AFF Championship

The ASEAN Football Federation Championship, less formally the AFF Championship or AFF Cup, is the primary association football tournament organized by the ASEAN Football Federation (AFF).

AFF Championship
AFF Championship symbol.png
Symbol used since the 2018 edition
Founded1996; 26 years ago (1996)
RegionAFF (Southeast Asia)
Number of teams10 (finals)
11 (eligible to enter qualification)
Current champions Thailand (6th title)
Most successful team(s)Thailand Thailand (6 titles)
WebsiteOfficial website
Stadion Pakansari AFF 2016 Final.jpg
AFF Suzuki Cup 2016 final match first leg between Indonesia and Thailand
Tournaments

A biennial international association football competition, it is contested by the men's national teams of the AFF, determining the sub-continental champion of Southeast Asia. The competition has been held every two years since 1996 scheduled to be in the even-numbered year, except for 2007, and 2020 (which was postponed to 2021 due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic).

Founded as the Tiger Cup after Singapore-based Asia Pacific Breweries, the makers of Tiger Beer, it sponsored the competition from its inauguration in 1996 until the 2004 edition. After Asia Pacific Breweries withdrew as title sponsors, the competition was known simply as the AFF Championship for the 2007 edition. In 2008, Japanese auto-company Suzuki bought the naming rights for the competition, and the competition had been named the AFF Suzuzi Cup until the 2020 edition.[1] On 23 May 2022, AFF announced a new deal with another Japanese company Mitsubishi Electric as the new title sponsor, therefore, the tournament has been named the AFF Mitsubishi Electric Cup since the 2022 edition.[2]

The AFF Championship title have been won by four national teams; Thailand have won six titles, Singapore has four titles, Vietnam has two titles and Malaysia with one title. To date, Thailand and Singapore are the only teams in history to have won consecutive titles; Thailand in 2000 and 2002 and also in 2014 and 2016, and Singapore in 2004 and 2007. It is one of the most watched football tournaments in the region.

Since 2018, the championship winners would compete in the following AFF–EAFF Champions Trophy, against the winner of the EAFF E-1 Football Championship, the champions of East Asia, to determine the champions of East and Southeast Asia.

Since joining the AFF in 2013, Australia has never competed in the AFF Championship.

HistoryEdit

The first ASEAN Championship took place in 1996 with the six founding members of ASEAN Federation competing with four nations being invited that came in that region. The final saw Thailand become the first champions of ASEAN as they defeated Malaysia 1–0 in Singapore.[3] The top four nations automatically qualified through to the finals in the following edition. This meant the other six nations had to compete in qualifying for the remaining four spots. Myanmar, Singapore, Laos and Philippines all made it through to the main tournament.

OrganisationEdit

Sports marketing, media and event management firm, Lagardère Sports has been involved in the tournament since the inaugural edition in 1996.

Between 1996 and 2006, Tiger Beer was the title sponsor. Suzuki has been title sponsor of the tournament since 2008.[4]

FormatEdit

From 2004, the knockout stage is played over two legs on a home-and-away format. Since the 2007 edition, there was no third place match; semi-finalists are listed in alphabetical order. The away goals rule has been applied for knockout stage since the 2010 edition.[a]

Starting with the 2018 edition, a new format was applied. The nine highest ranked teams would automatically qualify with the 10th and 11th ranked teams playing in a two-legged qualifier. The 10 teams were split in two groups of five and play a round robin system, with each team playing two home and two away fixtures. A draw was made to determine where the teams play while the format of the knockout round remained unchanged.[5]

ResultsEdit

Year Host Final Third place playoff Number of teams
Winners Score Runners-up Third place Score Fourth place
1996   Singapore  
Thailand
1–0  
Malaysia
 
Vietnam
3–2  
Indonesia
10
1998   Vietnam  
Singapore
1–0  
Vietnam
 
Indonesia
3–3 (a.e.t.)
(5–4 p)
 
Thailand
8
2000   Thailand  
Thailand
4–1  
Indonesia
 
Malaysia
3–0  
Vietnam
9
2002   Indonesia
  Singapore
 
Thailand
2–2 aet
(4–2) pen
 
Indonesia
 
Vietnam
2–1  
Malaysia
9
Year Group stage hosts Final Third place playoff or losing semi-finalists Number of teams
Winners Score Runners-up Third place Score Fourth place
2004   Malaysia
  Vietnam
 
Singapore
3–1
2–1
 
Indonesia
 
Malaysia
2–1  
Myanmar
10
won 5–2 on aggregate
2007   Singapore
  Thailand
 
Singapore
2–1
1–1
 
Thailand
  Malaysia and   Vietnam 8
won 3–2 on aggregate
2008   Indonesia
  Thailand
 
Vietnam
2–1
1–1
 
Thailand
  Indonesia and   Singapore 8
won 3–2 on aggregate
2010   Indonesia
  Vietnam
 
Malaysia
3–0
1–2
 
Indonesia
  Philippines and   Vietnam 8
won 4–2 on aggregate
2012   Malaysia
  Thailand
 
Singapore
3–1
0–1
 
Thailand
  Malaysia and   Philippines 8
won 3–2 on aggregate
2014   Singapore
  Vietnam
 
Thailand
2–0
2–3
 
Malaysia
  Philippines and   Vietnam 8
won 4–3 on aggregate
2016   Myanmar
  Philippines
 
Thailand
1–2
2–0
 
Indonesia
  Myanmar and   Vietnam 8
won 3–2 on aggregate
Year Final Losing semi-finalists Number of teams
Winner Score Runner-up
2018  
Vietnam
2–2
1–0
 
Malaysia
  Philippines and   Thailand 10
won 3–2 on aggregate
2020[b]   Singapore[c]  
Thailand[d]
4–0
2–2
 
Indonesia[d]
  Singapore and   Vietnam 10
won 6–2 on aggregate
2022 10

Performances by countryEdit

Team Champions Runners-up Third place / Semi-finalists Fourth place Total Top 4
  Thailand 6 (1996, 2000, 2002, 2014, 2016, 2020) 3 (2007, 2008, 2012) 1 (2018) 1 (1998) 11
  Singapore 4 (1998, 2004, 2007, 2012) 2 (2008, 2020) 6
  Vietnam 2 (2008, 2018) 1 (1998) 7 (1996, 2002, 2007, 2010, 2014, 2016, 2020) 1 (2000) 11
  Malaysia 1 (2010) 3 (1996, 2014, 2018) 4 (2000, 2004, 2007, 2012) 1 (2002) 9
  Indonesia 6 (2000, 2002, 2004, 2010, 2016, 2020) 2 (1998, 2008) 1 (1996) 9
  Philippines 4 (2010, 2012, 2014, 2018) 4
  Myanmar 1 (2016) 1 (2004) 2
Total 13 13 21 5 52

Participating nationsEdit

Team  
1996
(10)
 
1998
(8)
 
2000
(9)
 
 
2002
(9)
 
 
2004
(10)
 
 
2007
(8)
 
 
2008
(8)
 
 
2010
(8)
 
 
2012
(8)
 
 
2014
(8)
 
 
2016
(8)
 
2018
(10)
 
2020
(10)
 
2022
TBD
Total
  Australia[note 1] Not an AFF member × × × × 0
  Brunei GS × × × × × 1
  Cambodia GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS 8
  Indonesia 4th 3rd 2nd 2nd 2nd GS SF 2nd GS GS 2nd GS 2nd 13
  Laos GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS GS 12
  Malaysia 2nd GS 3rd 4th 3rd SF GS 1st SF 2nd GS 2nd GS 13
  Myanmar GS GS GS GS 4th GS GS GS GS GS SF GS GS 13
  Philippines GS GS GS GS GS GS SF SF SF GS SF GS 12
  Singapore GS 1st GS GS 1st 1st SF GS 1st GS GS GS SF 13
  Thailand 1st 4th 1st 1st GS 2nd 2nd GS 2nd 1st 1st SF 1st 13
  Timor-Leste Part of Indonesia × GS GS GS 3
  Vietnam 3rd 2nd 4th 3rd GS SF 1st SF GS SF SF 1st SF 13
Legend

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Since joining the AFF in 2013, Australia has never competed in the AFF Championship. Australia has, however, competed in the EAFF Championship in 2013.

AwardsEdit

Tournament Most Valuable Player Top goalscorer(s) Goals Young Player of the Tournament Fair play award
1996   Zainal Abidin Hassan   Natipong Sritong-In 7 N/A
(awarded in 2020)
  Brunei
1998   Nguyễn Hồng Sơn   Myo Hlaing Win 4 Not awarded
2000   Kiatisuk Senamuang   Gendut Doni Christiawan 5   Malaysia
  Worrawoot Srimaka
2002   Therdsak Chaiman   Bambang Pamungkas 8 Not awarded
2004   Lionel Lewis   Ilham Jaya Kesuma 7
2007   Noh Alam Shah   Noh Alam Shah 10
2008   Dương Hồng Sơn   Budi Sudarsono 4   Thailand
  Agu Casmir
  Teerasil Dangda
2010   Firman Utina   Safee Sali 5   Philippines
2012   Shahril Ishak   Teerasil Dangda 5   Malaysia
2014   Chanathip Songkrasin   Safiq Rahim 6   Vietnam
2016   Chanathip Songkrasin   Teerasil Dangda 6   Thailand
2018   Nguyễn Quang Hải   Adisak Kraisorn 8   Malaysia
2020   Chanathip Songkrasin[d]   Safawi Rasid 4   Pratama Arhan[d]   Indonesia[d]
  Bienvenido Marañón
  Chanathip Songkrasin[d]
  Teerasil Dangda[d]

Overall top goalscorersEdit

As of 2020 final
Rank Player Goals
1   Teerasil Dangda 19
2   Noh Alam Shah 17
3   Worrawoot Srimaka 15
  Lê Công Vinh
5   Lê Huỳnh Đức 14
6   Kurniawan Dwi Yulianto 13
7   Bambang Pamungkas 12
  Kiatisuk Senamuang
9   Agu Casmir 11
  Adisak Kraisorn
11   Khairul Amri 10
  • Bold denotes players still playing international football

Winning coachesEdit

Year Team Coach
1996   Thailand   Thawatchai Sartjakul
1998   Singapore   Barry Whitbread
2000   Thailand   Peter Withe
2002   Thailand   Peter Withe
2004   Singapore   Radojko Avramović
2007   Singapore   Radojko Avramović
2008   Vietnam   Henrique Calisto
2010   Malaysia   K. Rajagopal
2012   Singapore   Radojko Avramović
2014   Thailand   Kiatisuk Senamuang[1]
2016   Thailand   Kiatisuk Senamuang[1]
2018   Vietnam   Park Hang-seo
2020   Thailand[d]   Alexandré Pölking
  • ^[1] - being the only person to win the competition as a player (1996, 2000, 2002) then coach (2014, 2016).

All-time ranking tableEdit

As of the 2020 edition
Rank Team Part Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Best finish
1   Thailand 13 78 49 18 11 169 91 +78 165 Champions (1996, 2000, 2002, 2014, 2016, 2020)
2   Vietnam 13 71 37 19 15 145 74 +71 130 Champions (2008, 2018)
3   Indonesia 13 70 35 15 20 177 124 +53 120 Runners-up (2000, 2002, 2004, 2010, 2016, 2020)
4   Singapore 13 62 31 15 16 112 62 +50 108 Champions (1998, 2004, 2007, 2012)
5   Malaysia 13 69 30 15 24 120 81 +39 105 Champions (2010)
6   Myanmar 13 46 15 7 24 58 101 -43 52 Semi-finalists (2004, 2016)
7   Philippines 12 44 10 4 30 47 50 –3 34 Semi-finalists (2010, 2012, 2014, 2018)
8   Cambodia 8 30 4 0 26 29 102 –73 12 Group stage (8 times)
9   Laos 12 41 2 5 34 30 155 –125 11 Group stage (12 times)
10   Brunei 1 4 1 0 3 1 15 –14 3 Group stage (1996)
11   Timor-Leste 3 12 0 0 12 6 50 –44 0 Group stage (2004, 2018, 2020)

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Except the 2020 edition due to all matches were hosted in only venue.
  2. ^ Postponed to 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  3. ^ The 2020 AFF Championship was hosted in a centralized venue due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in Southeast Asia. On 28 September 2021, it was announced that Singapore would host the tournament.[6]
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Due to non-compliance with conditions set by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), Thailand and Indonesia were not allowed to be represented by their national flags.[7][8] The sanctions took effect in October 2021.[9] Thailand is represented by its national team logo while Indonesia is represented by its coat of arms.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ A look back at the history of the AFF Suzuki Cup and its past 12 editions
  2. ^ User, Super. "AFF Announces Mitsubishi Electric As The New Title Sponsor Of AFF Mitsubishi Electric Cup 2022". www.affmitsubishielectriccup.com. Retrieved 24 May 2022. {{cite web}}: |last= has generic name (help)
  3. ^ "About AFF". aseanfootball.org.
  4. ^ "Suzuki drives Asean Football Championship to new heights". Singapore: ASEAN Football Federation. 19 July 2016. Retrieved 25 July 2016.
  5. ^ "New format confirmed for AFF Suzuki Cup". Football Channel Asia. 14 March 2016. Archived from the original on 14 March 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2016.
  6. ^ Noronha, Anselm (28 September 2021). "Singapore to host AFF Suzuki Cup 2020: Teams, how to watch & more | Goal.com". Goal.com. Retrieved 29 September 2021.
  7. ^ "Thailand loses right to host tournaments". Bangkok Post. Bangkok Post Public Co. Ltd. Retrieved 25 November 2021. The country has also been denied the right to display its national flag at any such events (international football events).
  8. ^ "Chairman Of PSSI: Regarding The Flag At AFF 2020, We Will Follow Whatever The Decision Is". VOI – Waktunya Merevolusi Pemberitaan. 24 November 2021. Retrieved 25 November 2021.
  9. ^ "WADA confirms non-compliance of five Anti-Doping Organizations (7 October 2021)". World Anti-Doping Agency. 7 October 2021. Retrieved 4 December 2021.

External linksEdit