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Switzerland national football team

The Switzerland national football team is the national football team of Switzerland. The team is controlled by the Swiss Football Association.

Switzerland
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) A-Team
Nati (National Team)
Rossocrociati (Red Crosses)
Association Swiss Football Association
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Vladimir Petković
Captain Stephan Lichtsteiner
Most caps Heinz Hermann (118)[1]
Top scorer Alexander Frei (42)
FIFA code SUI
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 6 Steady (7 June 2018)
Highest 3 (August 1993)
Lowest 83 (December 1998)
Elo ranking
Current 14 (12 June 2018)
Highest 9 (5 June 1924)
Lowest 62 (October 1979)
First international
 France 1–0 Switzerland  
(Paris, France; 12 February 1905)
Biggest win
  Switzerland 9–0 Lithuania 
(Paris, France; 25 May 1924)
Biggest defeat
  Switzerland 0–9 England 
(Basel, Switzerland; 20 May 1909)
 Hungary 9–0 Switzerland  
(Budapest, Hungary; 29 October 1911)
World Cup
Appearances 11 (first in 1934)
Best result Quarter-finals: 1934, 1938 and 1954
European Championship
Appearances 4 (first in 1996)
Best result Round of 16, 2016
Olympic medal record
Men’s Football
Silver medal – second place 1924 Paris Team

Its best performances in the World Cup have been reaching the quarter-finals three times, in 1934, 1938 and when the country hosted the event in 1954. Switzerland also won silver at the 1924 Olympics.

In 2006, Switzerland set a FIFA World Cup record by being eliminated from the competition despite not conceding a goal, losing to Ukraine in a penalty shootout in the round of 16, by failing to score a single penalty – becoming the first national team in Cup history to do this.[2] They would not concede a goal until their second group stage match in the 2010 World Cup, conceding a goal in the 74th minute to Chile, setting a World Cup finals record for consecutive minutes without conceding a goal.

Switzerland co-hosted Euro 2008 with Austria, making their third appearance in the competition. As with the two previous appearances, they did not progress past the group stage.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Switzerland earned the silver medal at the 1924 Olympic Games in Paris, after losing 3–0 to Uruguay in the final. The team participated in its first FIFA World Cup in 1934, where it reached the quarter-final before losing to Czechoslovakia. Switzerland again reached the quarter-final stage in 1938, losing to Hungary. Switzerland hosted the tournament in 1954 and reached the quarter-final for a third time, where the team was beaten 7–5 by neighbouring Austria. The Swiss also qualified for the World Cup in 1950, 1962 and 1966, losing in the first round on each occasion.

After the appointment of English manager Roy Hodgson in 1992, Switzerland rose to its highest ever position in the FIFA World Rankings and qualified for the World Cup for the first time in 28 years. At the tournament finals, the team qualified for the second round before losing 3–0 to Spain. The team then qualified for its first ever UEFA European Championship. For the finals of UEFA Euro 1996, Hodgson was replaced by the Portuguese Artur Jorge, and the side finished bottom of its group.

 
The Swiss line-up against China, just before World Cup 2006

Switzerland qualified for Euro 2004 in Portugal, where they came last in Group B. Johann Vonlanthen became the youngest scorer ever in the Euro championships when he equalised against France, breaking the record (set only four days earlier by Wayne Rooney) by three months.[3] The 2006 World Cup in Germany was the first World Cup for Switzerland since 1994. After finishing second behind France in qualifying Group 4, they defeated Turkey on the away goals rule in the play-off round 2–0 and 2–4 (4–4 aggregate) to qualify for the main tournament. They topped Group G and lost on penalties to Ukraine in the last 16, therefore becoming the first team to be eliminated from the World Cup without conceding a goal. Switzerland co-hosted Euro 2008 with Austria , but were eliminated in the group stage.

In their first match at the 2010 FIFA World Cup, the team defeated eventual champions Spain 1–0 with a goal by Gelson Fernandes, but were still eliminated at the group stage. The goal by Mark González in the 75th minute of the game against Chile ended a 559-minute streak without conceding a goal in World Cup matches, beating the record previously held by Italy by nine minutes.[4] Switzerland did not qualify for UEFA Euro 2012, therefore missing a tournament for the first time in a decade. At the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil, Switzerland qualified for the last 16 with a win over Honduras including a hat-trick from Xherdan Shaqiri. In the next match against eventual finalists Argentina, a goal from Ángel Di María with two minutes of extra time eliminated the Swiss, and manager Ottmar Hitzfeld retired afterwards.

Switzerland again reached the last 16 at UEFA Euro 2016 in France, where they were eliminated on penalties by Poland in Saint-Étienne. To qualify for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, they won 1–0 against Northern Ireland in the play-offs, via a controversial penalty from full-back Ricardo Rodríguez.

Competitive recordEdit

Switzerland is yet to earn a major trophy. The closest they have come was the quarter-finals of the World Cup on three occasions (1934, 1938 and 1954) and they won a silver medal in the 1924 Olympic games in Paris. The youth teams have been more successful, as the under-17 squad became European champions in 2002 and World champions in 2009, while the under-21 squad qualified for the semi-finals of the 2002 UEFA European Under-21 Championship.

World Cup recordEdit

Switzerland's record at FIFA World Cups.[5]

Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
  1930 Did Not Enter
  1934 Quarter-Finals 7th 2 1 0 1 5 5
  1938 7th 3 1 1 1 5 5
  1950 Group Stage 6th 3 1 1 1 4 6
  1954 Quarter-Finals 8th 4 2 0 2 11 11
  1958 Did Not Qualify
  1962 Group Stage 16th 3 0 0 3 2 8
  1966 16th 3 0 0 3 1 9
  1970 Did Not Qualify
  1974
  1978
  1982
  1986
  1990
  1994 Round of 16 16th 4 1 1 2 5 7
  1998 Did Not Qualify
   2002
  2006 Round of 16 10th 4 2 2 0 4 0
  2010 Group Stage 19th 3 1 1 1 1 1
  2014 Round of 16 11th 4 2 0 2 7 7
  2018 Qualified
  2022 To be determined
Total Quarter-Finals 11/22 33 11 6 16 45 59

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European Championship recordEdit

Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
  1960 Did Not Enter
  1964 Did Not Qualify
  1968
  1972
  1976
  1980
  1984
  1988
  1992
  1996 Group Stage 13th 3 0 1 2 1 4
   2000 Did Not Qualify
  2004 Group Stage 15th 3 0 1 2 1 6
   2008 11th 3 1 0 2 3 3
   2012 Did Not Qualify
  2016 Round of 16 11th 4 1 3 0 3 2
  2020 To be determined
Total Group Stage 4/16 13 2 5 6 8 15
*Denotes draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.

UEFA Nations League recordEdit

UEFA Championship record
Year Division Group Round Pos Pld W D L GF GA
2018–19 A 2 To be determined
Total 0/1 0 0 0 0 0 0

FIFA Confederations Cup recordEdit

Year Round Position GP W D L GS GA
  1992 Did Not Enter
  1995 Did Not Qualify
  1997
  1999
    2001
  2003
  2005
  2009
  2013
  2017
2021 To Be Determined
Total 0/11 0 0 0 0 0 0

Previous squadsEdit

Kits and crestEdit

The Switzerland home kit is red shirts, white shorts, and red socks and the away is the reversed of the kits is white shirts, red shorts, and white socks, although the shorts and socks of each kit are interchangeable if there is a minor clash. Ever since the team was established in 1895, they have always had the same colour code for both Home and Away kits, keeping it as tradition and homage to the national colours derived from the flag. The uniform is manufactured by Puma until the end of 2017–18 season.

Kit sponsorshipEdit

Kit supplier Duration
  Adidas 1976–1989
  Blacky 1990–1992
  Lotto 1992–1998
  Puma 1998–Present

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following players have been called up for the 2018 FIFA World Cup final squad.[6][7]
Caps and goals updated on 17 June 2018 after the match against   Brazil.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Yann Sommer (1988-12-17) 17 December 1988 (age 29) 36 0   Borussia Mönchengladbach
12 1GK Yvon Mvogo (1994-06-06) 6 June 1994 (age 24) 0 0   RB Leipzig
21 1GK Roman Bürki (1990-11-14) 14 November 1990 (age 27) 9 0   Borussia Dortmund

2 2DF Stephan Lichtsteiner (Captain) (1984-01-16) 16 January 1984 (age 34) 101 8   Arsenal
3 2DF François Moubandje (1990-06-21) 21 June 1990 (age 28) 18 0   Toulouse
4 2DF Nico Elvedi (1996-09-30) 30 September 1996 (age 21) 6 0   Borussia Mönchengladbach
5 2DF Manuel Akanji (1995-07-19) 19 July 1995 (age 22) 8 0   Borussia Dortmund
6 2DF Michael Lang (1991-02-08) 8 February 1991 (age 27) 25 2   Basel
13 2DF Ricardo Rodríguez (1992-08-25) 25 August 1992 (age 25) 54 5   Milan
20 2DF Johan Djourou (1987-01-18) 18 January 1987 (age 31) 74 2   Antalyaspor
22 2DF Fabian Schär (1991-12-20) 20 December 1991 (age 26) 40 7   Deportivo La Coruña

8 3MF Remo Freuler (1992-04-15) 15 April 1992 (age 26) 10 0   Atalanta
10 3MF Granit Xhaka (Vice-captain) (1992-09-27) 27 September 1992 (age 25) 63 9   Arsenal
11 3MF Valon Behrami (3rd captain) (1985-04-19) 19 April 1985 (age 33) 80 2   Udinese
14 3MF Steven Zuber (1991-08-17) 17 August 1991 (age 26) 13 4   1899 Hoffenheim
15 3MF Blerim Džemaili (1986-04-12) 12 April 1986 (age 32) 66 9   Bologna
16 3MF Gelson Fernandes (1986-09-02) 2 September 1986 (age 31) 67 2   Eintracht Frankfurt
17 3MF Denis Zakaria (1996-11-20) 20 November 1996 (age 21) 11 0   Borussia Mönchengladbach
23 3MF Xherdan Shaqiri (1991-10-10) 10 October 1991 (age 26) 71 20   Stoke City

7 4FW Breel Embolo (1997-02-14) 14 February 1997 (age 21) 26 3   Schalke 04
9 4FW Haris Seferović (1992-02-22) 22 February 1992 (age 26) 52 12   Benfica
18 4FW Mario Gavranović (1989-11-24) 24 November 1989 (age 28) 14 5   Dinamo Zagreb
19 4FW Josip Drmić (1992-08-08) 8 August 1992 (age 25) 29 9   Borussia Mönchengladbach

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have been called up for the team in the last 12 months and are still available for a call up.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Gregor Kobel (1997-12-06) 6 December 1997 (age 20) 0 0   1899 Hoffenheim 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE
GK Marwin Hitz (1987-09-18) 18 September 1987 (age 30) 2 0   Borussia Dortmund v.   Panama, 27 March 2018

DF Timm Klose (1988-05-09) 9 May 1988 (age 30) 16 0   Norwich City 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE
DF Silvan Widmer (1993-03-05) 5 March 1993 (age 25) 9 0   Udinese 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE
DF Kevin Mbabu (1995-04-19) 19 April 1995 (age 23) 0 0   Young Boys 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE
DF Léo Lacroix (1992-02-27) 27 February 1992 (age 26) 0 0   Basel v.   Northern Ireland, 12 November 2017

MF Fabian Frei (1989-01-08) 8 January 1989 (age 29) 14 3   Basel 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE
MF Luca Zuffi (1990-03-27) 27 March 1990 (age 28) 4 0   Basel 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE
MF Edimilson Fernandes (1996-04-15) 15 April 1996 (age 22) 3 0   West Ham United 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE
MF Djibril Sow (1997-02-06) 6 February 1997 (age 21) 0 0   Young Boys 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE

FW Eren Derdiyok (1988-06-12) 12 June 1988 (age 30) 60 11   Galatasaray 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE
FW Admir Mehmedi (1991-03-16) 16 March 1991 (age 27) 58 7   VfL Wolfsburg 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE / INJ
FW Dimitri Oberlin (1997-09-27) 27 September 1997 (age 20) 1 0   Basel 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE
FW Albian Ajeti (1997-02-26) 26 February 1997 (age 21) 0 0   Basel 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE

INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
RET Retired from international football.
PRE Preliminary squad.

Most appearances and goalsEdit

Most number of appearances and goals for the Swiss national team. Players in bold are still playing for the national team. Last updated after the match against Brazil, 17 June 2018.[8]

CoachesEdit

 
Vladimir Petković is the current manager
Nationality Name Term
  Karl Rappan 1960 – 11 November 1963
  Alfredo Foni 1 July 1964 – 3 May 1967
  Erwin Ballabio 24 May 1967 – 2 November 1969
  Louis Maurer 17 October 1970 – 10 October 1971
  René Hüssy 22 June 1973 – 8 September 1976
  Miroslav Blažević 8 September 1976 – 30 March 1977
  Roger Vonlanthen 30 March 1977 – 28 March 1979
  Leo Walker 5 May 1979 – 21 December 1980
  Paul Wolfisberg 24 March 1981 – 10 November 1985
  Daniel Jeandupeux 12 March 1986 – 26 April 1989
  Uli Stielike 21 June 1989 – 13 November 1991
  Roy Hodgson 26 January 1992 – 15 November 1995
  Artur Jorge 13 March 1996 – 18 June 1996
  Rolf Fringer 1 August 1996 – 11 October 1997
  Gilbert Gress 25 March 1998 – 9 October 1999
  Enzo Trossero 16 August 2000 – 6 June 2001
  Jakob "Köbi" Kuhn 15 August 2001 – 30 June 2008
  Ottmar Hitzfeld 1 July 2008 – July 2014
  Vladimir Petković 1 July 2014 – present

All-time head-to-head recordEdit

As of 17 June 2018.

  Positive Record   Neutral Record   Negative Record

  1. ^ Includes matches against   Czechoslovakia.
  2. ^ Includes matches against   West Germany.
  3. ^ Includes matches against   Soviet Union.
  4. ^ Includes matches against   Yugoslavia.

National team resultsEdit

Recent results and future matches.[9] Blue background colour indicates competitive matches.

Date Competition Opponent Venue Score Swiss scorers (International goal) Referee
25 March 2017 WC2018-Q   Latvia   Stade de Genève, Geneva 1–0 Drmic (9th)
1 June 2017 Friendly   Belarus   Stade de la Maladière, Neuchâtel 1–0 Shaqiri (19th)
9 June 2017 WC2018-Q   Faroe Islands   Tórsvøllur, Tórshavn 2–0 Xhaka (7th), Shaqiri (20th)
31 August 2017 WC2018-Q   Andorra   Kybunpark, St. Gallen 3–0 Seferović (9th), Seferović (10th), Lichtsteiner (7th)
3 September 2017 WC2018-Q   Latvia   Skonto Stadium, Riga 3–0 Seferović (11th), Džemaili (7th), Rodríguez (2nd),
7 October 2017 WC2018-Q   Hungary   St. Jakob-Park, Basel 5–2 Xhaka (8th), Frei (2nd), Zuber (1st), Zuber (2nd), Lichtsteiner (8th)
10 October 2017 WC2018-Q   Portugal   Estádio da Luz, Lisbon 0–2
9 November 2017 WC2018-Q   Northern Ireland   Windsor Park, Belfast 1–0 Rodríguez (3rd)
12 November 2017 WC2018-Q   Northern Ireland   St. Jakob-Park, Basel 0–0
23 March 2018 Friendly   Greece   Olympic Stadium, Athens 1–0 Džemaili (8th)
27 March 2018 Friendly   Panama   Swissporarena, Lucerne 6–0 Džemaili (9th), Xhaka (9th), Embolo (3rd), Zuber (3rd), Gavranović (5th), Frei (3rd)
3 June 2018 Friendly   Spain   Estadio de la Cerámica, Villarreal 1–1 Rodríguez (4th)
8 June 2018 Friendly   Japan   Cornaredo Stadium, Lugano 2–0 Rodríguez (5th), Seferović (12th)
17 June 2018 WC2018   Brazil   Rostov Arena, Rostov-on-Don 1–1 Zuber (4th)
22 June 2018 WC2018   Serbia   Kaliningrad Stadium, Kaliningrad
27 June 2018 WC2018   Costa Rica   Nizhny Novgorod Stadium, Nizhny Novgorod
8 September 2018 NL2018–19   Iceland   Kybunpark, St. Gallen
11 September 2018 Friendly   England   King Power Stadium, Leicester
12 October 2018 NL2018–19   Belgium   King Baudouin Stadium, Brussels
15 October 2018 NL2018–19   Iceland   Laugardalsvöllur, Reykjavík
14 November 2018 Friendly   Qatar  
18 November 2018 NL2018–19   Belgium  
2020 Friendly   Germany  

Swiss youth teamsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit