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San Marino national football team

The San Marino national football team (Italian: Nazionale di calcio di San Marino) is the national football team of San Marino, controlled by the San Marino Football Federation (FSGC). The team represents the second smallest population of any UEFA member.

San Marino
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)La Serenissima
AssociationFederazione Sammarinese Giuoco Calcio
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachFranco Varrella
CaptainAldo Simoncini
Most capsAndy Selva (74)
Top scorerAndy Selva (8)
Home stadiumSan Marino Stadium
FIFA codeSMR
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 211 Decrease 2 (29 November 2018)[1]
Highest118 (September 1993)
Lowest211 (November 2018 – present)
Elo ranking
Current 204 Increase 1 (13 December 2018)[2]
Highest165 (16 September 1987)
Lowest205 (8 September 2015)
First international
unofficial:

 San Marino 0–1 Canada Canada
(Serravalle, San Marino; 28 March 1986)
official:

 San Marino 0–4 Switzerland  
(Serravalle, San Marino; 14 November 1990)
Biggest win
 San Marino 1–0 Liechtenstein 
(Serravalle, San Marino; 28 April 2004)
Biggest defeat
 San Marino 0–13 Germany 
(Serravalle, San Marino; 6 September 2006)

The first official game played by a San Marino team was a 4–0 defeat in a European Championships qualifier by Switzerland in 1990. Previously, a San Marino side played an unofficial match against a Canadian Olympic team in 1986, losing 1–0 (goal: James Grimes). Since making their competitive bow, San Marino have competed in the qualifiers of every European Championship and World Cup, but have never won a match in either competition. They have only ever won one game, beating Liechtenstein 1–0 in a friendly match on 28 April 2004.

Until November 2014, San Marino were tied in last place in the FIFA World Rankings, a run that lasted since the rankings were given a new calculation methodology. They were tied for last with Bhutan, (208th) in the October 2014 rankings,[3] a 0–0 draw with Estonia during the Euro 2016 qualifying rounds ended their tenure at the foot of the rankings. The national side scored their first away goal in fourteen years against another Baltic side, Lithuania, during the same qualifying rounds.

San Marino's national team is often considered the worst national side in the history of the sport, having only ever won a single match of the 154 they've played, conceded 665 goals and scored only 23, conceding an average of 4.32 goals per game.[4]

Contents

HistoryEdit

Though the San Marino Football Federation formed in 1931, the federation did not establish a national team until 1986, when a team representing the Federation played Canada's Olympic team in an unofficial international. San Marino gained affiliation to governing bodies FIFA and UEFA in 1988,[5] allowing the team to participate in major championships. Prior to this, Sammarinese players had been considered Italian in international football contexts.[6]

San Marino's first match in a FIFA sanctioned competition was against Switzerland on 14 November 1990 in a qualifier for the 1992 European Championships. San Marino lost 4–0, and went to lose all eight qualifiers. The team particularly struggled in away matches, losing every one by at least four goals. San Marino scored only one goal, a penalty in a 3–1 defeat at home by Romania,[7] and conceded 33 goals in total.[8]

For their first World Cup qualifying campaign, San Marino were drawn in a group with England, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Turkey. The opening match resulted in a 10–0 hammering at the hands of Norway. The return match was less one-sided, finishing 2–0 to the Norwegians. A 4–1 defeat in Turkey saw San Marino score their first World Cup goal, and a 0–0 draw against the same opposition on 10 March 1993 gave them their first ever point. In their final qualifier, against England, Davide Gualtieri scored the then-fastest goal in World Cup Qualifying history—after 8.3 seconds—though the team went on to lose 7–1.[9] San Marino finished the campaign with one point, and conceded 46 goals in 10 matches.[10]

The team's qualification campaign for Euro 1996 followed a similar pattern to that of the previous European championships, as they lost every game. A match away to Finland gave San Marino their first goal away from home in the European championships, but the team lost 4–1.[11] Their only other goal came in a 3–1 home defeat by the Faroe Islands; the two wins over San Marino were the only points gained by the Faroe Islands in the group. In the return match, a 3–0 scoreline in Toftir, is the Faroe Islands record competitive win.[12]

Even by Sammarinese standards, qualification for the 1998 World Cup was disappointing. Losing every game by three goals or more, San Marino failed to score a single goal.[13] This is the only World Cup qualifying tournament in which they have failed to score. Qualification for Euro 2000 again resulted in defeats in every game. The closest game was against Cyprus, a 1–0 defeat on 18 November 1998.[14]

In April 2001, San Marino gained their first ever away point, drawing 1–1 with Latvia in Riga.[15] The team ended the 2002 World Cup qualifying group with a new best of three goals, though one of these came in a 10–1 defeat by Belgium. In Euro 2004 qualifying San Marino lost all eight matches, failing to score. The closest result was a 1–0 home defeat by Latvia, with the winner scored in the last minute.[16]

In April 2004, San Marino gained their first, and as of September 2016 only, win in their 65th attempt, a 1–0 victory over Liechtenstein in a friendly on 28 April 2004 courtesy of a fifth-minute goal by Andy Selva. The match was Martin Andermatt's debut as Liechtenstein manager.[17] Results during qualification for the 2006 World Cup followed a similar vein to previous qualifying groups. Matches were generally one-sided defeats, with the exception of single goal defeats at home by Lithuania and Belgium.[18]

San Marino's opening Euro 2008 qualifying match resulted in a record 13–0 defeat at home by Germany on 6 September 2006.[19] They scored only twice and conceded fifty-seven goals in losing all twelve matches, although the home matches against Ireland, Cyprus and Wales were each lost by a single goal.[20]

In the qualification campaign for the 2010 World Cup, they lost all ten matches played and failed to qualify. They conceded 47 goals in those fixtures, including 10 in a defeat by Poland, which became Poland's highest scoring victory of all time,[21] and scored just once, in a 3–1 defeat by Slovakia.[22] The Qualifiers for UEFA Euro 2012 started in a similar way, the first nine matches all being defeats with an aggregate of 49 goals conceded and none scored, their best result being a one-goal loss to Finland at home, with the worst being a heavy 11–0 loss to the Netherlands, which became the Netherlands' highest scoring victory of all time and San Marino's worst-ever away defeat.[23] This was then followed up by two lighter defeats, a 5–0 home loss against Sweden, before completing the campaign with a 4–0 away loss to Moldova.

On 10 September 2013, Alessandro Della Valle scored San Marino's first competitive goal in five years. With the score 0–1 to Poland in the Serravalle stadium, he headed in a free-kick in the 22nd minute, beating A.F.C. Bournemouth goalkeeper Artur Boruc at his front post. Poland then regained the lead a minute later, eventually winning 5–1. It was the first international goal of any kind scored by San Marino since the national team lost 3–2 at home to Malta, the second time (after a 2–2 friendly draw against Liechtenstein away in 2003) the national team has scored more than once in any given international at senior level.

On 15 November 2014, San Marino drew 0–0 at home against Estonia.[24] It was the first time in ten years that the team had not lost a game, ending a 61–match losing streak,[24] and securing the country's first ever point in a European Championship qualifier.[24]

On October 2016, Mattia Stefanelli scored against Norway in a 4-1 loss to San Marino. Stefanelli was also fouled earlier in the game.[25]

StadiumEdit

San Marino play home matches at the San Marino Stadium, a municipally owned stadium in Serravalle which also hosts the matches of club side San Marino Calcio.[26] It has a capacity of 7,000.[27] Crowds are low, and on occasion travelling supporters outnumber the Sammarinese support. For example, in the fixture against the Republic of Ireland in February 2007, 2,500 of the 3,294 crowd were Irish supporters.[28][29]

San Marino have played two "home" matches outside their borders. For World Cup qualifiers against England and the Netherlands in 1993 the Stadio Renato Dall'Ara in Bologna was used.

ReputationEdit

San Marino once had the smallest population of any UEFA country,[27] until the May 2013 election of Gibraltar.[30] The republic has never won a competitive fixture and its poor record has led the country to gain a very low reputation in world football. A 2004 1–0 friendly win against Liechtenstein remains their sole victory to date.

The national side is mainly composed of amateur players. Only a small number of players are professionals, with many holding second jobs outside of the sport. Their 13–0 defeat at home by Germany is a European Championship record,[19] and they have conceded ten goals on four other separate occasions.

In the FIFA World Rankings, San Marino traditionally have the lowest rank of any UEFA country. Since the creation of FIFA rankings in 1992, San Marino's average position has been 176th.[31]

In 2001, Latvia manager Gary Johnson resigned after failing to beat San Marino in a World Cup qualifier.[32] The Republic of Ireland's 2–1 win in February 2007 (due to a last-second goal) resulted in scathing press criticism.[33]

San Marino set a European record when they went over 20 games without scoring between October 2008 and August 2012.[34] On 8 September 2015, San Marino scored its first away goal in 14 years when Matteo Vitaioli scored against Lithuania in Euro 2016 qualification.[35][36]

Recent results and fixturesEdit

2017Edit

2018Edit

San Marino all-time record against all nationsEdit

Official matches

As of 18 November 2018

Unofficial matches

As of 15 October 2013
Opponent P W D L GF GA GD Win %
  Lebanon 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0%
  Syria 1 0 0 1 0 3 −3 0%
  Turkey 1 0 0 1 0 4 −4 0%
   Vatican City[37] 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0%
Total 4 0 2 2 0 7 −7 0%

List of matches not lost by San MarinoEdit

San Marino  0–0  Turkey
Report
Attendance: 957
Referee: Michel Piraux (Belgium)

Latvia  1–1  San Marino
Pahars   1' Report Albani   59'
Attendance: 4,000
Referee: Karen Nalbandyan (Armenia)

Liechtenstein  2–2  San Marino
Frick   16'
Burgmeier   23'
Report B. Gasperoni   39'
Ciacci   45'
Attendance: 850
Referee: Guido Wildhaber (Switzerland)

San Marino  1–0  Liechtenstein
Selva   5' Report
Attendance: 700
Referee: Ruaidhri Laird (Scotland)

San Marino  0–0  Estonia
Report
Attendance: 759
Referee: Felix Brych (Germany)

World Cup recordEdit

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
  1930 to   1990 Did not enter Did not enter
  1994 Did not qualify 10 0 1 9 2 46
  1998 8 0 0 8 0 42
    2002 8 0 1 7 3 30
  2006 10 0 0 10 2 40
  2010 10 0 0 10 1 47
  2014 10 0 0 10 1 54
  2018 10 0 0 10 2 51
  2022 To be determined To be determined
      2026
Total 0/21 66 0 2 64 11 310

European Championship recordEdit

Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA
  1960 Did not enter
  1964
  1968
  1972
  1976
  1980
  1984
  1988
  1992 Did not qualify
  1996
    2000
  2004
    2008
    2012
  2016
  2020 To be determined
  2024

Mediterranean Games recordEdit

Football at the Mediterranean Games
Year Round GP W D L GS GA
  1951 - 0 0 0 0 0 0
  1955 - 0 0 0 0 0 0
  1959 - 0 0 0 0 0 0
  1963 - 0 0 0 0 0 0
  1967 - 0 0 0 0 0 0
  1971 - 0 0 0 0 0 0
 1975 - 0 0 0 0 0 0
  1979 - 0 0 0 0 0 0
  1983 - 0 0 0 0 0 0
  1987 - 0 0 0 0 0 0
1991 – present See San Marino national under-20 team
Total 0/10 0 0 0 0 0 0

ManagersEdit

From 1986 to present days:

Dates Name
1986–1990   Giulio Casali
1990–1996   Giorgio Leoni
1996–1998   Massimo Bonini
1998–2013   Giampaolo Mazza
2014–2017   Pierangelo Manzaroli
2018-   Franco Varrella

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following is the list of players pre-selected for the 2018–19 UEFA Nations League matches against Moldova on 15 November 2018 and Belarus on 18 November 2018.[38]
Caps and goals as of 18 November 2018 after the game against Belarus.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Elia Benedettini (1995-06-22) 22 June 1995 (age 23) 13 0   Novara
1GK Simone Benedettini (1997-01-21) 21 January 1997 (age 21) 0 0   Pianese
1GK Matteo Zavoli (1996-07-06) 6 July 1996 (age 22) 0 0   Libertas

2DF Davide Simoncini (captain) (1986-08-30) 30 August 1986 (age 32) 55 0   Libertas
2DF Fabio Vitaioli (1984-04-05) 5 April 1984 (age 34) 51 0   Libertas
2DF Mirko Palazzi (1987-03-21) 21 March 1987 (age 31) 43 1   Tre Penne
2DF Manuel Battistini (1994-07-11) 11 July 1994 (age 24) 17 0   Libertas
2DF Davide Cesarini (1995-02-16) 16 February 1995 (age 23) 14 0   Tre Penne
2DF Andrea Grandoni (1997-03-23) 23 March 1997 (age 21) 8 0   San Marino Calcio
2DF Michele Cevoli (1998-07-28) 28 July 1998 (age 20) 3 0   San Marino Calcio

3MF Alex Gasperoni (1984-06-30) 30 June 1984 (age 34) 43 0   Tre Penne
3MF Adolfo Hirsch (1986-01-31) 31 January 1986 (age 32) 26 0   Folgore
3MF Fabio Tomassini (1996-02-05) 5 February 1996 (age 22) 12 0   Romagna Centro
3MF Alessandro Golinucci (1994-10-10) 10 October 1994 (age 24) 11 0   Tropical Coriano
3MF Enrico Golinucci (1991-07-16) 16 July 1991 (age 27) 11 0   Libertas
3MF Michael Battistini (1996-10-08) 8 October 1996 (age 22) 5 0   Juvenes Dogana
3MF Lorenzo Lunadei (1997-07-11) 11 July 1997 (age 21) 5 0   FYA Riccione
3MF Mattia Giardi (1991-12-15) 15 December 1991 (age 27) 5 0   Faetano
3MF Marcello Mularoni (1998-09-08) 8 September 1998 (age 20) 3 0   Faetano
3MF Luca Censoni (1996-07-18) 18 July 1996 (age 22) 0 0   Tre Penne

4FW Matteo Vitaioli (1989-10-27) 27 October 1989 (age 29) 53 1   Tropical Coriano
4FW Danilo Rinaldi (1986-04-18) 18 April 1986 (age 32) 38 1   La Fiorita
4FW Filippo Berardi (1997-05-18) 18 May 1997 (age 21) 6 0   Monopoli
4FW Nicola Nanni (2000-05-02) 2 May 2000 (age 18) 2 0   Crotone

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have been called up within the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Aldo Simoncini (Captain) (1986-08-30) 30 August 1986 (age 32) 60 0   Libertas v.   Luxembourg, 15 October 2018

DF Cristian Brolli (1992-02-28) 28 February 1992 (age 26) 24 0   Folgore v.   Luxembourg, 15 October 2018
DF Alex Della Valle (1990-06-13) 13 June 1990 (age 28) 9 0   Faetano v.   Luxembourg, 15 October 2018
DF Juri Biordi (1995-01-01) 1 January 1995 (age 23) 6 0   Fiorentino v.   Luxembourg, 11 September 2018

MF Luca Tosi (1992-11-04) 4 November 1992 (age 26) 18 0   Pietracuta v.   Moldova, 11 October 2018PRE

FW Mattia Stefanelli (1993-03-12) 12 March 1993 (age 25) 15 1   La Fiorita v.   Luxembourg, 15 October 2018
FW Nicolò Angelini (1992-03-15) 15 March 1992 (age 26) 0 0   Domagnano v.   Luxembourg, 15 October 2018

Coaching staffEdit

Head coach[39] Franco Varrella
Technical assistant Stefano Ceci
Fitness coach Tomaso Mazzoli
Goalkeeping coach Marcello Teodorani
Team doctor Pietro Bugli
Physiotherapist Loris Balzani
Masseur Tiziano Giacobbi
Official accompanying Cesare Vitaioli
Match analyst Lorenzo Vagnini
Warehouseman Benito Ballato
Marco Crescentini
Mauro Montanari

Kit manufacturersEdit

Period Kit provider
1990–2010   Virma
2011–2017   Adidas
2018–2022   Macron

RecordsEdit

In January 2006, the Sammarinese Football Association named Massimo Bonini as their greatest ever player.[6] Three-times Italian Serie A champion, he is the only Sammarinese player to have won an official international competition including the European Champions' Cup and the Intercontinental Cup. Bonini represented Italy at under-21 level in the early 1980s, and he played for Juventus from 1981 to 1988, but was prevented from gaining full honours due to a rule change.[6] By the time San Marino became a full UEFA member, Bonini was in his thirties, but gained 19 caps between 1990 and 1995.[40]

After retiring from playing, Bonini became San Marino's manager,[6] succeeding Giorgio Leoni. He held the position until 1998, when he was replaced by Giampaolo Mazza. As of 2012, Mazza is the longest-serving manager of any European national team. Though he gave up his position after their 2014 FIFA World Cup Qualification campaign, giving way to former u-21s boss Pierangelo Manzaroli.[41]

The appearance record for San Marino is held by Andy Selva, who has 74 caps. He is also the record goalscorer with eight goals.[42]

San Marino's player Davide Gualtieri scored the second fastest goal ever in a Fifa match against England. In the match, which took place in Bologna, Italy, San Marino had the kick-off and the ball was quickly played through the inside-right channel. England defender Stuart Pearce attempted a back-pass to goalkeeper David Seaman. Pearce's pass was under-hit and Gualtieri ran on to touch the ball past Seaman. The goal was timed at 8.3 seconds, which remains the fastest World Cup goal scored in either qualifying or the finals. England took 20 minutes to equalise and eventually finished winning the match 7–1.

Most appearancesEdit

# Name Career Caps Goals
1 Andy Selva 1998–2016 74 8
2 Damiano Vannucci 1996–2012 68 0
3 Alessandro Della Valle 2002–present 66 1
4 Aldo Simoncini 2006–present 60 0
4 Simone Bacciocchi 1998–2013 60 0
6 Davide Simoncini 2006–present 55 0
7 Matteo Vitaioli 2006–present 53 1
8 Fabio Vitaioli 2005–present 51 0
9 Mirco Gennari 1990–2003 48 0
10 Paolo Montagna 1991–2007 47 0
11 Carlo Valentini 2002–2017 46 0

All goalscorersEdit

# Name Career Goals (caps) Goals for caps Opponents and dates
1 Andy Selva 1998–2016 8 (74) 0.108   Austria, 14 October 1998
  Belgium, 28 February 2001, 6 June 2001 and 30 March 2005
  Liechtenstein, 28 April 2004
  Bosnia and Herzegovina, 4 June 2005
  Wales, 17 October 2007
  Slovakia, 11 October 2008
2 Manuel Marani 2003–2012 2 (32) 0.063   Republic of Ireland, 7 February 2007
  Malta, 14 August 2012
3 Alessandro Della Valle 2002–present 1 (66) 0.015   Poland, 10 September 2013
Matteo Vitaioli 2007–present 1 (53) 0.019   Lithuania, 8 September 2015
Mirko Palazzi 2005–present 1 (43) 0.023   Azerbaijan, 4 September 2017
Nicola Albani 2001–2011 1 (40) 0.025   Latvia, 25 April 2001
Danilo Rinaldi 2008–present 1 (38) 0.026   Malta, 14 August 2012
Nicola Bacciocchi 1991–2000 1 (33) 0.03   Turkey, 9 September 1992
Bryan Gasperoni 1994–2005 1 (28) 0.036   Liechtenstein, 20 August 2003
Mauro Valentini 1991–1999 1 (23) 0.043   Faroe Islands, 11 October 1995
Pier Domenico Della Valle 1991–2000 1 (21) 0.048   Finland, 14 December 1994
Valdes Pasolini 1990–1996 1 (18) 0.056   Romania, 27 March 1991
Nicola Ciacci 2003–2011 1 (16) 0.063   Liechtenstein, 20 August 2003
Mattia Stefanelli 2014–present 1 (15) 0.067   Norway, 11 October 2016
Davide Gualtieri 1993–1999 1 (9) 0.111   England, 17 November 1993

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

ReferencesEdit

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  2. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 13 December 2018. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  3. ^ "FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. Retrieved 15 October 2014.
  4. ^ "9 Reasons Why San Marino Really Is the Worst Football Team of All Time". complex.com. Complex Media. 9 October 2014. Retrieved 15 October 2014.
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  6. ^ a b c d "Just rewards for modest man". UEFA. Archived from the original on 20 October 2007. Retrieved 9 September 2007.
  7. ^ "Romania National Team 1990–1999". RSSSF. Retrieved 9 September 2007.
  8. ^ "European Championship 1992". RSSSF. Retrieved 10 October 2010.
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  10. ^ "World Cup 1994 qualifications". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 11 May 2011. Retrieved 10 October 2010.
  11. ^ "European Championship 1996". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 7 July 2008. Retrieved 17 October 2010.
  12. ^ "Faroes prove fearsome foes". UEFA. Archived from the original on 8 July 2007. Retrieved 23 September 2007.
  13. ^ "World Cup 1998 qualifications". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 26 January 2010. Retrieved 12 September 2010.
  14. ^ "European Championship 2000". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 1 July 2016. Retrieved 12 September 2010.
  15. ^ "Group 4: Latvia long for revenge". UEFA. Retrieved 10 October 2010.
  16. ^ "Own goal denies San Marino". UEFA. Retrieved 10 October 2010.
  17. ^ "Selva the saviour for San Marino". UEFA. Archived from the original on 7 January 2016. Retrieved 9 January 2011.
  18. ^ "World Cup 2006 qualifications". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 10 October 2010.
  19. ^ a b "San Marino 0–13 Germany: Record breakers". ESPN. Retrieved 9 September 2007.
  20. ^ "European Championship 2008". RSSSF. Retrieved 6 September 2010.
  21. ^ "Big guns fire as Poland cut loose". FIFA. Retrieved 9 January 2011.
  22. ^ "World Cup 2010 qualifications". RSSSF. Retrieved 10 October 2010.
  23. ^ "San Marino on the end of record Netherlands win". UEFA. Retrieved 7 September 2011.
  24. ^ a b c "San Marino 0–0 Estonia". BBC Sports. 15 November 2014. Retrieved 15 November 2014.
  25. ^ "World Cup (Sky Sports)". SkySports. Retrieved 2018-09-06.
  26. ^ DigitalFC. "Stadio Olimpico, home to San Marino, SS Cosmos, SS Folgore Falciano Calcio, AC Juvenes/Dogana, San Marino Calcio, SP La Fiorita, AC Libertas - Football Ground Map". www.footballgroundmap.com. Retrieved 2018-09-06.
  27. ^ a b "Does Size Matter?" (PDF). Football Supporters Federation. Archived from the original (PDF) on 26 June 2008. Retrieved 9 September 2007. (pdf)
  28. ^ "Ireland stumble past San Marino". Irish Times. Retrieved 14 October 2007.
  29. ^ "San Marino 1–2 Rep of Ireland". BBC. 7 February 2007. Retrieved 14 October 2007.
  30. ^ "Gibraltar given full UEFA membership at London Congress". BBC Sport. 24 May 2013. Retrieved 24 May 2013.
  31. ^ "FIFA Rankings – San Marino". FIFA. Retrieved 10 October 2007.
  32. ^ Various (2006). Power, Corruption and Pies Volume 2. WSC Books. p. 149. ISBN 978-0-9540134-8-6.
  33. ^ "Irish media heap scorn on meagre win in San Marino". Reuters. 8 February 2007. Retrieved 22 September 2007.
  34. ^ "Did You Know... San Marino Are World Record Breakers". soccerlists.wordpress.com. Retrieved 9 September 2015.
  35. ^ "Euro 2016 qualifying: San Marino score first away goal in 14 years". British Broadcasting Company. 9 September 2015. Retrieved 9 September 2015.
  36. ^ "Latest San Marino Results, Fixtures & Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 2018-09-06.
  37. ^ Vatican Football
  38. ^ https://www.fsgc.sm/nazionale-ufficializzate-le-convocazioni-per-moldavia-e-bielorussia/
  39. ^ "Pubblicazione Quadri Tecnici Biennio 2014/2015". Retrieved 15 February 2014.
  40. ^ "La scheda di Massimo Bonini". La Stampa (in Italian). 10 December 2009. Archived from the original on 4 April 2012. Retrieved 17 October 2010.
  41. ^ Ballinger, Lucy (15 November 2006). "San Marino boss out to avoid Irish drubbing". London: Daily Mail. Retrieved 7 October 2007.
  42. ^ "Selva, Andy". National Football Teams. Retrieved 12 August 2011.

External linksEdit