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2018 FIFA World Cup knockout stage

The knockout stage of the 2018 FIFA World Cup was the second and final stage of the competition, following the group stage. It began on 30 June with the round of 16 and ended on 15 July with the final match, held at the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow.[1] The top two teams from each group (16 in total) advanced to the knockout stage to compete in a single-elimination style tournament. A third place play-off was also played between the two losing teams of the semi-finals.[2]

France won the final 4–2 against Croatia for their second title.[3]

All times listed are local time.[1]

Contents

FormatEdit

In the knockout stage, if a match was level at the end of 90 minutes of normal playing time, extra time was played (two periods of 15 minutes each), where each team was allowed to make a fourth substitution.[4] If still tied after extra time, the match was decided by a penalty shoot-out to determine the winners.[2]

Qualified teamsEdit

The top two placed teams from each of the eight groups qualified for the knockout stage.[2]

Group Winners Runners-up
A   Uruguay   Russia
B   Spain   Portugal
C   France   Denmark
D   Croatia   Argentina
E   Brazil    Switzerland
F   Sweden   Mexico
G   Belgium   England
H   Colombia   Japan

BracketEdit

 
Round of 16Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
              
 
30 June – Sochi
 
 
  Uruguay2
 
6 July – Nizhny Novgorod
 
  Portugal1
 
  Uruguay0
 
30 June – Kazan
 
  France2
 
  France4
 
10 July – Saint Petersburg
 
  Argentina3
 
  France1
 
2 July – Samara
 
  Belgium0
 
  Brazil2
 
6 July – Kazan
 
  Mexico0
 
  Brazil1
 
2 July – Rostov-on-Don
 
  Belgium2
 
  Belgium3
 
15 July – Moscow (Luzhniki)
 
  Japan2
 
  France4
 
1 July – Moscow (Luzhniki)
 
  Croatia2
 
  Spain1 (3)
 
7 July – Sochi
 
  Russia (p)1 (4)
 
  Russia2 (3)
 
1 July – Nizhny Novgorod
 
  Croatia (p)2 (4)
 
  Croatia (p)1 (3)
 
11 July – Moscow (Luzhniki)
 
  Denmark1 (2)
 
  Croatia (a.e.t.)2
 
3 July – Saint Petersburg
 
  England1 Third place play-off
 
  Sweden1
 
7 July – Samara14 July – Saint Petersburg
 
   Switzerland0
 
  Sweden0  Belgium2
 
3 July – Moscow (Otkritie)
 
  England2   England0
 
  Colombia1 (3)
 
 
  England (p)1 (4)
 

Round of 16Edit

France vs ArgentinaEdit

 
Match referee Alireza Faghani presents one of eight yellow cards during the match.

The teams had faced each other in 11 previous matches, including two World Cup group stage matches, both won by Argentina (1–0 in 1930, and 2–1 in 1978).[5]

After nine minutes, Antoine Griezmann's 25-yard free-kick crashed back off Franco Armani's crossbar. After picking the ball up deep inside his own half, Kylian Mbappé set off on a run that was halted when Marcos Rojo hauled him down just inside the area. Griezmann stepped up and converted from the spot, sending the ball low to Armani's right. Four minutes before the interval, Ángel Di María shot from distance with his left foot to beat Hugo Lloris into the top right corner of the net. Three minutes after the restart, Éver Banega's free-kick was headed out towards Lionel Messi whose effort towards goal from the right was diverted past Lloris by Gabriel Mercado with his left leg. Nine minutes later, Lucas Hernández's cross from the left found Benjamin Pavard, who shot a half-volley from outside the area, sending it into Armani's top-right corner. Mbappé put France ahead again in the 64th minute when he picked up a loose ball in the left of the area, found a yard of space and fired in low with his left foot under Armani. His second – a first-time low finish from the right of the penalty area with his right foot – followed just four minutes later.[6] Sergio Agüero nodded home in the third minute of stoppage time from a Messi cross from the right.[7] Argentina had a final chance to score, but the ball was deflected, dumping them out of the World Cup.[8] This game was hailed as "one of the greatest World Cup games of all time" by The Independent.[9]

Didier Deschamps is now the longest-serving coach in the history of the French national team, with his 80th game in charge of France, moving ahead of his predecessor Raymond Domenech.[10] Mbappé became the first teenager to score at least twice in a World Cup tournament since Michael Owen in 1998, and the first teenager to score at least twice in a single World Cup match since Pelé netted twice for Brazil against Sweden in the 1958 final. Argentina are the first team to score at least three goals but still lose a World Cup match since the Soviet Union vs Belgium in 1986.[6] Pavard's strike was later voted as goal of the tournament.[11]

France  4–3  Argentina
Report
Attendance: 42,873[12]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
France[13]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Argentina[13]
GK 1 Hugo Lloris (c)
RB 2 Benjamin Pavard   73'
CB 4 Raphaël Varane
CB 5 Samuel Umtiti
LB 21 Lucas Hernández
CM 13 N'Golo Kanté
CM 6 Paul Pogba
RW 10 Kylian Mbappé   89'
AM 7 Antoine Griezmann   83'
LW 14 Blaise Matuidi   72'   75'
CF 9 Olivier Giroud   90+3'
Substitutions:
MF 12 Corentin Tolisso   75'
FW 18 Nabil Fekir   83'
FW 20 Florian Thauvin   89'
Manager:
Didier Deschamps
 
GK 12 Franco Armani
RB 2 Gabriel Mercado
CB 17 Nicolás Otamendi   90+3'
CB 16 Marcos Rojo   11'   46'
LB 3 Nicolás Tagliafico   19'
CM 15 Enzo Pérez   66'
CM 14 Javier Mascherano   43'
CM 7 Éver Banega   50'
RF 22 Cristian Pavón   75'
CF 10 Lionel Messi (c)
LF 11 Ángel Di María
Substitutions:
DF 6 Federico Fazio   46'
FW 19 Sergio Agüero   66'
MF 13 Maximiliano Meza   75'
Manager:
Jorge Sampaoli

Man of the Match:
Kylian Mbappé (France)[14]

Assistant referees:[13]
Reza Sokhandan (Iran)
Mohammadreza Mansouri (Iran)
Fourth official:
Julio Bascuñán (Chile)
Reserve assistant referee:
Christian Schiemann (Chile)
Video assistant referee:
Massimiliano Irrati (Italy)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Paweł Gil (Poland)
Carlos Astroza (Chile)
Paolo Valeri (Italy)

Uruguay vs PortugalEdit

 
The Uruguayan team celebrates after Edinson Cavani scores his team's second goal in the 62nd minute.

The teams had met in two previous matches, most recently in Brazil Independence Cup in 1972, the match ending in a 1–1 draw.[5]

In the seventh minute, Edinson Cavani switched play from right to left with a sweeping pass out to Luis Suárez, who delivered a cross which the former crashed home at the back post from six yards out. In the 55th minute, Raphaël Guerreiro delivered a cross from a short corner on the left, which Pepe finished with a downward header. Just seven minutes later, Rodrigo Bentancur collected the ball around 30 yards out and slipped a pass out to Cavani on the left side of the penalty area, Cavani then shot a curling right-foot strike into the right corner of the net to reclaim the lead for Uruguay. Bernardo Silva shot off-target with the goal gaping after Fernando Muslera's mistake, with Cavani seeming to pick up an injury in the scramble.[15]

Pepe, aged 35 years and 124 days, became Portugal's oldest goal-scorer at a FIFA World Cup.[16] This is the first time Uruguay have won their opening four games at a World Cup tournament since 1930, with the fourth game in that run being their 4–2 victory over Argentina in the final.[17]

Uruguay  2–1  Portugal
Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Uruguay[19]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Portugal[19]
GK 1 Fernando Muslera
RB 22 Martín Cáceres
CB 2 José Giménez
CB 3 Diego Godín (c)
LB 17 Diego Laxalt
RM 8 Nahitan Nández   81'
CM 14 Lucas Torreira
CM 15 Matías Vecino
LM 6 Rodrigo Bentancur   63'
CF 9 Luis Suárez
CF 21 Edinson Cavani   74'
Substitutions:
MF 7 Cristian Rodríguez   63'
FW 11 Cristhian Stuani   74'
MF 5 Carlos Sánchez   81'
Manager:
Óscar Tabárez
 
GK 1 Rui Patrício
RB 15 Ricardo Pereira
CB 3 Pepe
CB 6 José Fonte
LB 5 Raphaël Guerreiro
RM 11 Bernardo Silva
CM 14 William Carvalho
CM 23 Adrien Silva   65'
LM 10 João Mário   84'
CF 17 Gonçalo Guedes   74'
CF 7 Cristiano Ronaldo (c)   90+3'
Substitutions:
FW 20 Ricardo Quaresma   65'
FW 9 André Silva   74'
MF 4 Manuel Fernandes   84'
Manager:
Fernando Santos

Man of the Match:
Edinson Cavani (Uruguay)[20]

Assistant referees:[19]
Marvin Torrentera (Mexico)
Miguel Hernández (Mexico)
Fourth official:
Jair Marrufo (United States)
Reserve assistant referee:
Corey Rockwell (United States)
Video assistant referee:
Mark Geiger (United States)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Bastian Dankert (Germany)
Joe Fletcher (Canada)
Danny Makkelie (Netherlands)

Spain vs RussiaEdit

 
Marco Asensio (left) and Roman Zobnin (right) challenge for possession of the ball.

The teams had met in six previous games, most recently in a friendly in 2017, which ended in a 3–3 draw. Playing as the Soviet Union, the teams had faced each other five times.[5] Russia has only had one victory over Spain.

In the 12th minute, Isco's free-kick from deep on the right saw Sergei Ignashevich grappling with Sergio Ramos at the back post, the ball bouncing past Igor Akinfeev off the defender's heel. Russia were then awarded a penalty when Gerard Piqué handled in the box after a corner from the right. Artem Dzyuba shot home to the right of the net from 12 yards to send the sides into half-time level. In the 85th minute, Akinfeev got down low to his right to save a shot from Andrés Iniesta, the goalkeeper then denied Iago Aspas on the rebound. Piqué and Ramos both appeared to be held from a set-piece but, after a VAR check, the referee waved away Spain's appeals. In the penalties, Akinfeev kept out a Koke effort and saw Aspas' effort diverted away by his leg to give Russia the win; as all Russia's penalty kicks ended up successful.[21]

Spain have now lost three of their four World Cup penalty shootouts (after losing to Belgium in 1986, beating the Republic of Ireland in 2002 and losing to South Korea in 2002), and still have never defeated a host nation at FIFA World Cup, after losing to Italy 0–1 in 1934, Brazil 1–6 in 1950, and South Korea after penalties in 2002.[22] Russia have reached the quarter-final of the World Cup for the first time since the break-up of the Soviet Union. Ignashevich became the oldest player to score an own goal at the World Cup, aged 38 years and 352 days.[23] The match marked the first time in the history of the FIFA World Cup in which a fourth substitution was made during extra time, after Aleksandr Yerokhin of Russia entered the pitch in the 97th minute.[24]

Spain  1–1 (a.e.t.)  Russia
Report
Penalties
3–4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Spain[26]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Russia[26]
GK 1 David de Gea
RB 4 Nacho   70'
CB 3 Gerard Piqué   40'
CB 15 Sergio Ramos (c)
LB 18 Jordi Alba
CM 8 Koke
CM 5 Sergio Busquets
RW 21 David Silva   67'
AM 22 Isco
LW 20 Marco Asensio   104'
CF 19 Diego Costa   80'
Substitutions:
MF 6 Andrés Iniesta   67'
DF 2 Dani Carvajal   70'
FW 17 Iago Aspas   80'
FW 9 Rodrigo   104'
Manager:
Fernando Hierro
 
GK 1 Igor Akinfeev (c)
SW 4 Sergei Ignashevich
CB 3 Ilya Kutepov   54'
CB 13 Fyodor Kudryashov
RWB 2 Mário Fernandes
LWB 18 Yuri Zhirkov   46'
CM 19 Aleksandr Samedov   61'
CM 11 Roman Zobnin   71'
CM 7 Daler Kuzyayev   97'
CF 22 Artem Dzyuba   65'
CF 17 Aleksandr Golovin
Substitutions:
DF 14 Vladimir Granat   46'
MF 6 Denis Cheryshev   61'
FW 10 Fyodor Smolov   65'
MF 21 Aleksandr Yerokhin   97'
Manager:
Stanislav Cherchesov

Man of the Match:
Igor Akinfeev (Russia)[27]

Assistant referees:[26]
Sander van Roekel (Netherlands)
Erwin Zeinstra (Netherlands)
Fourth official:
Clément Turpin (France)
Reserve assistant referee:
Nicolas Danos (France)
Video assistant referee:
Danny Makkelie (Netherlands)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Paweł Gil (Poland)
Mark Borsch (Germany)
Felix Zwayer (Germany)

Croatia vs DenmarkEdit

The teams had met in five matches, which includes two matches played in 1998 FIFA World Cup qualification, the first fixture ending in a 1–1 draw and the reverse fixture a 3–1 Denmark win.[5]

In the first minute, a long throw into the Croatia penalty area by Jonas Knudsen, allowed a run to Thomas Delaney who touched the ball on to Mathias Jørgensen, who side-footed it into the net via deflections off goalkeeper Danijel Subašić and the post. After three minutes, Šime Vrsaljko's ball into the box reached Henrik Dalsgaard, whose clearance hit Andreas Christensen in the face and saw Mario Mandžukić tucking the ball between Kasper Schmeichel and the left post with a shot on the turn from six yards. During extra time, Ante Rebić burst clear of the Denmark defence and was felled by Mathias Jørgensen when he was clean through on goal, only for Schmeichel to save Luka Modrić's spot-kick by diving down to his left and clutching the ball to his chest. In the shoot-out, Subašić tipped off Christian Eriksen's penalty onto the post but Schmeichel saved from Milan Badelj to bring the sides level. Lasse Schöne's shot was saved by Subašić and Josip Pivarić was denied by an acrobatic Schmeichel stop. On the final spot kicks for both the teams, Nicolai Jørgensen took a shot from a staggered run-up which Subašić saved with his feet, before Ivan Rakitić slotted the ball into the bottom left corner of the net.[28][29]

Croatia have qualified for their first World Cup quarter-final since 1998.[30]

Croatia  1–1 (a.e.t.)  Denmark
Report
Penalties
3–2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Croatia[32]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Denmark[32]
GK 23 Danijel Subašić
RB 2 Šime Vrsaljko
CB 6 Dejan Lovren
CB 21 Domagoj Vida
LB 3 Ivan Strinić   81'
CM 7 Ivan Rakitić
CM 11 Marcelo Brozović   71'
RW 18 Ante Rebić
AM 10 Luka Modrić (c)
LW 4 Ivan Perišić   97'
CF 17 Mario Mandžukić   108'
Substitutions:
MF 8 Mateo Kovačić   71'
DF 22 Josip Pivarić   81'
FW 9 Andrej Kramarić   97'
MF 19 Milan Badelj   108'
Manager:
Zlatko Dalić
 
GK 1 Kasper Schmeichel
RB 5 Jonas Knudsen
CB 4 Simon Kjær (c)
CB 13 Mathias Jørgensen   115'
LB 14 Henrik Dalsgaard
CM 6 Andreas Christensen   46'
CM 8 Thomas Delaney   98'
CM 10 Christian Eriksen
RF 20 Yussuf Poulsen
CF 21 Andreas Cornelius   66'
LF 11 Martin Braithwaite   106'
Substitutions:
MF 19 Lasse Schöne   46'
FW 9 Nicolai Jørgensen   66'
MF 2 Michael Krohn-Dehli   98'
FW 23 Pione Sisto   106'
Manager:
  Åge Hareide

Man of the Match:
Kasper Schmeichel (Denmark)[33]

Assistant referees:[32]
Hernán Maidana (Argentina)
Juan Pablo Belatti (Argentina)
Fourth official:
Enrique Cáceres (Paraguay)
Reserve assistant referee:
Eduardo Cardozo (Paraguay)
Video assistant referee:
Mauro Vigliano (Argentina)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Gery Vargas (Bolivia)
Roberto Díaz Pérez (Spain)
Daniele Orsato (Italy)

Brazil vs MexicoEdit

The teams had met in 40 previous matches including two games at CONCACAF Gold Cup finals (1996 and 2003, both won by Mexico), the 1999 FIFA Confederations Cup Final (won 4–3 by Mexico), and four times in the FIFA World Cup group stage, three won by Brazil and one ending in a draw (4–0 in 1950, 5–0 in 1954, 2–0 in 1962 and 0–0 in 2014).[5]

Hirving Lozano's half-volley was well blocked by Miranda, while at the other end, Guillermo Ochoa saved Neymar's drive from just outside the penalty area. After 25 minutes, Neymar raced past Edson Álvarez in the area and forced Ochoa into a save with his left hand. Gabriel Jesus went close in the 33rd minute, finding space in a crowded area and drilling in a left-footed strike that Ochoa palmed away. In the 51st minute, Neymar's back-heel on the edge of the area teed up Willian for a burst into the box and his scuffed cross from the left was slid into an empty net by Neymar from close range. With two minutes remaining, Neymar powered through on the left and his low effort was diverted by Ochoa's foot into the path of Roberto Firmino, who tapped the ball into an empty net from close range.[34][35]

Since the introduction of the round of 16 in 1986, Mexico have been eliminated at this stage of the World Cup seven times – more than twice as many as any other nation.[36] This was also Mexico's fourth defeat on the hand of Brazil, and moreover, Mexico had never scored a single goal against Brazil in the FIFA World Cup.

Brazil  2–0  Mexico
Report
Attendance: 41,970[37]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brazil[38]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mexico[38]
GK 1 Alisson
RB 22 Fagner
CB 2 Thiago Silva (c)
CB 3 Miranda
LB 6 Filipe Luís   43'
CM 15 Paulinho   80'
CM 5 Casemiro   59'
RW 19 Willian   90+1'
AM 11 Philippe Coutinho   86'
LW 10 Neymar
CF 9 Gabriel Jesus
Substitutions:
MF 17 Fernandinho   80'
FW 20 Roberto Firmino   86'
DF 13 Marquinhos   90+1'
Manager:
Tite
 
GK 13 Guillermo Ochoa
RB 21 Edson Álvarez   38'   55'
CB 2 Hugo Ayala
CB 3 Carlos Salcedo   77'
LB 23 Jesús Gallardo
CM 16 Héctor Herrera   55'
CM 4 Rafael Márquez (c)   46'
CM 18 Andrés Guardado   90+2'
RF 11 Carlos Vela
CF 14 Javier Hernández   60'
LF 22 Hirving Lozano
Substitutions:
MF 7 Miguel Layún   46'
MF 6 Jonathan dos Santos   55'
FW 9 Raúl Jiménez   60'
Manager:
  Juan Carlos Osorio

Man of the Match:
Neymar (Brazil)[39]

Assistant referees:[38]
Elenito Di Liberatore (Italy)
Mauro Tonolini (Italy)
Fourth official:
Antonio Mateu Lahoz (Spain)
Reserve assistant referee:
Pau Cebrián Devís (Spain)
Video assistant referee:
Massimiliano Irrati (Italy)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Paweł Gil (Poland)
Carlos Astroza (Chile)
Daniele Orsato (Italy)

Belgium vs JapanEdit

 
Belgium cornerback Jan Vertonghen in possession of the ball during the match.

The teams had faced each other in 5 previous matches, including one World Cup group stage match in 2002, which ended in a 2–2 draw. Their most recent meeting came in a friendly in 2017, a 1–0 Belgium win and also Belgium's first victory over Japan.[5]

In the 48th minute, Gaku Shibasaki slipped a pass through to Genki Haraguchi, who rifled a shot across Thibaut Courtois from the right which went into the left corner of the net. After 4 minutes, Japan scored a second, Shinji Kagawa collecting a loose ball and feeding Takashi Inui, the midfielder working himself a yard of space before arrowing home from 25-yards into the bottom right corner of the net. Jan Vertonghen's looping header from the left eluded goalkeeper Eiji Kawashima and landed in the right corner of the net after a corner caused chaos in the Japan penalty area – and five minutes later they were back on level terms. Eden Hazard twisted and turned to create space on the left wing, his cross delivered for Marouane Fellaini to climb above his marker and crash in a downward header. In the last minute of stoppage time, Courtois found Kevin De Bruyne with a long throw, who freed Thomas Meunier with a pass, Meunier squared a low cross from the right and, when Romelu Lukaku dummied the ball, substitute Nacer Chadli was on hand to complete the comeback for Belgium with a low finish.[40][41]

Belgium are the first team to come from two or more goals down to win a World Cup knockout stage match within 90 minutes since Portugal beat North Korea in the 1966 quarter-final (3–0 down, 5–3 win); and for the first time comeback from two goals down since West Germany's comeback 3–2 victory over England at 1970. Japan scored six goals at Russia 2018, their highest ever tally in a single World Cup tournament. Belgium have reached the World Cup quarter-finals in successive tournaments for the first time.[42]

Belgium  3–2  Japan
Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Belgium[44]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Japan[44]
GK 1 Thibaut Courtois
CB 2 Toby Alderweireld
CB 4 Vincent Kompany
CB 5 Jan Vertonghen
RM 15 Thomas Meunier
CM 7 Kevin De Bruyne
CM 6 Axel Witsel
LM 11 Yannick Carrasco   65'
RF 14 Dries Mertens   65'
CF 9 Romelu Lukaku
LF 10 Eden Hazard (c)
Substitutions:
MF 8 Marouane Fellaini   65'
MF 22 Nacer Chadli   65'
Manager:
  Roberto Martínez
 
GK 1 Eiji Kawashima
RB 19 Hiroki Sakai
CB 22 Maya Yoshida
CB 3 Gen Shoji
LB 5 Yuto Nagatomo
CM 17 Makoto Hasebe (c)
CM 7 Gaku Shibasaki   40'   81'
RW 8 Genki Haraguchi   81'
AM 10 Shinji Kagawa
LW 14 Takashi Inui
CF 15 Yuya Osako
Substitutions:
MF 16 Hotaru Yamaguchi   81'
MF 4 Keisuke Honda   81'
Manager:
Akira Nishino

Man of the Match:
Eden Hazard (Belgium)[45]

Assistant referees:[44]
Djibril Camara (Senegal)
El Hadji Samba (Senegal)
Fourth official:
Bakary Gassama (Gambia)
Reserve assistant referee:
Jean Claude Birumushahu (Burundi)
Video assistant referee:
Felix Zwayer (Germany)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Clément Turpin (France)
Mark Borsch (Germany)
Danny Makkelie (Netherlands)

Sweden vs SwitzerlandEdit

 
Marcus Berg (left) attempts to take possession of the ball away from Johan Djourou (right).

The teams had faced each other in 28 previous matches, which includes three matches in 1962 FIFA World Cup qualification, Switzerland winning twice (3–2 and 2–1) and Sweden winning once (4–0), and also twice in 1978 FIFA World Cup qualification, both matches ending in a 2–1 Sweden win.[5]

Stephan Lichtsteiner and Fabian Schär were both ruled out through suspension. Albin Ekdal's volley missed the target prior to the break from a Mikael Lustig cross. Ola Toivonen fired over when well positioned inside the penalty area before Emil Forsberg finally broke the deadlock, his right foot shot from just outside the penalty area clipping Manuel Akanji to beat Yann Sommer. Switzerland sent on forwards Breel Embolo and Haris Seferović, and the latter tested Sweden goalkeeper Robin Olsen with a header in the closing stages. Sweden were denied the chance to double their lead from the spot following Michael Lang's late dismissal for taking out Martin Olsson, with Sommer beating away Toivonen's driven free-kick after a lengthy delay.[46][47]

Sweden have qualified for their first World Cup quarter-final since 1994. Sweden have won back-to-back World Cup matches for the first time since 1958, when they won the quarter-final and semi-final on their way to the final as host nation that year. Olsen has kept three clean sheets at Russia 2018, a joint-record for a Swedish goalkeeper in World Cup finals history (also three clean sheets for Ronnie Hellström in 1974 and Kalle Svensson in 1958).[48]

Sweden  1–0   Switzerland
Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sweden[50]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Switzerland[50]
GK 1 Robin Olsen
RB 2 Mikael Lustig   31'   82'
CB 3 Victor Lindelöf
CB 4 Andreas Granqvist (c)
LB 6 Ludwig Augustinsson
RM 17 Viktor Claesson
CM 13 Gustav Svensson
CM 8 Albin Ekdal
LM 10 Emil Forsberg   82'
CF 9 Marcus Berg   90+1'
CF 20 Ola Toivonen
Substitutions:
DF 5 Martin Olsson   82'
DF 16 Emil Krafth   82'
FW 22 Isaac Kiese Thelin   90+1'
Manager:
Janne Andersson
 
GK 1 Yann Sommer
RB 6 Michael Lang   90+4'
CB 20 Johan Djourou
CB 5 Manuel Akanji
LB 13 Ricardo Rodríguez
CM 11 Valon Behrami (c)   61'
CM 10 Granit Xhaka   68'
RW 23 Xherdan Shaqiri
AM 15 Blerim Džemaili   73'
LW 14 Steven Zuber   73'
CF 19 Josip Drmić
Substitutions:
FW 7 Breel Embolo   73'
FW 9 Haris Seferović   73'
Manager:
Vladimir Petković

Man of the Match:
Emil Forsberg (Sweden)[51]

Assistant referees:[50]
Jure Praprotnik (Slovenia)
Robert Vukan (Slovenia)
Fourth official:
Nawaf Shukralla (Bahrain)
Reserve assistant referee:
Yaser Tulefat (Bahrain)
Video assistant referee:
Daniele Orsato (Italy)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Bastian Dankert (Germany)
Roberto Díaz Pérez (Spain)
Massimiliano Irrati (Italy)

Colombia vs EnglandEdit

 
Eric Dier scores the winning goal in England's first World Cup penalty shoot-out victory, having lost thrice before.

The teams had faced each other in five previous matches, including one World Cup group stage match in 1998, a 2–0 England win. Their most recent meeting came in a friendly in 2005, a 3–2 England win.[5]

In the 16th minute, Harry Kane arrived beyond the back post to meet a Kieran Trippier cross, but was unable to direct his header on target. Wílmar Barrios was booked when he appeared to headbutt Jordan Henderson in the build-up to a free-kick Trippier bent narrowly wide. Colombia gave away a penalty early in the second half when Carlos Sánchez dragged Kane down in the box after a corner from the right. Kane scored from 12 yards, shooting down the middle to give England the lead. Colombia forced their way into extra-time, Yerry Mina scoring a downward header from a Juan Cuadrado corner from the right. Eric Dier scored the final penalty in the shoot-out, England came from 3–2 down after Mateus Uribe and Carlos Bacca failed to convert their spot-kicks.[52][53]

This was the first time that England had won a penalty shoot-out at the FIFA World Cup, and only the second time they had won on penalties at any major tournament (the previous occasion being against Spain at Euro 1996). Kane became the first player to score in six consecutive England appearances since Tommy Lawton did so in 1939. England conceded in injury time at the end of the second half for the first time in World Cup history, with Mina's goal coming after 92 minutes and 33 seconds.[54]

Colombia  1–1 (a.e.t.)  England
Report
Penalties
3–4
Attendance: 44,190[55]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Colombia[56]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
England[56]
GK 1 David Ospina
RB 4 Santiago Arias   52'   116'
CB 13 Yerry Mina
CB 23 Dávinson Sánchez
LB 17 Johan Mojica
CM 5 Wílmar Barrios   41'
CM 6 Carlos Sánchez   54'   79'
CM 16 Jefferson Lerma   61'
RW 11 Juan Cuadrado   118'
LW 20 Juan Fernando Quintero   88'
CF 9 Radamel Falcao (c)   63'
Substitutions:
FW 7 Carlos Bacca   64'   61'
MF 15 Mateus Uribe   79'
FW 14 Luis Muriel   88'
DF 2 Cristián Zapata   116'
Manager:
  José Pékerman
 
GK 1 Jordan Pickford
CB 2 Kyle Walker   113'
CB 5 John Stones
CB 6 Harry Maguire
DM 8 Jordan Henderson   56'
CM 20 Dele Alli   81'
CM 7 Jesse Lingard   69'
RM 12 Kieran Trippier
LM 18 Ashley Young   102'
CF 10 Raheem Sterling   88'
CF 9 Harry Kane (c)
Substitutions:
MF 4 Eric Dier   81'
FW 11 Jamie Vardy   88'
DF 3 Danny Rose   102'
FW 19 Marcus Rashford   113'
Manager:
Gareth Southgate

Man of the Match:
Harry Kane (England)[57]

Assistant referees:[56]
Joe Fletcher (Canada)
Frank Anderson (United States)
Fourth official:
Matthew Conger (New Zealand)
Reserve assistant referee:
Tevita Makasini (Tonga)
Video assistant referee:
Danny Makkelie (Netherlands)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Paweł Gil (Poland)
Carlos Astroza (Chile)
Mauro Vigliano (Argentina)

Quarter-finalsEdit

Uruguay vs FranceEdit

The teams had met in eight previous matches including three times in the FIFA World Cup group stage, one won by Uruguay and the other two ending in a draw (2–1 in 1966, 0–0 in 2002 and 0–0 in 2010).[5]

In the 15th minute, after latching on to Olivier Giroud's knockdown in the box, Kylian Mbappé headed the ball over Fernando Muslera's crossbar. Five minutes before the break, Antoine Griezmann's inswinging free-kick from the right was met by Raphaël Varane, who headed the ball into the bottom left corner. Four minutes later, Martín Cáceres' header was saved by Hugo Lloris low to his right and Diego Godín shot the rebound over. In the 61st minute, Griezmann's left footed shot from outside the penalty area slipped through Muslera's hands and into the net as France doubled their lead.[58] Mbappé went down softly under a challenge from Cristian Rodríguez, prompting angry confrontations involving Godín, Nahitan Nández and Paul Pogba. In the 73rd minute, Corentin Tolisso's shot curled over, while Griezmann also flashed a late free-kick over the top.[59]

France have become only the second team to beat three different South American sides in a single World Cup tournament, after the Netherlands in 1974. France are unbeaten in 10 World Cup matches against South American sides (W6 D4), since a 2–1 loss v Argentina in 1978 – the joint longest run alongside Italy (1982 to 2010).[60]

Uruguay  0–2  France
Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Uruguay[62]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
France[62]
GK 1 Fernando Muslera
RB 22 Martín Cáceres
CB 2 José Giménez
CB 3 Diego Godín (c)
LB 17 Diego Laxalt
RM 8 Nahitan Nández   73'
CM 14 Lucas Torreira
CM 15 Matías Vecino
LM 6 Rodrigo Bentancur   38'   59'
CF 9 Luis Suárez
CF 11 Cristhian Stuani   59'
Substitutions:
FW 18 Maxi Gómez   59'
MF 7 Cristian Rodríguez   69'   59'
FW 20 Jonathan Urretaviscaya   73'
Manager:
Óscar Tabárez
 
GK 1 Hugo Lloris (c)
RB 2 Benjamin Pavard
CB 4 Raphaël Varane
CB 5 Samuel Umtiti
LB 21 Lucas Hernández   33'
CM 6 Paul Pogba
CM 13 N'Golo Kanté
RW 10 Kylian Mbappé   69'   88'
AM 7 Antoine Griezmann   90+3'
LW 12 Corentin Tolisso   80'
CF 9 Olivier Giroud
Substitutions:
MF 15 Steven Nzonzi   80'
FW 11 Ousmane Dembélé   88'
FW 18 Nabil Fekir   90+3'
Manager:
Didier Deschamps

Man of the Match:
Antoine Griezmann (France)[63]

Assistant referees:[62]
Hernán Maidana (Argentina)
Juan Pablo Belatti (Argentina)
Fourth official:
Alireza Faghani (Iran)
Reserve assistant referee:
Reza Sokhandan (Iran)
Video assistant referee:
Massimiliano Irrati (Italy)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Mauro Vigliano (Argentina)
Carlos Astroza (Chile)
Paolo Valeri (Italy)

Brazil vs BelgiumEdit

 
Belgium forward Kevin De Bruyne celebrating after the conclusion of the match.

The teams had met in four previous matches. Their most recent meeting came in a World Cup knockout stage match in 2002, Brazil winning 2–0 to advance to the quarter-finals. That match was also the only time the two sides had previously met in a World Cup.[5]

Belgium scored from their first corner of the game in the 13th minute, Vincent Kompany flicked on Eden Hazard's left-wing delivery but the decisive touch came from Fernandinho, who turned the ball past Alisson via his arm. Belgium doubled their lead by breaking from a Brazil corner in the 31st minute, Kevin De Bruyne arrowed a right foot drive across Alisson and into the left corner of the net from the edge of the penalty area after Romelu Lukaku collected the ball, turned and embarked on a 40-yard run with a pass at the end to free De Bruyne. Brazil's third change yielded a goal three minutes and 14 seconds after his introduction, Renato Augusto gliding between two Belgium defenders to nod a flicked header past Thibaut Courtois from a Philippe Coutinho cross. Coutinho's first-time shot flew wide and yet another Neymar penalty appeal was rejected, before he drew a fingertip save from Courtois in the 94th minute.[64]

De Bruyne became the 100th player to score at Russia 2018 (excluding own goals).[65] Belgium have reached the World Cup semi-finals for only the second time, losing out to eventual winners Argentina in 1986. Belgium's victory was only their second ever against Brazil, and first since a 1963 friendly match in Brussels.[66] This was the first time in 30 matches in all competitions that Brazil had conceded more than once in a game, since a 2–2 draw with Paraguay in March 2016.[64]

Brazil  1–2  Belgium
Report
Attendance: 42,873[67]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brazil[68]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Belgium[68]
GK 1 Alisson
RB 22 Fagner   90'
CB 2 Thiago Silva
CB 3 Miranda (c)
LB 12 Marcelo
CM 15 Paulinho   73'
CM 17 Fernandinho   85'
RW 19 Willian   46'
AM 11 Philippe Coutinho
LW 10 Neymar
CF 9 Gabriel Jesus   58'
Substitutions:
FW 20 Roberto Firmino   46'
FW 7 Douglas Costa   58'
MF 8 Renato Augusto   73'
Manager:
Tite
 
GK 1 Thibaut Courtois
CB 2 Toby Alderweireld   47'
CB 4 Vincent Kompany
CB 5 Jan Vertonghen
RM 15 Thomas Meunier   71'
CM 8 Marouane Fellaini
CM 6 Axel Witsel
LM 22 Nacer Chadli   83'
RF 7 Kevin De Bruyne
CF 9 Romelu Lukaku   87'
LF 10 Eden Hazard (c)
Substitutions:
DF 3 Thomas Vermaelen   83'
MF 17 Youri Tielemans   87'
Manager:
  Roberto Martínez

Man of the Match:
Kevin De Bruyne (Belgium)[69]

Assistant referees:[68]
Milovan Ristić (Serbia)
Dalibor Đurđević (Serbia)
Fourth official:
Jair Marrufo (United States)
Reserve assistant referee:
Corey Rockwell (United States)
Video assistant referee:
Daniele Orsato (Italy)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Paweł Gil (Poland)
Mark Borsch (Germany)
Felix Zwayer (Germany)

Sweden vs EnglandEdit

The teams had faced each other in 23 previous matches, including two times in the group stage of the World Cup, both matches ending in a draw (1–1 in 2002 and 2–2 in 2006). Their most recent meeting came in a friendly in 2012, a 4–2 Sweden win.[5]

England took the lead in the 30th minute, Ashley Young's outswinging corner from the left found Harry Maguire, goalkeeper Robin Olsen and Ola Toivonen on the line were unable to stop the defender's downward header. Olsen did well with a strong hand to deny Raheem Sterling, who dallied with the rebound and allowed Andreas Granqvist to make a vital block. Shortly after the restart, Jordan Pickford dived to his left to palm away a header from Marcus Berg, who climbed above Young at the back post. In the 58th minute, another England set-piece caused chaos and, although Sweden initially cleared their lines when Jesse Lingard delivered a cross from the right to the back post, Dele Alli was there to double his side's advantage with a header. John Guidetti teed up strike partner Berg in the 71st minute, but Pickford tipped the effort over the crossbar.[70]

Alli's goal was England's 11th at Russia 2018, equalling the country's record of most goals at a single World Cup set in 1966.[71] Alli is the second youngest player to score for England at the World Cup (22 years and 87 days), behind only Michael Owen (18 years and 190 days against Romania in 1998). Maguire became the first player to score their first England goal in a World Cup knockout match since Rio Ferdinand in 2002 against Denmark. Pickford made three saves in this match and became the youngest England goalkeeper to keep a clean sheet in a World Cup match (24 years and 122 days).[72] England qualified for their first World Cup semi-final since 1990.[73]

Sweden  0–2  England
Report
Attendance: 39,991[74]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sweden[75]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
England[75]
GK 1 Robin Olsen
RB 16 Emil Krafth   85'
CB 3 Victor Lindelöf
CB 4 Andreas Granqvist (c)
LB 6 Ludwig Augustinsson
RM 17 Viktor Claesson
CM 7 Sebastian Larsson   90+4'
CM 8 Albin Ekdal
LM 10 Emil Forsberg   65'
CF 9 Marcus Berg
CF 20 Ola Toivonen   65'
Substitutions:
FW 11 John Guidetti   87'   65'
DF 5 Martin Olsson   65'
DF 18 Pontus Jansson   85'
Manager:
Janne Andersson
 
GK 1 Jordan Pickford
CB 2 Kyle Walker
CB 5 John Stones
CB 6 Harry Maguire   87'
DM 8 Jordan Henderson   85'
CM 20 Dele Alli   77'
CM 7 Jesse Lingard
RM 12 Kieran Trippier
LM 18 Ashley Young
CF 10 Raheem Sterling   90+1'
CF 9 Harry Kane (c)
Substitutions:
DF 17 Fabian Delph   77'
MF 4 Eric Dier   85'
FW 19 Marcus Rashford   90+1'
Manager:
Gareth Southgate

Man of the Match:
Jordan Pickford (England)[76]

Assistant referees:[75]
Sander van Roekel (Netherlands)
Erwin Zeinstra (Netherlands)
Fourth official:
Antonio Mateu Lahoz (Spain)
Reserve assistant referee:
Pau Cebrián Devís (Spain)
Video assistant referee:
Danny Makkelie (Netherlands)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Bastian Dankert (Germany)
Carlos Astroza (Chile)
Felix Zwayer (Germany)

Russia vs CroatiaEdit

 
Mario Mandžukić (left) makes a cross to Andrej Kramarić (off screen to right), who would then head the ball into the goal to equalise in the 39th minute.

The teams had faced each other in three previous matches. Their most recent meeting came in a friendly in 2015, a 3–1 Croatia win.[5]

In the 31st minute, Denis Cheryshev came in from the left and, after a one-two with Artem Dzyuba, skipped away from Luka Modrić to curl a left foot effort beyond Danijel Subašić and into the left of the net. Six minutes before half-time, Mario Mandžukić advanced down the left to set up the chance for Andrej Kramarić to head home the equaliser. In the first period of extra time, Croatia took the lead as Domagoj Vida nodded down past Igor Akinfeev and into the right corner of the net after a corner from the right. Mário Fernandes drew his team level, converting Alan Dzagoev's free-kick with a glancing header to the left corner of the net after a free-kick from the right. Penalties were required and while Fyodor Smolov's Panenka attempt with the first effort was foiled by Subašić, parity was restored when Akinfeev got down to his left to keep out Mateo Kovačić's second kick for Croatia. After Fernandes' failure, Modrić's strike found the net, following touches off Akinfeev's glove and the post. The decisive penalty fell to Ivan Rakitić, who rolled the ball into the bottom-left corner to give Croatia the win.[77]

Russia became the first country in World Cup history to contest two shoot-outs while hosting the event.[78] There were three headed goals in this match – the most in a World Cup match since Germany 8–0 Saudi Arabia in 2002 (5 headers).[79] Croatia are the second team to win two penalty shootouts at a single World Cup tournament – the other was Argentina in 1990 (against Yugoslavia and Italy). Croatia has qualified for the semifinal for the first time since 1998 (their first World Cup tournament).[80]

Russia  2–2 (a.e.t.)  Croatia
Report
Penalties
3–4
Attendance: 44,287[81]
Referee: Sandro Ricci (Brazil)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Russia[82]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Croatia[82]
GK 1 Igor Akinfeev (c)
RB 2 Mário Fernandes
CB 3 Ilya Kutepov
CB 4 Sergei Ignashevich
LB 13 Fyodor Kudryashov
CM 11 Roman Zobnin
CM 7 Daler Kuzyayev
RW 19 Aleksandr Samedov   54'
AM 17 Aleksandr Golovin   102'
LW 6 Denis Cheryshev   67'
CF 22 Artem Dzyuba   79'
Substitutions:
MF 21 Aleksandr Yerokhin   54'
FW 10 Fyodor Smolov   67'
MF 8 Yury Gazinsky   109'   79'
MF 9 Alan Dzagoev   102'
Manager:
Stanislav Cherchesov
 
GK 23 Danijel Subašić
RB 2 Šime Vrsaljko   97'
CB 6 Dejan Lovren   35'
CB 21 Domagoj Vida   101'
LB 3 Ivan Strinić   38'   74'
CM 7 Ivan Rakitić
CM 10 Luka Modrić (c)
RW 18 Ante Rebić
AM 9 Andrej Kramarić   88'
LW 4 Ivan Perišić   63'
CF 17 Mario Mandžukić
Substitutions:
MF 11 Marcelo Brozović   63'
DF 22 Josip Pivarić   114'   74'
MF 8 Mateo Kovačić   88'
DF 5 Vedran Ćorluka   97'
Manager:
Zlatko Dalić

Man of the Match:
Luka Modrić (Croatia)[83]

Assistant referees:[82]
Emerson de Carvalho (Brazil)
Marcelo Van Gasse (Brazil)
Fourth official:
Janny Sikazwe (Zambia)
Reserve assistant referee:
Jerson Dos Santos (Angola)
Video assistant referee:
Massimiliano Irrati (Italy)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Wilton Sampaio (Brazil)
Roberto Díaz Pérez (Spain)
Paolo Valeri (Italy)

Semi-finalsEdit

For the first time since 1966, all multiple World Cup winners were eliminated before the semi-final stage. This is only the second time that neither Brazil nor Germany were in the last four, the other being the inaugural 1930 tournament.[84] With Uruguay and Brazil eliminated in the quarter-finals, an all-European semi-final line up was completed for the fifth time (after the 1934, 1966, 1982, and 2006 tournaments). This also ensured that a European side would win the World Cup for the fourth tournament in a row.[85]

France vs BelgiumEdit

The teams had faced each other in 73 previous matches, including two times in the World Cup, France winning both matches (3–1 in the round of 16 in 1938 and 4–2 in the third place play-off in 1986). Their most recent meeting came in a friendly in 2015, a 4–3 Belgium win.[5]

Eden Hazard twice went close, narrowly missing the target with a low, left-footed drive before seeing a curler with his right deflected over the crossbar by the head of Raphaël Varane. Hugo Lloris' full-length dive kept out a first-time strike on the turn from Toby Alderweireld, while Thibaut Courtois blocked Benjamin Pavard's attempt from a tight angle on the right at the other end. Six minutes after the break, Vincent Kompany's block turned away Olivier Giroud's shot, and Antoine Griezmann's inswinging delivery from the right to the front post was turned in by Samuel Umtiti, who outjumped his marker, Marouane Fellaini, to head beyond Courtois. Dries Mertens's cross from the right flank saw Fellaini narrowly miss the target with a header. Axel Witsel's long-range drive was pushed away by Lloris as France secured their place into the finals.[86]

Didier Deschamps has now managed more games for France at the World Cup than any other previous France manager, overtaking Raymond Domenech and Michel Hidalgo after this match.[87] This was Belgium's first defeat of any kind since a friendly loss against Spain in September 2016. France have reached their third World Cup final, also doing so in 1998 and 2006. Only Germany (8) and Italy (6) have reached more among European nations.[88]

France  1–0  Belgium
Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
France[90]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Belgium[90]
GK 1 Hugo Lloris (c)
RB 2 Benjamin Pavard
CB 4 Raphaël Varane
CB 5 Samuel Umtiti
LB 21 Lucas Hernández
CM 6 Paul Pogba
CM 13 N'Golo Kanté   87'
RW 10 Kylian Mbappé   90+3'
AM 7 Antoine Griezmann
LW 14 Blaise Matuidi   86'
CF 9 Olivier Giroud   85'
Substitutions:
MF 15 Steven Nzonzi   85'
MF 12 Corentin Tolisso   86'
Manager:
Didier Deschamps
 
GK 1 Thibaut Courtois
CB 2 Toby Alderweireld   71'
CB 4 Vincent Kompany
CB 5 Jan Vertonghen   90+4'
DM 6 Axel Witsel
CM 19 Mousa Dembélé   60'
CM 8 Marouane Fellaini   80'
RM 22 Nacer Chadli   90+1'
LM 7 Kevin De Bruyne
CF 9 Romelu Lukaku
CF 10 Eden Hazard (c)   63'
Substitutions:
FW 14 Dries Mertens   60'
MF 11 Yannick Carrasco   80'
FW 21 Michy Batshuayi   90+1'
Manager:
  Roberto Martínez

Man of the Match:
Samuel Umtiti (France)[91]

Assistant referees:[90]
Nicolás Tarán (Uruguay)
Mauricio Espinosa (Uruguay)
Fourth official:
César Arturo Ramos (Mexico)
Reserve assistant referee:
Marvin Torrentera (Mexico)
Video assistant referee:
Massimiliano Irrati (Italy)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Mauro Vigliano (Argentina)
Roberto Díaz Pérez (Spain)
Paolo Valeri (Italy)

Croatia vs EnglandEdit

 
The Croatian team and their supporters celebrate after Ivan Perišić's equalising goal in the 68th minute.

The teams had faced each other in seven previous matches, which includes two matches played in the 2010 FIFA World Cup qualification, England winning on both occasions (4–1 and 5–1).[5]

Luka Modrić stopped a Dele Alli run, by fouling him at the edge of the area. Kieran Trippier found the top right corner of the net from the resulting free kick with his right foot. After half-time, Ivan Perišić met Šime Vrsaljko's deep cross from the right with a flying left-footed finish to the left of the net. Soon after, Perišić shot against the right-hand post from the left before Ante Rebić put the rebound into Jordan Pickford's hands. In extra-time, John Stones had a header cleared off the line by Vrsaljko in the 98th minute. Pickford at the other end, denied Mario Mandžukić at point-blank range after the striker met Perišić's cross from the left. But Mandžukić came out on top soon after the break, latching on to Perišić's headed pass on the left and sending a left-footed effort across Pickford to find the bottom-right corner, securing Croatia's entrance into their first ever World Cup final.[92]

Croatia are the first team to avoid defeat after trailing in three knockout matches at a single World Cup. They become the 13th different nation to reach their first World Cup Final.[93] Trippier became the first player to score a direct free-kick for England at the World Cup since David Beckham in 2006 against Ecuador. Trippier's goal after four minutes and 44 seconds was the fastest goal scored in a World Cup semi-final since 1958 (Vavá after two minutes for Brazil v France). Croatia became the first team to play extra time in three consecutive World Cup matches since England in 1990. England scored nine goals from set-pieces at the 2018 World Cup – the most by a team in a single World Cup tournament since 1966.[94]

Croatia  2–1 (a.e.t.)  England
Report
Attendance: 78,011[95]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Croatia[96]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
England[96]
GK 23 Danijel Subašić
RB 2 Šime Vrsaljko
CB 6 Dejan Lovren
CB 21 Domagoj Vida
LB 3 Ivan Strinić   95'
CM 7 Ivan Rakitić
CM 11 Marcelo Brozović
RW 18 Ante Rebić   96'   101'
AM 10 Luka Modrić (c)   119'
LW 4 Ivan Perišić
CF 17 Mario Mandžukić   48'   115'
Substitutions:
DF 22 Josip Pivarić   95'
FW 9 Andrej Kramarić   101'
DF 5 Vedran Ćorluka   115'
MF 19 Milan Badelj   119'
Manager:
Zlatko Dalić
 
GK 1 Jordan Pickford
CB 2 Kyle Walker   54'   112'
CB 5 John Stones
CB 6 Harry Maguire
DM 8 Jordan Henderson   97'
CM 20 Dele Alli
CM 7 Jesse Lingard
RM 12 Kieran Trippier
LM 18 Ashley Young   91'
CF 10 Raheem Sterling   74'
CF 9 Harry Kane (c)
Substitutions:
FW 19 Marcus Rashford   74'
DF 3 Danny Rose   91'
MF 4 Eric Dier   97'
FW 11 Jamie Vardy   112'
Manager:
Gareth Southgate

Man of the Match:
Ivan Perišić (Croatia)[97]

Assistant referees:[96]
Bahattin Duran (Turkey)
Tarık Ongun (Turkey)
Fourth official:
Björn Kuipers (Netherlands)
Reserve assistant referee:
Sander van Roekel (Netherlands)
Video assistant referee:
Danny Makkelie (Netherlands)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Bastian Dankert (Germany)
Carlos Astroza (Chile)
Felix Zwayer (Germany)

Third place play-offEdit

The two teams had met in 22 matches, including three matches at the World Cup, one round of 16 game at the 1990 FIFA World Cup which ended in a 1–0 victory for England, one group stage game at the 1954 FIFA World Cup which ended in a 4–4 draw and their most recent encounter in Group G of this tournament which Belgium won 1–0.[5]

After four minutes, Thomas Meunier raced into the box to get across Danny Rose and tucked home Nacer Chadli's low cross in from the left from six yards out. Harry Kane scuffed wide of the left post, from a Raheem Sterling lay-off. In the 70th minute, Eric Dier burst through for a one-on-one and dinked over Thibaut Courtois, only to see a retreating Toby Alderweireld hack the ball off the line. Jordan Pickford made a one-handed save to deny Meunier in the 80th minute. Eden Hazard scored the second with a near-post finish with his right foot, having been sent clean through by Kevin De Bruyne.[98]

Meunier was the 10th player to score for Belgium at Russia 2018. No other team has had more, equalling France in 1982 and Italy in 2006.[99] This is Belgium's best finish at a World Cup, having previously finished fourth in 1986. This was England's 100th match at a major tournament – 69 at the World Cup, 31 at the European Championship. Since 1966, no player has been involved in more World Cup goals for Belgium than Hazard (seven – three goals and four assists), level with Jan Ceulemans (also four goals and three assists).[100]

Belgium  2–0  England
Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Belgium[102]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
England[102]
GK 1 Thibaut Courtois
CB 2 Toby Alderweireld
CB 4 Vincent Kompany
CB 5 Jan Vertonghen
RM 15 Thomas Meunier
CM 17 Youri Tielemans   78'
CM 6 Axel Witsel   90+3'
LM 22 Nacer Chadli   39'
RF 7 Kevin De Bruyne
CF 9 Romelu Lukaku   60'
LF 10 Eden Hazard (c)
Substitutions:
DF 3 Thomas Vermaelen   39'
FW 14 Dries Mertens   60'
MF 19 Mousa Dembélé   78'
Manager:
  Roberto Martínez
 
GK 1 Jordan Pickford
CB 16 Phil Jones
CB 5 John Stones   52'
CB 6 Harry Maguire   76'
DM 4 Eric Dier
CM 21 Ruben Loftus-Cheek   84'
CM 17 Fabian Delph
RM 12 Kieran Trippier
LM 3 Danny Rose   46'
CF 10 Raheem Sterling   46'
CF 9 Harry Kane (c)
Substitutions:
MF 7 Jesse Lingard   46'
FW 19 Marcus Rashford   46'
MF 20 Dele Alli   84'
Manager:
Gareth Southgate

Man of the Match:
Eden Hazard (Belgium)[103]

Assistant referees:[102]
Reza Sokhandan (Iran)
Mohammadreza Mansouri (Iran)
Fourth official:
Malang Diedhiou (Senegal)
Reserve assistant referee:
Djibril Camara (Senegal)
Video assistant referee:
Mark Geiger (United States)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Bastian Dankert (Germany)
Joe Fletcher (Canada)
Paolo Valeri (Italy)

FinalEdit

The match was the sixth meeting between France and Croatia, with France undefeated in the previous fixtures with three wins and two draws. The two sides first met in the 1998 World Cup semi-final, with hosts France winning 2–1. Their only other competitive meeting was during the group stage of Euro 2004, which finished as a 2–2 draw. Their next and most recent meeting was in a March 2011 friendly match, which finished as a 0–0 draw.[5]

France  4–2  Croatia
Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
France[105]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Croatia[105]
GK 1 Hugo Lloris (c)
RB 2 Benjamin Pavard
CB 4 Raphaël Varane
CB 5 Samuel Umtiti
LB 21 Lucas Hernández   41'
CM 6 Paul Pogba
CM 13 N'Golo Kanté   27'   55'
RW 10 Kylian Mbappé
AM 7 Antoine Griezmann
LW 14 Blaise Matuidi   73'
CF 9 Olivier Giroud   81'
Substitutions:
MF 15 Steven Nzonzi   55'
MF 12 Corentin Tolisso   73'
FW 18 Nabil Fekir   81'
Manager:
Didier Deschamps
 
GK 23 Danijel Subašić
RB 2 Šime Vrsaljko   90+2'
CB 6 Dejan Lovren
CB 21 Domagoj Vida
LB 3 Ivan Strinić   81'
CM 7 Ivan Rakitić
CM 11 Marcelo Brozović
RW 18 Ante Rebić   71'
AM 10 Luka Modrić (c)
LW 4 Ivan Perišić
CF 17 Mario Mandžukić
Substitutions:
FW 9 Andrej Kramarić   71'
FW 20 Marko Pjaca   81'
Manager:
Zlatko Dalić

Man of the Match:
Antoine Griezmann (France)[106]

Assistant referees:[105]
Hernán Maidana (Argentina)
Juan Pablo Belatti (Argentina)
Fourth official:
Björn Kuipers (Netherlands)
Reserve assistant referee:
Erwin Zeinstra (Netherlands)
Video assistant referee:
Massimiliano Irrati (Italy)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Mauro Vigliano (Argentina)
Carlos Astroza (Chile)
Danny Makkelie (Netherlands)

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit