1938 FIFA World Cup final tournament

The final tournament of the 1938 FIFA World Cup was a single-elimination tournament involving the 16 teams which qualified for the tournament. The tournament began with the round of 16 on 4 June and concluded with the final on 19 June 1938. Italy won the final 4–2 for their second World Cup title.[1]

All times are in Western European Summer Time (UTC+01).

BracketEdit

 
Round of 16Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
              
 
5 June – Marseille
 
 
  Italy (aet)2
 
12 June – Colombes
 
  Norway1
 
  Italy3
 
5 June – Colombes
 
  France1
 
  France3
 
16 June – Marseille
 
  Belgium1
 
  Italy2
 
5 June – Strasbourg
 
  Brazil1
 
  Brazil (aet)6
 
12 and 14 June – Bordeaux
 
  Poland5
 
  Brazil1 (2)
 
5 June – Le Havre
 
  Czechoslovakia1 (1)
 
  Czechoslovakia (aet)3
 
19 June – Colombes
 
  Netherlands0
 
  Italy4
 
5 June – Reims
 
  Hungary2
 
  Hungary6
 
12 June – Lille
 
  Dutch East Indies0
 
  Hungary2
 
4 and 9 June – Paris
 
  Switzerland0
 
  Switzerland1 (4)
 
16 June – Paris
 
  Germany1 (2)
 
  Hungary5
 
5 June – Lyon
 
  Sweden1 Third place
 
  Swedenw/o[a]
 
12 June – Antibes19 June – Bordeaux
 
  Austria
 
  Sweden8  Brazil4
 
5 and 9 June – Toulouse
 
  Cuba0   Sweden2
 
  Cuba3 (2)
 
 
  Romania3 (1)
 

Round of 16Edit

Switzerland vs GermanyEdit

Switzerland adopted a precursor version of the Catenaccio system to try stopping the talented German forwards. Thanks to this tactical system, the Swiss managed to frustrate the Germans despite going behind after a goal from Gauchel. Switzerland drew level with Abegglen after a mistake from Willibald Schmaus. Although the Germans pushed for the win, the game ended with a draw, forcing a replay.[2]

Switzerland  1–1 (a.e.t.)  Germany
Abegglen   43' Report Gauchel   29'
Attendance: 27,152
GK Willy Huber
RB Severino Minelli (c)
LB August Lehmann
RH Hermann Springer
CH Sirio Vernati
LH Ernst Lörtscher
OR Lauro Amadò
IR André Abegglen
IL Eugen Walaschek
OL Paul Aeby
CF Alfred Bickel
Manager:
Karl Rappan
 
GK Rudolf Raftl
RB Paul Janes
LB Willibald Schmaus
RH Andreas Kupfer
CH Hans Mock (c)
LH Albin Kitzinger
OR Ernst Lehner
IR Rudolf Gellesch
IL Wilhelm Hahnemann
OL Hans Pesser   96'
CF Josef Gauchel
Manager:
Sepp Herberger

Assistant referees:
Johannes van Moorsel (Netherlands)
Paul Marenco (France)

Hungary vs Dutch East IndiesEdit

The difference in strength between the two teams was evident as the game resulted in a humiliation for the Dutch East Indies, which managed to hold out for just 13 minutes. In the second half, although Hungary relaxed their pressure, they were never truly troubled by the opponents.[2]

Hungary  6–0  Dutch East Indies
Kohut   13'
Toldi   15'
Sárosi   28', 89'
Zsengellér   35', 76'
Report
Attendance: 9,000
Referee: Roger Conrié (France)
GK József Háda
RB Lajos Korányi
LB Sándor Bíró
RH Gyula Lázár
CH József Turay
LH István Balogh
OR Ferenc Sas
IR Gyula Zsengellér
IL Géza Toldi
OL Vilmos Kohut
CF György Sárosi (c)
Manager:
Károly Dietz
Alfréd Schaffer
 
GK Mo Heng Tan
RB Frans G. Hu Kon
LB Jack Samuels
RH Achmad Nawir (c)
CH Frans Alfred Meeng
LH Sutan Anwar
OR The Hong Djien
IR Suvarte Soedarmadji
IL Isaak "Tjaak" Pattiwael
OL M.J. Hans Taihuttu
CF Herman Zomers
Manager:
Johannes Christoffel Jan Mastenbroek

Assistant referees:
Charles de la Salle (France)
Karl Weingärtner (Germany)

Sweden vs AustriaEdit

Cuba vs RomaniaEdit

Cuba, who had only qualified because other Latin American selections had withdrawn, impressed against Romania. Romania scored first thanks to a goal that different sources attribute to either Bindea or Kovács. Cuba drew level with Socorro, who converted a cross from José Magriñá and then took the lead with a goal from Magriñá himself. After an equaliser from Iuliu Baratky, one goal was scored by each side in extra time, forcing a replay.[2]

Cuba  3–3 (a.e.t.)  Romania
Socorro   44', 103'
Magriñá   69'
Report Bindea   35'
Barátky   88'
Dobay   105'
Attendance: 7,000
Referee: Giuseppe Scarpi (Italy)
GK Benito Carvajales
RB Jacinto Barquín
LB Manuel Chorens (c)
RH Joaquín Arias
CH José Antonio Rodríguez
LH Pedro Bergés
OR José Magriñá
IR Tomás Fernández
IL Juan Tuñas
OL Mario Sosa
CF Héctor Socorro
Manager:
José Tapia
 
GK Dumitru Pavlovici
RB Rudolf Bürger
LB Vasile Chiroiu
RH Vintilă Cossini
CH Gheorghe Rășinaru (c)
LH László Raffinsky
OR Silviu Bindea
IR Nicolae Kovács
IL Iuliu Bodola
OL Ștefan Dobay
CF Iuliu Baratky
Manager:
Alexandru Săvulescu
Costel Rădulescu

Assistant referees:
Ferdinand Valprede (France)
Jean Merckx (France)

France vs BelgiumEdit

The hosts took the lead with only 35 seconds on the clock thanks to a shot from close range by winger Veinante. France doubled their advantage soon after, but the lead was halved before the interval thanks to Isemborghs, who connects with a free kick from Bernard Voorhoof. In the second half, Nicolas got his brace, sealing the victory for France.[2]

France  3–1  Belgium
Veinante   1'
Nicolas   16', 69'
Report Isemborghs   38'


GK Laurent Di Lorto
RB Hector Cazenave
LB Étienne Mattler (c)
RH Jean Bastien
CH Auguste Jordan
LH Raoul Diagne
OR Alfred Aston
IR Oscar Heisserer
IL Edmond Delfour
OL Émile Veinante
CF Jean Nicolas
Manager:
Gaston Barreau
 
GK Arnold Badjou
RB Robert Paverick
LB Corneel Seys
RH John Van Alphen
CH Émile Stijnen (c)
LH Alfons De Winter
OR Charles Vanden Wouwer
IR Bernard Voorhoof
IL Raymond Braine
OL Fernand Buyle
CF Hendrik Isemborghs
Manager:
Jack Butler

Assistant referees:
Augustin Krist (Czechoslovakia)
Alfred Birlem (Germany)

Italy vs NorwayEdit

Mindful of the game played against Norway at the semi-finals of the 1936 Summer Olympics, when Italy managed to scrap a win only during extra time, Vittorio Pozzo was not to be overconfident. Italy managed to grab an early lead with Pietro Ferraris, but struggle to threaten Norway's goal further besides hitting the post once. In the second half, Norway was the better team, hitting the woodwork thrice and finally drawing level in the 83rd minute. Soon inside the extra time, Silvio Piola converted in goal a rebounded shot. Italy managed to hold out for the remaining time, reaching the quarter-finals.[2]

Italy  2–1 (a.e.t.)  Norway
Ferraris   2'
Piola   94'
Report Brustad   83'
Attendance: 19,000
GK Aldo Olivieri
RB Eraldo Monzeglio
LB Pietro Rava
RH Pietro Serantoni
CH Michele Andreolo
LH Ugo Locatelli
OR Piero Pasinati
IR Giuseppe Meazza (c)
CF Silvio Piola
IL Giovanni Ferrari
OL Pietro Ferraris
Manager:
Vittorio Pozzo
 
GK Henry Johansen
RB Rolf Johannessen
LB Øivind Holmsen
RH Kristian Henriksen
CH Nils Eriksen (c)
LH Rolf Holmberg
OR Odd Frantzen
IR Reidar Kvammen
CF Knut Brynildsen
IL Magnar Isaksen
OL Arne Brustad
Manager:
Asbjørn Halvorsen

Assistant referees:
Georges Boutoure (France)
Paul Tréhou (France)

Brazil vs PolandEdit

Brazil  6–5 (a.e.t.)  Poland
Leônidas   18', 93', 104'
Romeu   25'
Perácio   44', 71'
Report Scherfke   23' (pen.)
Wilimowski   53', 59', 89', 118'
Attendance: 13,452
Referee: Ivan Eklind (Sweden)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brazil
 
 
 
 
 
 
Poland

Assistant referees:
Louis Poissant (France)
Ernest Kissenberger (France)


Czechoslovakia vs NetherlandsEdit

Finalist at the 1934 World Cup, Czechoslovakia faced a modest Dutch team. Czechoslovakia dominated the ball but did not manage to convert their possession into clear-cut chances against a defensively sound Dutch team. In fact, Czechoslovakia managed to take the lead only in extra-time through a long-range effort, scoring further two goals by the end of the game.[2]

Czechoslovakia  3–0 (a.e.t.)  Netherlands
Košťálek   93'
Zeman   111'
Nejedlý   118'
Report
Attendance: 11,000
Referee: Lucien Leclerq (France)
GK František Plánička (c)
RB Jaroslav Burgr
LB Ferdinand Daučík
RH Josef Košťálek
CH Jaroslav Bouček
LH Vlastimil Kopecký
OR Jan Říha
IR Ladislav Šimůnek
IL Oldřich Nejedlý
OL Antonín Puč
CF Josef Zeman
Manager:
Josef Meissner
 
GK Adri van Male
RB Mauk Weber
LB Bertus Caldenhove
RH Bas Paauwe
CH Wim Anderiesen
LH Puck van Heel (c)
OR Frank Wels
IR Frans van der Veen
IL Kick Smit
OL Bertus de Harder
CF Leen Vente
Manager:
Bob Glendenning

Assistant referees:
Eugené Olive (France)
Victor Sdez (France)

Replay: Switzerland vs GermanyEdit

The replay was played 5 days later. Switzerland used the same line-ups as the first game, while Germany made a few changes. Paul Aeby got injured after a few minutes, forcing Switzerland to play with 10 men. Germany took soon advantage, scoring twice. However, Switzerland reacted well, and with Aeby back on the pitch in the second half, completed a remarkable comeback.[2]

Switzerland  4–2  Germany
Walaschek   42'
Bickel   64'
Abegglen   75', 78'
Report Hahnemann   8'
Lörtscher   22' (o.g.)
Attendance: 20,025
Referee: Ivan Eklind (Sweden)
GK Willy Huber
RB Severino Minelli (c)
LB August Lehmann
RH Hermann Springer
CH Sirio Vernati
LH Ernst Lörtscher
OR Lauro Amadò
IR André Abegglen
IL Eugen Walaschek
OL Paul Aeby
CF Alfred Bickel
Manager:
Karl Rappan
 
GK Rudolf Raftl
RB Paul Janes
LB Jakob Streitle
RH Andreas Kupfer
CH Ludwig Goldbrunner
LH Stefan Skoumal
OR Ernst Lehner
IR Josef Stroh
IL Fritz Szepan (c)
OL Leopold Neumer
CF Wilhelm Hahnemann
Manager:
Sepp Herberger

Assistant referees:
Johannes van Moorsel (Netherlands)
Louis Baert (Belgium)

Replay: Cuba vs RomaniaEdit

Cuba replaced their goalkeeper but the performance from Juan Ayra was equally exceptional as the one from Benito Carvajales in the original match. Romania took the lead with Dobay in the first half. Cuba fought back and scored two goals in rapid succession in the early times of the second half. Cuba managed to hold out to reach the quarter-finals against all odds.[2]

Cuba  2–1  Romania
Socorro   51'
Fernández   57'
Report Dobay   35'
Attendance: 8,000
Referee: Alfred Birlem (Germany)
GK Juan Ayra
RB Jacinto Barquín
LB Manuel Chorens (c)
RH Joaquín Arias
CH José Antonio Rodríguez
LH Pedro Bergés
OR José Magriñá
IR Tomás Fernández
IL Juan Tuñas
OL Mario Sosa
CF Héctor Socorro
Manager:
José Tapia
 
GK Robert Sadowski
RB Rudolf Bürger
LB Iacob Felecan
RH Andrei Bărbulescu
CH Gheorghe Rășinaru (c)
LH László Raffinsky
OR Ion Bogdan
IR Ioachim Moldoveanu
IL Gyula Prassler
OL Ștefan Dobay
CF Iuliu Baratky
Manager:
Alexandru Săvulescu
Costel Rădulescu

Assistant referees:
Georges Capdeville (France)
Paul Marenco (France)

Quarter-finalsEdit

Hungary vs SwitzerlandEdit

Hungary looked like the stronger team as the Swiss were missing key players such as Georges Aeby and Severino Minelli. Hungary took the lead with a header from Sárosi. The result was in doubt for most of the second half, until Zsengellér sealed the game with a long-range effort in the dying minutes. Switerzland's manager Karl Rappan resigned after the game.[2]

Hungary  2–0  Switzerland
Sárosi   40'
Zsengellér   89'[c]
Report
GK Antal Szabó
RB Lajos Korányi
LB Sándor Bíró
RH Gyula Lázár
CH József Turay
LH Antal Szalay
OR Ferenc Sas
IR Gyula Zsengellér
IL Jenő Vincze
OL Vilmos Kohut
CF György Sárosi (c)
Manager:
Károly Dietz
Alfréd Schaffer
 
GK Willy Huber
RB Adolf Stelzer
LB August Lehmann (c)
RH Hermann Springer
CH Sirio Vernati
LH Ernst Lörtscher
OR Lauro Amadò
IR André Abegglen
IL Eugen Walaschek
OL Tullio Grassi
CF Alfred Bickel
Manager:
Karl Rappan

Assistant referees:
Alois Beranek (Germany)[b]
Georges Boutoure (France)

Sweden vs CubaEdit

The result was never in doubt as Sweden was more accustomed to playing at this level. Wetterström netted a hat-trick before half-time, with the Cubans unable to deal with the relentless Swedish forward play, especially after Arias was forced to leave the pitch injured. Tomás Fernández missed a penalty for Cuba.[2]

Sweden  8–0  Cuba
H. Andersson   9', 81', 89'[d]
Wetterström   22', 37', 44'
Keller   80'[e]
Nyberg   84'[f]
Report
GK Henock Abrahamsson
RB Ivar Eriksson
LB Olle Källgren
RH Erik Almgren
CH Sven Jacobsson
LH Kurt Svanström
OR Arne Nyberg
IR Sven Jonasson
IL Tore Keller (c)
OL Gustav Wetterström
CF Harry Andersson
Manager:
József Nagy
 
GK Benito Carvajales
RB Jacinto Barquín
LB Manuel Chorens (c)
RH Joaquín Arias
CH José Antonio Rodríguez
LH Pedro Bergés
OR Pedro Ferrer
IR Tomás Fernández
IL Juan Tuñas
OL Juan Alonzo
CF Héctor Socorro
Manager:
José Tapia

Assistant referees:
Karl Weingärtner (Germany)
Victor Sedez (France)

Italy vs FranceEdit

Titleholders Italy met hosts France in what was considered one of the most enticing games of the tournament. Italy wore their Fascist affiliated black shirts despite the anti-Fascism protests that the team had received in France. Italy had a better start, scoring within the first nine minutes, but France levelled immediately. In the second half, France tried to control the ball but, in doing so, they left themselves open for the lethal Italian counter-attack. Piola scored a brace while unmarked, leading Italy to the semifinals.[2]

Italy  3–1  France
Colaussi   9'
Piola   51', 72'
Report Heisserer   10'
GK Aldo Olivieri
RB Alfredo Foni
LB Pietro Rava
RH Pietro Serantoni
CH Michele Andreolo
LH Ugo Locatelli
OR Amedeo Biavati
IR Giuseppe Meazza (c)
IL Giovanni Ferrari
OL Gino Colaussi
CF Silvio Piola
Manager:
Vittorio Pozzo
 
GK Laurent Di Lorto
RB Hector Cazenave
LB Étienne Mattler (c)
RH Jean Bastien
CH Auguste Jordan
LH Raoul Diagne
OR Alfred Aston
IR Oscar Heisserer
IL Edmond Delfour
OL Émile Veinante
CF Jean Nicolas
Manager:
Gaston Barreau

Assistant referees:
Hans Wüthrich (Switzerland)
Ivan Eklind (Sweden)

Brazil vs CzechoslovakiaEdit

Brazil  1–1 (a.e.t.)  Czechoslovakia
Leônidas   30' Report Nejedlý   65' (pen.)
Attendance: 22,021

Assistant referees:
Giuseppe Scarpi (Italy)
Charles de la Salle (France)

Replay: Brazil vs CzechoslovakiaEdit

Because of the troubling effect of the first game, which saw several players getting injured or sent off, both teams had to make many changes to their line-ups (nine for Brazil and 5 for Czechoslovakia). Czechoslovakia took the lead with Kopecký in the 25th minute. In the second half, Brazil levelled with their captain, Leônidas, but soon after Czechoslovakia's players believed that a shot by Karel Senecký had crossed the lines, but the goal was not given. Following another attack from Czechoslovakia, Brazil scored a second goal from a fast counter-attack capitalised by the debutant Roberto. Brazil managed to hold out to reach the semi-finals.[2]

Brazil  2–1  Czechoslovakia
Leônidas   57'
Roberto   62'[g]
Report Kopecký   25'
Attendance: 18,141
GK Walter
RB Jaú
LB Nariz
RH Britto
CH Brandão
LH Argemiro
OR Roberto
IR Luisinho
IL Tim
OL Patesko
CF Leônidas (c)
Manager:
Ademir Pimenta
 
GK Karel Burkert
RB Jaroslav Burgr (c)
LB Ferdinand Daučík
RH Josef Košťálek
CH Jaroslav Bouček
LH Arnošt Kreuz
OR Václav Horák
IR Karel Senecký
IL Vlastimil Kopecký
OL Oldřich Rulc
CF Josef Ludl
Manager:
Josef Meissner

Assistant referees:
Ernest Kissenberger (France)
Paul Marenco (France)

Semi-finalsEdit

Hungary vs SwedenEdit

Sweden took the lead after just 35 seconds, but that remained the only goal scored by them. Hungary quickly settled in control of the game, scoring thrice before half-time. Sweden, who had impressed in previous games, could not resist the vastly superior opponent, who scored two additional goals in the second half, cruising towards the final after a comfortable win.[2]

Hungary  5–1  Sweden
Jacobsson   19' (o.g.)
Titkos   37'
Zsengellér   39', 85'
Sárosi   65'
Report Nyberg   1'
Attendance: 20,000
Referee: Lucien Leclerq (France)
GK Antal Szabó
RB Lajos Korányi
LB Sándor Bíró
RH Antal Szalay
CH József Turay
LH Gyula Lázár
OR Ferenc Sas
IR Gyula Zsengellér
IL Géza Toldi
OL Pál Titkos
CF György Sárosi (c)
Manager:
Károly Dietz
Alfréd Schaffer
 
GK Henock Abrahamsson
RB Ivar Eriksson
LB Olle Källgren
RH Erik Almgren
CH Sven Jacobsson
LH Kurt Svanström
OR Arne Nyberg
IR Sven Jonasson
IL Tore Keller (c)
OL Gustav Wetterström
CF Harry Andersson
Manager:
József Nagy

Assistant referees:
Giuseppe Scarpi (Italy)
Johannes van Moorsel (Netherlands)

Italy vs BrazilEdit

The narrative leading to this highly anticipated match was built around an overconfident Brazil, who had impressed in the previous three matches. However, Italy had a better start to the game, creating the best chances but finding a well-positioned Walter stopping their attacks. In the second half, Italy soon found the net with Colaussi, before being awarded a penalty following a foul in the box by Domingos da Guia, his third in the tournament. The penalty was calmly converted by Meazza. At 2–0, Brazil pushed forward to break the Italian defence, but only managed to score a goal in the 87th minute with Romeu scoring from a corner kick. Some tense moments followed, but Italy managed to hold out for the remaining time, reaching their second final in a row.[2]

Italy  2–1  Brazil
Colaussi   51'
Meazza   60' (pen.)
Report Romeu   87'
GK Aldo Olivieri
RB Alfredo Foni
LB Pietro Rava
RH Pietro Serantoni
CH Michele Andreolo
LH Ugo Locatelli
OR Amedeo Biavati
IR Giuseppe Meazza (c)
IL Giovanni Ferrari
OL Gino Colaussi
CF Silvio Piola
Manager:
Vittorio Pozzo
 
GK Walter
RB Domingos da Guia
LB Machado
RH Zezé Procópio
CH Martim (c)
LH Afonsinho
OR Lopes
IR Luisinho
IL Romeu
OL Patesko
CF Perácio
Manager:
Adhemar Pimenta

Assistant referees:
Alois Beranek (Germany)[b]
Paul Marenco (France)

Third place play-offEdit

Sweden started on the front foot, taking a double lead inside 38 minutes. In the first half, Brazil looked uninspired until they got one back before half-time. In the second half, Brazil was reinvigorated and pushed for the comeback. In the second half, Leônidas scored twice and even let Patesko kick a penalty that he missed. Perácio secured the victory in the 80th minute.[2]

Brazil  4–2  Sweden
Romeu   44'
Leônidas   63', 74'
Perácio   80'
Report Jonasson   28'
Nyberg   38'
Attendance: 12,000
GK Batatais
RB Domingos da Guia
LB Machado
RH Zezé Procópio
CH Brandão
LH Afonsinho
OR Roberto
IR Romeu
IL Perácio
OL Patesko
CF Leônidas (c)
Manager:
Adhemar Pimenta
 
GK Henock Abrahamsson
RB Ivar Eriksson
LB Erik Nilsson
RH Erik Almgren
CH Arne Linderholm
LH Kurt Svanström (c)
OR Nyberg
IR Sven Jonasson
IL Åke Andersson
OL Erik Persson
CF Harry Andersson
Manager:
József Nagy

Assistant referees:
Ferdinand Valprede (France)
Eugené Olive (France)

FinalEdit

Italy  4–2  Hungary
Colaussi   6', 35'
Piola   16', 82'
Report Titkos   8'
Sárosi   70'
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Italy
 
 
 
 
 
Hungary
GK Aldo Olivieri
RB Alfredo Foni
LB Pietro Rava
RH Pietro Serantoni
CH Michele Andreolo
LH Ugo Locatelli
OR Amedeo Biavati
IR Giuseppe Meazza (c)
CF Silvio Piola
IL Giovanni Ferrari
OL Gino Colaussi
Manager:
Vittorio Pozzo
 
GK Antal Szabó
RB Sándor Bíró
LB Gyula Polgár
RH Gyula Lázár
CH György Szűcs
LH Antal Szalay
OR Pál Titkos
IR Gyula Zsengellér
CF György Sárosi (c)
IL Jenő Vincze
OL Ferenc Sas
Manager:
Alfréd Schaffer

Assistant referees:
Hans Wuethrich (Switzerland)
Augustin Krist (Czechoslovakia)

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Sweden advanced by walkover as Austria were unable to compete because of the Austrian Anschluss in March 1938.
  2. ^ a b c Actually from Austria, but representing the German Football Association because of the Anschluss.
  3. ^ RSSSF credits this goal as coming in the 90th minute.[3]
  4. ^ RSSSF credits goal in the 81st minute as coming in the 61st minute.[3]
  5. ^ RSSSF credits goal in the 80th minute as coming in the 60th minute.[3]
  6. ^ RSSSF credits this goal as coming in the 89th minute.[3]
  7. ^ FIFA initially credited this goal to Leônidas, but changed it to Roberto in 2006.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Molinaro, John F. (24 November 2009). "1938 World Cup: Italy repeats as champions". CBC Sports. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Fielder, Robert (2018). The Complete History of the World Cup. Kindle Edition.
  3. ^ a b c d "World Cup 1938 finals". RSSSF. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  4. ^ "American Bert Patenaude credited with first hat trick in FIFA World Cup history". FIFA.com. 2006. Archived from the original on 16 November 2006.

External linksEdit