1934 FIFA World Cup final tournament

The final tournament of the 1934 FIFA World Cup was a single-elimination tournament involving the 16 teams which qualified for the tournament. The tournament began with the round of 16 on 27 May and concluded with the final on 10 June 1934. Italy won the final 2–1 for their first World Cup title.[1]

BracketEdit

 
Round of 16Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
              
 
27 May – Rome
 
 
  Italy7
 
31 May and 1 June – Florence
 
  United States1
 
  Italy1 (1)
 
27 May – Genoa
 
  Spain1 (0)
 
  Spain3
 
3 June – Milan
 
  Brazil1
 
  Italy1
 
27 May – Turin
 
  Austria0
 
  Austria (aet)3
 
31 May – Bologna
 
  France2
 
  Austria2
 
27 May – Naples
 
  Hungary1
 
  Hungary4
 
10 June – Rome
 
  Egypt2
 
  Italy (aet)2
 
27 May – Trieste
 
  Czechoslovakia1
 
  Czechoslovakia2
 
31 May – Turin
 
  Romania1
 
  Czechoslovakia3
 
27 May – Milan
 
   Switzerland2
 
   Switzerland3
 
3 June – Rome
 
  Netherlands2
 
  Czechoslovakia3
 
27 May – Florence
 
  Germany1 Third place
 
  Germany5
 
31 May – Milan7 June – Naples
 
  Belgium2
 
  Germany2  Germany3
 
27 May – Bologna
 
  Sweden1   Austria2
 
  Sweden3
 
 
  Argentina2
 

Round of 16Edit

Spain vs BrazilEdit

Brazil – who had only kept Carvalho Leite from the squad participating in the previous edition of the World Cup – were outclassed by Spain in the first half, who scored thrice. In the second half, Spanish players played more complacently. Leônidas pulled one back for Brazil, then he scored again moments later, but the goal was disallowed for offside. Later, Ricardo Zamora saved a penalty from Waldemar de Brito.[2]

Spain  3–1  Brazil
Iraragorri   18' (pen.)25'
Lángara   29'
Report Leônidas   55'
Attendance: 21,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Spain
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brazil
GK Ricardo Zamora (c)
RB Ciriaco
LB Jacinto Quincoces
RH Leonardo Cilaurren
CH José Muguerza
LH Martín Marculeta
OR Lafuente
IR José Iraragorri
IL Simón Lecue
OL Guillermo Gorostiza
CF Isidro Lángara
Manager:
Amadeo García
 
GK Roberto Gomes Pedrosa
RB Sylvio Hoffmann
LB Luiz Luz
RH Alfredo Alves Tinoco
CH Martim Mércio da Silveira (c)
LH Heitor Canalli
OR Luisinho
IR Waldemar de Brito
IL Leônidas
OL Patesko
CF Armandinho
Manager:
Luiz Vinhaes

Assistant referees:
Ettore Carminati (Italy)
Mihály Ivanicsics (Hungary)

Hungary vs EgyptEdit

Hungary scored twice in 31 minutes. Rather than being disheartened, Egypt showed a positive attitude and leveled with two goals from Abdulrahman Fawzi. In the second half, Hungary played better and dictated the tempo, scoring two more goals and deserving to reach the quarter-finals.[2]

Hungary  4–2  Egypt
Teleki   11'
Toldi   31'61'
Vincze   53'
Report Fawzi   35'39'
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hungary
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Egypt
GK Antal Szabó
RB Gyula Futó
LB László Sternberg (c)
RH István Palotás
CH György Szűcs
LH Gyula Lázár
OR Imre Markos
IR Jenő Vincze
IL Géza Toldi
OL Gábor P. Szabó
CF Pál Teleki
Manager:
Ödön Nádas
 
GK Mustafa Mansour
RB Ali El-Kaf
LB Ibrahim Abdel Hamidu Sharli
RH Hassan El-Far
CH Ismail Rafaat
LH Hassan Raghab
OR Mohamed Latif
IR Abdulrahman Fawzi
IL Mostafa Taha
OL Mohammed Hassan
CF Mahmoud Mokhtar El-Tetsh (c)
Manager:
James McCrae

Assistant referees:
Generoso Dattilo (Italy)
Otello Sassi (Italy)

Switzerland vs NetherlandsEdit

Netherlands were narrowly defeated by Switzerland. Switerzland took an early lead thanks to Leopold Kielholz finishing off a good piece of play from André Abegglen. Netherlands equalised with Kick Smit, who converted a free-kick by Puck van Heel. Kielholz restored the Swiss advantage before half-time with a long-range effort. After the interval, the lead was extended thanks to Abegglen's goal. Netherlands frequently threatened the Swiss goal, scoring one from a free-kick, but Switzerland held on for the victory.[2]

Switzerland   3–2  Netherlands
Kielholz   7'43'
Abegglen   66'
Report Smit   29'
Vente   69'
Attendance: 33,000
Referee: Ivan Eklind (Sweden)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Switzerland
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Netherlands
GK Frank Séchehaye
RB Severino Minelli (c)
LB Walter Weiler
RH Albert Guinchard
CH Fernand Jaccard
LH Ernst Hufschmid
OR Willy von Känel
IR Raymond Passello
IL André Abegglen
OL Joseph Bossi
CF Leopold Kielholz
Manager:
Heinrich Müller
 
GK Gejus van der Meulen
RB Mauk Weber
LB Sjef van Run
RH Henk Pellikaan
CH Wim Anderiesen
LH Puck van Heel (c)
OR Frank Wels
IR Leen Vente
IL Kick Smit
OL Joop van Nellen
CF Beb Bakhuys
Manager:
Bob Glendenning

Assistant referees:
Alois Beranek (Austria)
Ferruccio Bonivento (Italy)

Italy vs United StatesEdit

A superior Italian team had a comfortable victory against the United States, which had played against Mexico in the qualifying just three days earlier. Schiavo scored two goals in the first half, one of which was from more than 30 yards out. A good performance from the US goalkeeper Julius Hjulian did not prevent Italy scoring seven goals before the final whistle.[2]

Italy  7–1  United States
Schiavio   18'29'64'
Orsi   20'69'
Ferrari   63'
Meazza   90'
Report Donelli   57'
Attendance: 25,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Italy
 
 
 
 
 
 
United States
GK Gianpiero Combi
RB Virginio Rosetta (c)
LB Luigi Allemandi
RH Mario Pizziolo
CH Luis Monti
LH Luigi Bertolini
OR Anfilogino Guarisi
IR Giuseppe Meazza
IL Giovanni Ferrari
OL Raimundo Orsi
CF Angelo Schiavio
Manager:
Vittorio Pozzo
 
GK Julius Hjulian
RB Ed Czerkiewicz
LB George Moorhouse (c)
RH Peter Pietras
CH Billy Gonsalves
LH Tom Florie
OR Francis Ryan
IR Werner Nilsen
IL Walter Dick
OL Willie McLean
CF Aldo Donelli
Manager:
David Gould

Assistant referees:
Pedro Escartín (Spain)
Bohumil Ženišek (Czechoslovakia)

Czechoslovakia vs RomaniaEdit

Romania were the underdogs, yet they went ahead after just 11 minutes with a close range goal from Ștefan Dobay. After Silviu Bindea missed an opportunity to double Romania's advantage, Czechoslovakia scored twice and held on for the victory.[2]

Czechoslovakia  2–1  Romania
Puč   50'
Nejedlý   67'
Report Dobay   11'
Attendance: 9,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Czechoslovakia
 
 
 
 
 
 
Romania
GK František Plánička (c)
RB Ladislav Ženíšek
LB Josef Čtyřoký
RH Josef Košťálek
CH Štefan Čambal
LH Rudolf Krčil
OR František Junek
IR Josef Silný
IL Oldřich Nejedlý
OL Antonín Puč
CF Jiří Sobotka
Manager:
Karel Petrů
 
GK Vilmos Zombori
RB Emerich Vogl (c)
LB Gheorghe Albu
RH Vasile Deheleanu
CH Rudolf Kotormány
LH József Moravetz
OR Silviu Bindea
IR Nicolae Kovács
IL Iuliu Bodola
OL Ștefan Dobay
CF Grațian Sepi
Manager:
Josef Uridil and Costel Rădulescu

Assistant referees:
Giuseppe Scarpi (Italy)
Raffaele Scorzoni (Italy)

Sweden vs ArgentinaEdit

Argentina proved a shadow of the team that was finalist in the 1930 World Cup. In fact, they presented a roster of newcomers as only Alfredo Devincenzi and Arcadio López were previously capped by the team. Argentina took the lead with a 25-yard free kick by Ernesto Belis. A more organised Sweden team soon equalized with Sven Jonasson. Argentina showed an excellent attacking prowess and went ahead again with an individual effort from Alberto Galateo. However, an efficient Sweden team took advantage of the defensive weakness of Argentina to score twice before the final whistle and hold on for the victory.[2]

Sweden  3–2  Argentina
Jonasson   9'67'
Kroon   79'
Report Belis   4'
Galateo   48'
Attendance: 14,000
Referee: Eugen Braun (Austria)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sweden
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Argentina
GK Anders Rydberg
RB Nils Axelsson
LB Sven Andersson
RH Rune Carlsson
CH Nils Rosén (c)
LH Ernst Andersson
OR Gösta Dunker
IR Ragnar Gustavsson
IL Tore Keller
OL Knut Kroon
CF Sven Jonasson
Manager:
József Nagy
 
GK Héctor Freschi
RB Juan Pedevilla
LB Ernesto Belis
RH José Nehin
CH Constantino Urbieta Sosa
LH Arcadio López
OR Francisco Rúa
IR Federico Wilde
IL Alberto Galateo
OL Roberto Irañeta
CF Alfredo Devincenzi (c)
Manager:
Felipe Pascucci

Assistant referees:
Albino Carraro (Italy)
Giuseppe Turbiani (Italy)

Austria vs FranceEdit

France took the lead with a goal from Jean Nicolas, who had suffered a head injury in the early stages of the match. Austria drew level on the brink of half time thanks to a goal from the star Matthias Sindelar. An uneventful second half followed, so the match became the first in the history of World Cup to go to extra time. In the extra time, Austria prevailed and scored twice before France got a late second goal from the spot.[2]

Austria  3–2 (a.e.t.)  France
Sindelar   44'
Schall   93'
Bican   109'
Report Nicolas   18'
Verriest   116' (pen.)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Austria
 
 
 
 
 
France
GK Peter Platzer
RB Franz Cisar
LB Karl Sesta
RH Franz Wagner
CH Josef Smistik (c)
LH Johann Urbanek
OR Karl Zischek
IR Josef Bican
IL Anton Schall
OL Rudolf Viertl
CF Matthias Sindelar
Manager:
Hugo Meisl
 
GK Alex Thépot
RB Jacques Mairesse
LB Étienne Mattler
RH Edmond Delfour
CH Georges Verriest (c)
LH Noël Liétaer
OR Fritz Keller
IR Joseph Alcazar
IL Roger Rio
OL Alfred Aston
CF Jean Nicolas
Manager:
Sid Kimpton

Assistant referees:
Camillo Caironi (Italy)
Louis Baert (Belgium)

Germany vs BelgiumEdit

A clinical Germany took their chance to achieve a scoreline that did not reflect the balance of the game. Belgium closed the first half in the lead, however, Germany came out stronger from the dressing room and overturned the results. Edmund Conen scored a hat-trick.[2]

Germany  5–2  Belgium
Kobierski   25'
Siffling   49'
Conen   66'70'87'
Report Voorhoof   29'43'
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Germany
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Belgium
GK Willibald Kreß
RB Sigmund Haringer
LB Hans Schwartz
RH Paul Janes
CH Fritz Szepan (c)
LH Paul Zielinski
OR Ernst Lehner
IR Karl Hohmann
IL Otto Siffling
OL Stanislaus Kobierski
CF Edmund Conen
Manager:
Otto Nerz
 
GK André Vandewyer
RB Philibert Smellinckx
LB Constant Joacim
RH Frans Peeraer
CH Félix Welkenhuysen (c)
LH Jean Claessens
OR François Devries
IR Bernard Voorhoof
IL Laurent Grimmonprez
OL Albert Heremans
CF Jean Capelle
Manager:
Sid Kimpton

Assistant referees:
Ermenegildo Melandri (Italy)
Jacques Baert (France)

Quarter-finalsEdit

Austria vs HungaryEdit

An extremely tough game prevented the two teams from truly showing the technical skills they possessed. Austria took an early lead with Johann Horvath, who finished a well-organised team move. Austria doubled their lead in the early stages of the second half. Shortly after, Hungary got one back thanks to a penalty caused by Karl Sesta. The match hung in the balance until Hungary lost two players: Imre Markos was red carded and István Avar got injured. After that, Austria comfortably cruised to the victory.[2]

Austria  2–1  Hungary
Horvath   8'
Zischek   51'
Report Sárosi   60' (pen.)
Attendance: 23,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Austria
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hungary
GK Peter Platzer
RB Franz Cisar
LB Karl Sesta
RH Franz Wagner
CH Josef Smistik (c)
LH Johann Urbanek
OR Karl Zischek
IR Josef Bican
IL Johann Horvath
OL Rudolf Viertl
CF Matthias Sindelar
Manager:
Hugo Meisl
 
GK Antal Szabó
RB József Vágó
LB László Sternberg (c)
RH István Palotás
CH György Szűcs
LH Antal Szalay
OR Imre Markos
IR István Avar
IL Géza Toldi
OL Tibor Kemény
CF György Sárosi
Manager:
Ödön Nádas

Assistant referees:
Pedro Escartín (Spain)
Alfred Birlem (Germany)

Italy vs SpainEdit

The first game between Italy and Spain was one of the most contentious and marred by several poor refereeing decisions, especially seeing Italy players challenging roughly the goalkeeper Ricardo Zamora. Spain went ahead with Luis Regueiro, but their lead did not last long. Italy equalized when Giovanni Ferrari knocked in a rebound, while Zamora was blocked off by Schiavio. The tie required a replay to settle.[2]

Italy  1–1 (a.e.t.)  Spain
Ferrari   44' Report Regueiro   30'
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: Louis Baert (Belgium)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Italy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Spain
GK Gianpiero Combi (c)
RB Eraldo Monzeglio
LB Luigi Allemandi
RH Mario Pizziolo
CH Luis Monti
LH Armando Castellazzi
OR Enrique Guaita
IR Giuseppe Meazza
IL Giovanni Ferrari
OL Raimundo Orsi
CF Angelo Schiavio
Manager:
Vittorio Pozzo
 
GK Ricardo Zamora (c)
RB Ciriaco
LB Jacinto Quincoces
RH Leonardo Cilaurren
CH José Muguerza
LH Fede
OR Lafuente
IR José Iraragorri
IL Luis Regueiro
OL Guillermo Gorostiza
CF Isidro Lángara
Manager:
Amadeo García

Assistant referees:
Bohumil Ženišek (Czechoslovakia)
Mihály Ivanicsics (Hungary)

Germany vs SwedenEdit

Pouring rain influenced the match, which saw very few notable moments in the first half. In the second half, Ernst Andersson suffered a head injury, and Germany took the lead with Karl Hohmann while the Swedish player was off. Hohmann scored again three minutes later. Sweden managed to get a goal back, but their subsequent efforts were not enough and Germany progressed to the first of many semi-finals.[2]

Germany  2–1  Sweden
Hohmann   60'63' Report Dunker   82'
Attendance: 3,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Germany
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sweden
GK Willibald Kreß
RB Sigmund Haringer
LB Willy Busch
RH Rudolf Gramlich
CH Fritz Szepan (c)
LH Paul Zielinski
OR Ernst Lehner
IR Karl Hohmann
IL Otto Siffling
OL Stanislaus Kobierski
CF Edmund Conen
Manager:
Otto Nerz
 
GK Anders Rydberg
RB Nils Axelsson
LB Sven Andersson
RH Rune Carlsson
CH Nils Rosén (c)
LH Ernst Andersson
OR Gösta Dunker
IR Ragnar Gustavsson
IL Tore Keller
OL Knut Kroon
CF Sven Jonasson
Manager:
József Nagy

Assistant referees:
René Mercet (Switzerland)
Johannes van Moorsel (Netherlands)

Czechoslovakia vs SwitzerlandEdit

In a well-balanced game, Switzerland took the lead with Kielholz thanks to a counter-attacking play. Czechoslovakia equalized soon after with František Svoboda, who turned a chance created by Jiří Sobotka into a goal. In the second half, although Switzerland dominated the ball possession, it was Czechoslovakia scoring twice and holding on for the victory.[2]

Czechoslovakia  3–2   Switzerland
Svoboda   24'
Sobotka   49'
Nejedlý   82'
Report Kielholz   18'
Jäggi   78'
Attendance: 12,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Czechoslovakia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Switzerland
GK František Plánička (c)
RB Ladislav Ženíšek
LB Josef Čtyřoký
RH Josef Košťálek
CH Štefan Čambal
LH Rudolf Krčil
OR František Junek
IR František Svoboda
IL Oldřich Nejedlý
OL Antonín Puč
CF Jiří Sobotka
Manager:
Karel Petrů
 
GK Frank Séchehaye
RB Severino Minelli (c)
LB Walter Weiler
RH Albert Guinchard
CH Fernand Jaccard
LH Ernst Hufschmid
OR Willy von Känel
IR Willy Jäggi
IL André Abegglen
OL Alfred Jäck
CF Leopold Kielholz
Manager:
Heinrich Müller

Assistant referees:
Youssuf Mohamed (Egypt)
Jacques Baert (France)

Replay: Italy vs SpainEdit

The replay was played the day after the first game. The exhaustion and the injuries resulting from the first tie forced Italy and Spain to make four and seven changes respectively. Most notably, the experienced Zamora had to give way to the uncapped goalkeeper Juan José Nogués. Once again, the game was marred by controversial refereeing decisions. In the first five minutes, Crisant Bosch was hacked down by Eraldo Monzeglio in the penalty box. The penalty was not given, but the tackle resulted in the injury of Bosch. With no substitutes available, Spain had to play the remainder of the game with 10 men. Giuseppe Meazza scored soon after from a corner kick situation. In the second half, two Spanish goals were disallowed: one for offside and the other for a foul on a Spanish player. The referee, René Mercet, was suspended in the aftermath of the tournament.[2]

Italy  1–0  Spain
Meazza   11' Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Italy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Spain
GK Gianpiero Combi (c)
RB Eraldo Monzeglio
LB Luigi Allemandi
RH Giovanni Ferrari
CH Luis Monti
LH Luigi Bertolini
OR Enrique Guaita
IR Giuseppe Meazza
IL Attilio Demaría
OL Raimundo Orsi
CF Felice Borel
Manager:
Vittorio Pozzo
 
GK Juan José Nogués
RB Ramón Zabalo
LB Jacinto Quincoces (c)
RH Leonardo Cilaurren
CH José Muguerza
LH Simón Lecue
OR Martí Ventolrà
IR Luis Regueiro
IL Chacho
OL Crisant Bosch
CF Campanal I
Manager:
Amadeo García

Assistant referees:
Bohumil Ženišek (Czechoslovakia)
Mihály Ivanicsics (Hungary)

Semi-finalsEdit

Italy vs AustriaEdit

A torrential downpour hampered the Austrians' passing game while benefiting the more varied Italian game. Italy took the lead when a ball broke free from the Austrian goalkeeper because of an intervention by Giuseppe Meazza. The ball then hit the post and was turned into goal by a perfectly positioned Enrique Guaita. In the second half, Austrian efforts to equalize were stopped by Gianpiero Combi, and Italy managed to hold on for the victory.[2]

Italy  1–0  Austria
Guaita   19' Report
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: Ivan Eklind (Sweden)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Italy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Austria
GK Gianpiero Combi (c)
RB Eraldo Monzeglio
LB Luigi Allemandi
RH Attilio Ferraris
CH Luis Monti
LH Luigi Bertolini
OR Enrique Guaita
IR Giuseppe Meazza
IL Giovanni Ferrari
OL Raimundo Orsi
CF Angelo Schiavio
Manager:
Vittorio Pozzo
 
GK Peter Platzer
RB Franz Cisar
LB Karl Sesta
RH Franz Wagner
CH Josef Smistik (c)
LH Johann Urbanek
OR Karl Zischek
IR Josef Bican
IL Anton Schall
OL Rudolf Viertl
CF Matthias Sindelar
Manager:
Hugo Meisl

Assistant referees:
Louis Baert (Belgium)
Bohumil Ženišek (Czechoslovakia)

Czechoslovakia vs GermanyEdit

The game proved to be a clash of styles, with a more technical Czechoslovakia facing a physical German side. Czechoslovakia took the lead in the first half, but Germany drew level in the second half when František Plánička could not keep out a tame shot by Rudolf Noack. The Germany goal stimulated the Czechoslovakian side. Czechoslovakia took advantage of their finesse and attacking prowess to score twice with Oldřich Nejedlý, who completed a hat-trick.[2]

Czechoslovakia  3–1  Germany
Nejedlý   21'69'80' Report Noack   62'
Attendance: 15,000
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Czechoslovakia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Germany
GK František Plánička (c)
RB Jaroslav Burgr
LB Josef Čtyřoký
RH Josef Košťálek
CH Štefan Čambal
LH Rudolf Krčil
OR František Junek
IR František Svoboda
IL Oldřich Nejedlý
OL Antonín Puč
CF Jiří Sobotka
Manager:
Karel Petrů
 
GK Willibald Kreß
RB Willy Busch
LB Sigmund Haringer
RH Paul Zielinski
CH Fritz Szepan (c)
LH Jakob Bender
OR Ernst Lehner
IR Otto Siffling
IL Rudolf Noack
OL Stanislaus Kobierski
CF Edmund Conen
Manager:
Otto Nerz

Assistant referees:
Alois Beranek (Austria)
Pedro Escartín (Spain)

Third place play-offEdit

Both teams changed their usual line-ups, resting several players. Austrian players wore an unusual light blue jersey borrowed from Napoli because of the clash of colours between the two traditional jerseys. Germany took the lead inside 25 seconds with the fastest goal of the tournament, scored by Ernst Lehner. They doubled the lead with Edmund Conen, but Austria got one back immediately after with Johann Horvath. Germany's third goal came after Karl Sesta attempted to sit on the ball to ridicule a German player; the ball was stolen by Conen, who crossed to Lehner. Sesta then scored a goal, but Germany held on for the victory.[2]

Germany  3–2  Austria
Lehner   1'42'
Conen   27'
Report Horvath   28'
Sesta   54'
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Germany
 
 
 
 
 
Austria
GK Hans Jakob
RB Paul Janes
LB Willy Busch
RH Paul Zielinski
CH Reinhold Münzenberg
LH Jakob Bender
OR Ernst Lehner
IR Otto Siffling
IL Fritz Szepan (c)
OL Matthias Heidemann
CF Edmund Conen
Manager:
Otto Nerz
 
GK Peter Platzer
RB Franz Cisar
LB Karl Sesta
RH Franz Wagner
CH Josef Smistik (c)
LH Johann Urbanek
OR Karl Zischek
IR Georg Braun
IL Johann Horvath
OL Rudolf Viertl
CF Josef Bican
Manager:
Hugo Meisl

Assistant referees:
Camillo Caironi (Italy)
Pedro Escartín (Spain)

FinalEdit

Italy  2–1 (a.e.t.)  Czechoslovakia
Orsi   81'
Schiavio   95'
Report Puč   71'
Attendance: 55,000
Referee: Ivan Eklind (Sweden)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Italy
 
 
 
 
 
 
Czechoslovakia
GK Gianpiero Combi (c)
RB Eraldo Monzeglio
LB Luigi Allemandi
RH Attilio Ferraris
CH Luis Monti
LH Luigi Bertolini
OR Enrique Guaita
IR Giuseppe Meazza
IL Giovanni Ferrari
OL Raimundo Orsi
CF Angelo Schiavio
Manager:
Vittorio Pozzo
 
GK František Plánička (c)
RB Josef Čtyřoký
LB Ladislav Ženíšek
RH Rudolf Krčil
CH Štefan Čambal
LH Josef Košťálek
OR Antonín Puč
IR Oldřich Nejedlý
IL František Svoboda
OL František Junek
CF Jiří Sobotka
Manager:
Karel Petrů

Assistant referees:
Louis Baert (Belgium)
Mihály Ivanicsics (Hungary)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Molinaro, John F. (24 November 2009). "1934 World Cup: Italy wins for Il Duce". CBC Sports. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 21 May 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Fielder, Robert (2018). The Complete History of the World Cup. Kindle Edition.

External linksEdit