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The 2019 UEFA Nations League Finals was the final tournament of the 2018–19 edition of the UEFA Nations League, the inaugural season of the international football competition involving the men's national teams of the 55 member associations of UEFA.[2] The tournament was held in Portugal from 5 to 9 June 2019,[3] and was contested by the four group winners of Nations League A. The tournament consisted of two semi-finals, a third place play-off, and final to determine the inaugural champions of the UEFA Nations League.

2019 UEFA Nations League Finals
Fase Final da Liga das Nações da UEFA de 2019
2019 UEFA Nations League Finals.svg
Tournament details
Host countryPortugal
Dates5–9 June
Teams4
Venue(s)2 (in 2 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Portugal (1st title)
Runners-up Netherlands
Third place England
Fourth place  Switzerland
Tournament statistics
Matches played4
Goals scored9 (2.25 per match)
Attendance127,067 (31,767 per match)
Top scorer(s)Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo (3 goals)
Best player(s)Portugal Bernardo Silva[1]
Best young playerNetherlands Frenkie de Jong[1]
2021

Portugal won the final 1–0 against the Netherlands to become the first champions of the UEFA Nations League.

FormatEdit

The Nations League Finals take place in June 2019 and are contested by the four group winners of League A. The four teams were each drawn into a five-team group (rather than a six-team group) for the UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying group stage, thereby leaving the June 2019 window available for the Nations League Finals.[4]

The competition is played in a knockout format, consisting of two semi-finals, a third place play-off, and a final. The semi-final pairings, along with the administrative home teams for the third place play-off and final, are determined by means of an open draw. The draw took place on 3 December 2018, 14:30 CET (13:30 local time) at the Shelbourne Hotel in Dublin, Republic of Ireland.[5][6][7][8]

The tournament takes place over five days, with the first semi-final (which features the host team) on 5 June, the second semi-final on 6 June, and the third place play-off and final on 9 June.[9] The winners of the final will be crowned as the inaugural champions of the UEFA Nations League.[10]

The Nations League Finals are played in single-leg knockout matches. If the scores are level at the end of normal time, 30 minutes of extra time are played, where each team is allowed to make a fourth substitution.[11] If the score is still level, the winner is determined by a penalty shoot-out. All matches in the tournament will utilise the goal-line technology system.[12] On 3 December, UEFA confirmed that the video assistant referee (VAR) system will be used for the Nations League Finals.[13]

Qualified teamsEdit

The four group winners of League A qualified for the Nations League Finals.[14]

Group Winners Date of
qualification
UNL Rankings
November 2018
FIFA Rankings
April 2019
A1   Netherlands 19 November 2018 3 16
A2    Switzerland 18 November 2018 1 8
A3   Portugal (hosts) 17 November 2018 2 7
A4   England 18 November 2018 4 4

Host selectionEdit

Portugal was confirmed as the host country by the UEFA Executive Committee during their meeting on 3 December 2018 in Dublin, Republic of Ireland.[15][16] Only League A teams could bid for the Nations League Finals, and only one of the four participants could be selected as hosts. The Nations League Finals will be held in two stadiums, each with a seating capacity of at least 30,000. Ideally, the stadiums should be located in the same host city or up to approximately 150 kilometres (93 mi) apart.[17][18]

On 9 March 2018, UEFA announced that Italy, Poland and Portugal expressed interest in bidding prior to the deadline. The deadline to submit their dossiers was 31 August 2018. As all three associations formed Group A3, the group winner was in line to be appointed as the host, provided that the associations submit bids which meet UEFA's requirements.[19] Poland were relegated from Group A3 on 14 October 2018, leaving Italy and Portugal as potential hosts.[20] On 17 November 2018, Portugal won Group A3 and advanced to the Finals,[21] thereby automatically winning hosting rights, which were confirmed by the UEFA Executive Committee on 3 December 2018, the same day as the Finals draw.[3]

VenuesEdit

SquadsEdit

Each national team has to submit a squad of 23 players, three of whom must be goalkeepers, at least ten days before the opening match of the tournament. If a player becomes injured or ill severely enough to prevent his participation in the tournament before his team's first match, he will be replaced by another player.[12]

BracketEdit

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
5 June – Porto
 
 
  Portugal3
 
9 June – Porto
 
   Switzerland1
 
  Portugal1
 
6 June – Guimarães
 
  Netherlands0
 
  Netherlands (a.e.t.)3
 
 
  England1
 
Third place play-off
 
 
9 June – Guimarães
 
 
   Switzerland0 (5)
 
 
  England (p)0 (6)

All times are local, WEST (UTC+1).

Semi-finalsEdit

Portugal vs SwitzerlandEdit

Portugal  3–1   Switzerland
Report
Attendance: 42,415[22]
Referee: Felix Brych (Germany)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Portugal[23]
 
 
 
 
 
 
Switzerland[23]
GK 1 Rui Patrício
RB 20 Nélson Semedo
CB 3 Pepe   63'
CB 4 Rúben Dias
LB 5 Raphaël Guerreiro
RM 16 Bruno Fernandes   90+1'
CM 14 William Carvalho
CM 18 Rúben Neves
LM 10 Bernardo Silva
CF 23 João Félix   70'
CF 7 Cristiano Ronaldo (c)
Substitutions:
DF 6 José Fonte   63'
MF 17 Gonçalo Guedes   70'
MF 8 João Moutinho   90+1'
Manager:
Fernando Santos
 
GK 1 Yann Sommer
RB 2 Kevin Mbabu
CB 22 Fabian Schär   68'
CB 5 Manuel Akanji
LB 13 Ricardo Rodríguez
RM 17 Denis Zakaria   71'
CM 10 Granit Xhaka (c)   66'
CM 8 Remo Freuler   89'
LM 14 Steven Zuber   83'
AM 23 Xherdan Shaqiri   85'
CF 9 Haris Seferović
Substitutions:
MF 20 Edimilson Fernandes   71'
MF 11 Renato Steffen   83'
FW 19 Josip Drmić   89'
Manager:
Vladimir Petković

Man of the Match:
Cristiano Ronaldo (Portugal)[24]

Assistant referees:[23]
Mark Borsch (Germany)
Stefan Lupp (Germany)
Fourth official:
Viktor Kassai (Hungary)
Video assistant referee:
Christian Dingert (Germany)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Tobias Stieler (Germany)

Netherlands vs EnglandEdit

Netherlands  3–1 (a.e.t.)  England
Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Netherlands[26]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
England[26]
GK 1 Jasper Cillessen
RB 22 Denzel Dumfries   45'
CB 3 Matthijs de Ligt   30'
CB 4 Virgil van Dijk (c)
LB 17 Daley Blind
CM 15 Marten de Roon   68'
CM 21 Frenkie de Jong   114'
CM 8 Georginio Wijnaldum
RW 7 Steven Bergwijn   91'
CF 10 Memphis Depay
LW 9 Ryan Babel   68'
Substitutions:
FW 11 Quincy Promes   68'
MF 20 Donny van de Beek   106'   68'
MF 6 Davy Pröpper   91'
MF 16 Kevin Strootman   114'
Manager:
Ronald Koeman
 
GK 1 Jordan Pickford
RB 2 Kyle Walker
CB 5 John Stones
CB 6 Harry Maguire
LB 14 Ben Chilwell
CM 16 Declan Rice   106'
CM 17 Fabian Delph   77'
CM 18 Ross Barkley
RW 11 Jadon Sancho   61'
LW 10 Raheem Sterling (c)
CF 19 Marcus Rashford   46'
Substitutions:
FW 9 Harry Kane   70'   46'
MF 7 Jesse Lingard   61'
MF 8 Jordan Henderson   77'
MF 20 Dele Alli   106'
Manager:
Gareth Southgate

Man of the Match:
Frenkie de Jong (Netherlands)[27]

Assistant referees:[26]
Nicolas Danos (France)
Cyril Gringore (France)
Fourth official:
Anastasios Sidiropoulos (Greece)
Video assistant referee:
François Letexier (France)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Nicolas Rainville (France)

Third place play-offEdit

Switzerland   0–0 (a.e.t.)  England
Report
Penalties
5–6
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Switzerland[29]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
England[29]
GK 1 Yann Sommer
CB 22 Fabian Schär
CB 5 Manuel Akanji
CB 4 Nico Elvedi
RM 2 Kevin Mbabu
CM 10 Granit Xhaka (c)   116'
CM 8 Remo Freuler
LM 13 Ricardo Rodríguez   87'
RW 23 Xherdan Shaqiri   65'
LW 20 Edimilson Fernandes   61'
CF 9 Haris Seferović   113'
Substitutions:
MF 17 Denis Zakaria   61'
MF 14 Steven Zuber   65'
FW 19 Josip Drmić   87'
MF 7 Noah Okafor   113'
Manager:
Vladimir Petković
 
GK 1 Jordan Pickford
RB 22 Trent Alexander-Arnold
CB 12 Joe Gomez
CB 6 Harry Maguire
LB 3 Danny Rose   23'   70'
CM 4 Eric Dier
CM 17 Fabian Delph   106'
RW 7 Jesse Lingard   27'   106'
AM 20 Dele Alli
LW 10 Raheem Sterling
CF 9 Harry Kane (c)   75'
Substitutions:
DF 2 Kyle Walker   70'
FW 21 Callum Wilson   75'
FW 11 Jadon Sancho   106'
MF 18 Ross Barkley   106'
Manager:
Gareth Southgate

Man of the Match:
Jordan Pickford (England)[30]

Assistant referees:[29]
Octavian Șovre (Romania)
Sebastian Gheorghe (Romania)
Fourth official:
Anastasios Sidiropoulos (Greece)
Video assistant referee:
Michael Fabbri (Italy)
Assistant video assistant referees:
Marco Di Bello (Italy)

FinalEdit

Portugal  1–0  Netherlands
Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Portugal[32]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Netherlands[32]
GK 1 Rui Patrício
RB 20 Nélson Semedo
CB 4 Rúben Dias
CB 6 José Fonte
LB 5 Raphaël Guerreiro
CM 13 Danilo Pereira
CM 14 William Carvalho   90+3'
CM 16 Bruno Fernandes   81'
RF 7 Cristiano Ronaldo (c)
CF 17 Gonçalo Guedes   75'
LF 10 Bernardo Silva
Substitutions:
MF 15 Rafa Silva   75'
MF 8 João Moutinho   81'
MF 18 Rúben Neves   90+3'
Manager:
Fernando Santos
 
GK 1 Jasper Cillessen
RB 22 Denzel Dumfries   88'
CB 3 Matthijs de Ligt
CB 4 Virgil van Dijk (c)   90+1'
LB 17 Daley Blind
CM 15 Marten de Roon   81'
CM 21 Frenkie de Jong
CM 8 Georginio Wijnaldum
RW 7 Steven Bergwijn   60'
CF 10 Memphis Depay
LW 9 Ryan Babel   46'
Substitutions:
FW 11 Quincy Promes   46'
MF 20 Donny van de Beek   60'
FW 19 Luuk de Jong   81'
Manager:
Ronald Koeman

Man of the Match:
Rúben Dias (Portugal)[33]

Assistant referees:[34]
Roberto Alonso Fernández (Spain)
Juan Yuste Jiménez (Spain)
Fourth official:
Antonio Mateu Lahoz (Spain)
Reserve assistant referee:
Raúl Cabañero Martínez (Spain)
Video assistant referee:
Alejandro Hernández Hernández (Spain)
Assistant video assistant referee:
Juan Martínez Munuera (Spain)

StatisticsEdit

GoalscorersEdit

There were 9 goals scored in 4 matches, for an average of 2.25 goals per match.

3 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

AwardsEdit

Team of the Tournament

The Team of the Tournament was selected by UEFA's technical observers, and includes at least one player from each of the four participants.[35]

Goalkeeper Defenders Midfielders Forwards
  Jordan Pickford   Daley Blind
  Virgil van Dijk
  Rúben Dias
  Nélson Semedo
  Frenkie de Jong
  Georginio Wijnaldum
  Bruno Fernandes
  Cristiano Ronaldo
  Bernardo Silva
  Xherdan Shaqiri

UEFA also announced a team of the tournament based on the FedEx Performance Zone player rankings.[36]

FedEx Performance Zone Team of the Tournament
Goalkeeper Defenders Midfielders Forwards
  Jordan Pickford   Matthijs de Ligt
  Rúben Dias
  Raphaël Guerreiro
  Manuel Akanji
  Kevin Mbabu
  Frenkie de Jong
  Marten de Roon
  Bernardo Silva
  Memphis Depay
  Cristiano Ronaldo
Player of the Tournament

The Player of the Tournament award was given to Bernardo Silva, who was chosen by UEFA's technical observers.

Young Player of the Tournament

The SOCAR Young Player of the Tournament award was open to players born on or after 1 January 1996. The award was given to Frenkie de Jong, as chosen by UEFA's technical observers.

Top Scorer

The "Alipay Top Scorer Trophy", given to the top scorer in the Nations League Finals,[37] was awarded to Cristiano Ronaldo, who scored a hat-trick in the semi-final against Switzerland.[38] The ranking was determined using the following criteria: 1) goals in Nations League Finals, 2) assists in Nations League Finals, 3) fewest minutes played in Nations League Finals, 4) goals in league phase 5) fewest yellow and red cards in Nations League Finals, 6) fewest yellow and red cards in league phase.[39]

Top scorer rankings
Rank Player Goals Assists Minutes
    Cristiano Ronaldo 3 0 191
    Gonçalo Guedes 1 1 101
    Marcus Rashford 1 0 49
Goal of the Tournament

The SOCAR Goal of the Tournament was decided by online voting. A total four goals were in the shortlist, chosen by UEFA's technical observers, from two players: Cristiano Ronaldo (all three goals against Switzerland) and Matthijs de Ligt (against England).[40][41] Ronaldo won the award for his second goal against Switzerland.[42]

Rank Goalscorer Opponent Score Result Round
    Cristiano Ronaldo    Switzerland 2–1 3–1 Semi-finals
  3–1
  1–0
4   Matthijs de Ligt   England 1–1 3–1 (a.e.t.) Semi-finals

DisciplineEdit

A player is automatically suspended for the next match for receiving a red card, which may be extended for serious offences. Yellow card suspensions do not apply in the Nations League Finals.[12]

The following suspensions were served during the tournament:[43]

Player Offence(s) Suspension(s)
  Danilo Pereira   in league phase vs Poland (20 November 2018) Semi-finals vs Switzerland (5 June 2019)

Prize moneyEdit

The prize money to be distributed was announced in October 2018.[44] In addition to the €2.25 million solidarity fee for participating in the Nations League, the four participants will receive an additional €2.25 million for winning their groups and qualifying for the Nations League Finals.

In addition, the participants will receive payment based on performance:

  • Winners: €6 million
  • Runners-up: €4.5 million
  • Third place: €3.5 million
  • Fourth place: €2.5 million

This means that the maximum amount of solidarity and bonus fees for the UEFA Nations League winners is €10.5 million.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Bernardo Silva and Frenkie de Jong win Nations League awards". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 June 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  2. ^ "UEFA Nations League receives associations' green light". UEFA.com. 27 March 2014.
  3. ^ a b c "Portugal set to be Nations League Finals hosts". UEFA.com. 17 November 2018.
  4. ^ "UEFA Nations League format and schedule approved". UEFA.com. 4 December 2014.
  5. ^ "UEFA Nations League Finals: Draw Procedure" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 27 September 2018. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  6. ^ "UEFA Nations League Finals draw". UEFA.com.
  7. ^ "2019 UEFA Nations League Finals draw press kit" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 30 November 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  8. ^ "Nations League Finals draw: Portugal v Switzerland, Netherlands v England". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 3 December 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  9. ^ "UEFA Nations League 2018/19 League Phase draw". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 24 January 2018. Retrieved 24 January 2018.
  10. ^ "All you need to know: UEFA Nations League Finals". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 19 November 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  11. ^ "Amendments to football's Laws of the Game in various UEFA competitions". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 5 July 2018. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  12. ^ a b c "Regulations of the UEFA Nations League 2018/19" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 28 September 2017. Retrieved 3 October 2017.
  13. ^ "VAR to be used in UEFA Champions League knockout phase". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 3 December 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  14. ^ "England, Netherlands, Portugal and Switzerland in Nations League Finals". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 19 November 2018. Retrieved 19 November 2018.
  15. ^ "Portugal confirmed as Nations League Finals hosts". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 3 December 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  16. ^ "UEFA Executive Committee agenda for Dublin meeting". UEFA.com. 16 November 2018.
  17. ^ "Lyon to host 2018 UEFA Europa League final". UEFA. 9 December 2016.
  18. ^ "UEFA Nations League regulations approved". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 20 September 2017. Retrieved 29 January 2018.
  19. ^ "Italy, Poland, Portugal express interest in hosting Nations League Finals". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 March 2018. Retrieved 9 March 2018.
  20. ^ "Italy relegate Poland as Russia near promotion". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 14 October 2018. Retrieved 15 October 2018.
  21. ^ "Portugal hold Italy to reach Finals, Sweden win". UEFA.com. 17 November 2018.
  22. ^ "Full Time Report – Semi-finals – Portugal v Switzerland" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 5 June 2019. Retrieved 5 June 2019.
  23. ^ a b c "Tactical Line-ups – Semi-finals – Portugal v Switzerland" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 5 June 2019. Retrieved 5 June 2019.
  24. ^ Atkin, John (5 June 2019). "Portugal 3–1 Switzerland: Nations League at a glance". UEFA.com. Porto: Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 5 June 2019.
  25. ^ "Full Time Report – Semi-finals – Netherlands v England" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 June 2019. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  26. ^ a b c "Tactical Line-ups – Semi-finals – Netherlands v England" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 6 June 2019. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  27. ^ Atkin, John (6 June 2019). "Netherlands 3–1 England: Nations League at a glance". UEFA.com. Guimarães: Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  28. ^ "Full Time Report – Third-place match – Switzerland v England" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 June 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  29. ^ a b c "Tactical Line-ups – Third-place match – Switzerland v England" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 June 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  30. ^ "England beat Switzerland on penalties in Nations League match for third place". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 June 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  31. ^ "Full Time Report – Final – Portugal v Netherlands" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 June 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  32. ^ a b "Tactical Line-ups – Final – Portugal v Netherlands" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 June 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  33. ^ Atkin, John (9 June 2019). "Portugal 1–0 Netherlands: Nations League final at a glance". UEFA.com. Porto: Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  34. ^ "Porto swansong for proud Undiano". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 7 June 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  35. ^ "UEFA Nations League Finals: Team of the Tournament". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 10 June 2019. Retrieved 10 June 2019.
  36. ^ UEFA [@UEFAEURO] (9 June 2019). "FedEx Performance Zone Team of the Tournament" (Tweet). Archived from the original on 10 June 2019. Retrieved 10 June 2019 – via Twitter.
  37. ^ "Strikers compete for Alipay trophy at Nations League". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 30 May 2019. Retrieved 3 June 2019.
  38. ^ UEFA [@UEFAEURO] (10 June 2019). "Alipay Top Scorer rankings" (Tweet). Archived from the original on 10 June 2019. Retrieved 10 June 2019 – via Twitter.
  39. ^ "Alipay Top Scorer". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 June 2019. Retrieved 9 June 2019.
  40. ^ "SOCAR Goal of the Tournament". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 June 2019. Retrieved 10 June 2019.
  41. ^ UEFA [@UEFAEURO] (9 June 2019). "SOCAR Goal of the Tournament" (Tweet). Archived from the original on 10 June 2019. Retrieved 10 June 2019 – via Twitter.
  42. ^ "Goal of the Tournament: clean sweep for Ronaldo". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 10 June 2019. Retrieved 10 June 2019.
  43. ^ "UEFA Nations League 2019: Booking List before semi-finals" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 29 May 2019. Retrieved 2 June 2019.
  44. ^ "Increased UEFA Nations League solidarity and bonus fees". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 10 October 2018. Retrieved 19 November 2018.

External linksEdit