six teams qualified for the finals, based on tournament records:

Two teams qualified via the qualification tournament:

  •   Laos (Qualification winners)
  •   Philippines (Qualification runners-up)

Qualified teams edit

The following eight teams qualified for the tournament.

Country Previous best performance
  Vietnam Winners (2008)
  Thailand Winners (1996, 2000, 2002)
  Singapore Winners (1998, 2004, 2007)
  Indonesia Runners-up (2000, 2002, 2004)
  Malaysia Runners-up (1996)
  Myanmar Fourth-place (2004)
  Laos Group stage (1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2007, 2008)
  Philippines Group stage (1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2007)

Squads edit

Final tournament edit

Group stage edit

Key to colours in group tables
Top two placed teams advanced to the semi-finals

Group A edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
  Indonesia 3 3 0 0 13 2 +11 9
  Malaysia 3 1 1 1 6 6 0 4
  Thailand 3 0 2 1 3 4 −1 2
  Laos 3 0 1 2 3 13 −10 1
Thailand  2–2  Laos
Sarayuth   67', 90' Report Konekham   53'
Kanlaya   81'
Indonesia  5–1  Malaysia
Asraruddin   22' (o.g.)
Gonzáles   33'
Ridwan   52'
Arif   76'
Irfan   90+4'
Report Norshahrul   18'

Thailand  0–0  Malaysia
Report
Laos  0–6  Indonesia
Report Firman   26' (pen.), 51'
Ridwan   33'
Irfan   63'
Arif   77'
Okto   82'

Malaysia  5–1  Laos
Amri   4', 41'
Amirul   74'
Norshahrul   77'
Mahali   90+3'
Report Lamnao   8'
Indonesia  2–1  Thailand
Bambang   82' (pen.), 90+1' (pen.) Report Suree   69'
Attendance: 65,000
Referee: Ryuji Sato (Japan)

Group B edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
  Vietnam 3 2 0 1 8 3 +5 6
  Philippines 3 1 2 0 3 1 +2 5
  Singapore 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 4
  Myanmar 3 0 1 2 2 9 −7 1
Singapore  1–1  Philippines
Đurić   65' Report C. Greatwich   90+3'
Vietnam  7–1  Myanmar
Nguyễn Anh Đức   13', 56'
Nguyễn Minh Phương   30'
Lê Tấn Tài   51'
Nguyễn Trọng Hoàng   73', 83'
Nguyễn Vũ Phong   90+4'
Report Aung Kyaw Moe   16'

Singapore  2–1  Myanmar
Đurić   62'
Casmir   90+4'
Report Khin Maung Lwin   13'
Philippines  2–0  Vietnam
C. Greatwich   38'
P. Younghusband   79'
Report

Vietnam  1–0  Singapore
Nguyễn Vũ Phong   32' Report

Knockout stage edit

Semi-finals Final
          
A2   Malaysia 2 0 2
B1   Vietnam 0 0 0
A2   Malaysia 3 1 4
A1   Indonesia 0 2 2
B2   Philippines 0 0 0
A1   Indonesia 1 1 2

Semi-finals edit

First Leg
Malaysia  2–0  Vietnam
Safee   60', 79' Report
Philippines  0–1  Indonesia
Report Gonzáles   32'

Second Leg
Vietnam  0–0  Malaysia
Report

Malaysia won 2–0 on aggregate.

Indonesia  1–0  Philippines
Gonzáles   43' Report

Indonesia won 2–0 on aggregate.


The first leg of the semi-finals was supposed to be played in the Philippines. However, due to the unavailability of a stadium that passes AFF standards, both legs were hosted by Indonesia.[13]

Final edit

First Leg
Malaysia  3–0  Indonesia
Safee   61, 72'
Ashaari   68'
Report
Second Leg
Indonesia  2–1  Malaysia
Nasuha   72'
Ridwan   87'
Report Safee   54'

Malaysia won 4–2 on aggregate.

Awards edit

 2010 AFF Championship champion 
 
Malaysia

First title
Most Valuable Player Golden Boot Fair Play Award
  Firman Utina   Safee Sali   Philippines[14]

Goalscorers edit

5 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
Own goals

Team statistics edit

This table shows all team performance.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD
Final
1   Malaysia 7 3 2 2 12 8 +4
2   Indonesia 7 6 0 1 17 6 +11
Semi-finals
3   Vietnam 5 2 1 2 8 5 +3
4   Philippines 5 1 2 2 3 3 0
Eliminated in the group stage
5   Singapore 3 1 1 1 3 3 0
6   Thailand 3 0 2 1 3 4 −1
7   Myanmar 3 0 1 2 2 9 −7
8   Laos 3 0 1 2 3 13 −10

Media coverage edit

2010 AFF Championship Broadcasters in Southeast Asia
Country Network Station Television Station Radio Station
  Brunei Radio Televisyen Brunei RTB TV1 Radio Nasional Brunei
  Cambodia National Radio and Television of Cambodia National Television of Cambodia National Radio of Cambodia
  Indonesia Media Nusantara Citra RCTI Trijaya FM
  Laos Lao National Radio and Television Lao National Television Lao National Radio
  Malaysia RTM TV1 Hot FM
  Myanmar Myanmar Radio and Television Myanmar Television Myanmar Radio
  Philippines ABS-CBN Studio 23 DZSR Sports Radio 918
  Singapore Media Corporation of Singapore, SingTel MediaCorp TV Channel 5, mio TV 938LIVE
  Thailand Channel 7 (Thailand) CH7 NBT Network 1 Radio in Thailand
  East Timor Radio-Televisão Timor Leste Televisão Timor Leste Radio Timor Leste
  Vietnam Vietnam Television VTV2 Voice of Vietnam

Incidents edit

During the group match between Indonesia and Malaysia at the Gelora Bung Karno Stadium, some Indonesian fans are seen pointing green laser lights towards Malaysian goalkeeper Mohd Sharbinee when Indonesia scored their fifth goal as seen here. Other incidents also occurred soon after Malaysia's semi-final home leg against Vietnam, when Vietnamese goalkeeper Bùi Tấn Trường stated that he was targeted with green laser pointers from the Malaysian fans when he prepared for goal kicks and when saving the ball, which caused him to turn his head away.[15] During the final, Malaysia's fans again targeted the opposition players with green laser pointers. The first leg, also at the Bukit Jalil National Stadium, was stopped for eight minutes starting in the 53rd minute when the Indonesian players walked off in protest and complained to referee Masaaki Toma about the laser lights.[16][17] Malaysia scored their first goal right after play was resumed.[18] The return-leg final in Jakarta saw Indonesian fans also pointing green laser lights again towards Malaysian goalkeeper Khairul Fahmi Che Mat.[19][20][21][22]

References edit

  1. ^ "Suzuki renew its title sponsorship of AFF Cup". AseanFootball.org. 5 August 2010. Retrieved 7 August 2010.[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ "December 2010 event calendar". World Sports Group. Archived from the original on 18 July 2011. Retrieved 20 January 2010.
  3. ^ a b "Participating teams at 2010 AFF Suzuki Cup". Dang Cong San. Archived from the original on 17 September 2011. Retrieved 28 January 2010.
  4. ^ "Hard work pays off, says McMenemy". AFFSuzukiCup.com. 9 December 2010. Archived from the original on 11 December 2010. Retrieved 20 December 2010.
  5. ^ "Football: Malaysia edge Vietnam to enter AFF Cup final after 14 years". Bernama. 19 December 2010. Retrieved 19 December 2010.
  6. ^ "VFF asks to host AFF Suzuki Cup 2010". Vietnam Net. 17 February 2009. Archived from the original on 26 February 2009. Retrieved 17 February 2009.
  7. ^ "Vietnam co-hosts 2010 AFF Cup with Indonesia". Vietnam Net. 21 April 2009. Archived from the original on 25 April 2009. Retrieved 21 April 2009.
  8. ^ "Vietnam, Indonesia to co-host 2010 regional football cup". Sài Gòn Giải Phóng. 20 April 2009. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 20 April 2009.
  9. ^ "AFF Suzuki Cup 2010: SVĐ Thiên Trường được chọn là sân thi đấu thứ hai tại bảng B". VFF.org.vn (in Vietnamese). Vietnam Football Federation. 22 November 2010. Archived from the original on 24 November 2010. Retrieved 24 November 2010.
  10. ^ "Jakabaring as secondary venue in Indonesia". AseanFootball.org. ASEAN Football Federation. 24 November 2010. Retrieved 24 November 2010.[permanent dead link]
  11. ^ "Palembang Gelar Pertandingan AFF 2010 - Bola.net".
  12. ^ "Fifa suspend Brunei". The Straits Times. 30 September 2009. Archived from the original on 3 October 2009. Retrieved 28 January 2010.
  13. ^ "Press statement from AFF – Confirmed venues for knock-out stages". AFFSuzukiCup.com. 9 December 2010. Archived from the original on 10 December 2010.
  14. ^ Ramos, Josef (31 December 2010). "Filipino booters 'Azkals' win Fair Play Award in Suzuki Cup". Manila Times. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  15. ^ "Malaysian fans shone laser in Vietnam goalie's eyes". Tuoi Tre News. 17 December 2010. Archived from the original on 21 December 2010. Retrieved 28 December 2010.
  16. ^ "Fan laser beams mar Malaysia win over Indonesia". Jakarta Globe. 27 December 2010. Archived from the original on 12 January 2011. Retrieved 28 December 2010.
  17. ^ "Malaysia stride towards cup win". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 26 December 2010. Archived from the original on 29 December 2010. Retrieved 28 December 2010.
  18. ^ "Safee strikes twice as Malaysia take three-goal lead in first leg final". AseanFootball.org. ASEAN Football Federation. 27 December 2010. Retrieved 31 December 2010.
  19. ^ Triyadi, Bogi (29 December 2010). "Ada Laser di GBK" (in Indonesian). Liputan 6. Retrieved 20 January 2011.
  20. ^ "Laser pointers not a problem". NST.com. New Straits Times. 30 December 2010. Archived from the original on 5 February 2011. Retrieved 20 January 2011.
  21. ^ Purwadi, Didi (31 December 2010). "Che Mat Mengaku Tidak Terganggu Sinar Laser". Republika.co.id (in Indonesian). PT Republika Media Mandiri. Retrieved 20 January 2011.
  22. ^ Wiradinata, Avandi (31 December 2010). "Kiper Malaysia Sindir Markus Horison soal Laser" (in Indonesian). Bola Inilah. Retrieved 20 January 2011.

External links edit