Nigeria women's national football team

The Nigeria national women's football team, nicknamed the Super Falcons, represents Nigeria in international women's football and is controlled by the Nigeria Football Federation. The team is by far Africa's most successful international women's football team winning a record eleven Women's Africa Cup of Nations titles, with their most recent title in 2018, after defeating South Africa in the final. The team is also the only women's national team from the Confederation of African Football to have reached the quarterfinals in both the FIFA Women's World Cup and Football at the Summer Olympics.

Nigeria
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Super Falcons
AssociationNigeria Football Federation
ConfederationCAF (Africa)
Sub-confederationWAFU (West Africa)
Head coachRandy Waldrum[1][2]
CaptainOnome Ebi
Top scorerPerpetua Nkwocha (80)[3]
FIFA codeNGA
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 45 Steady (9 December 2022)[4]
Highest23 (July 2003)
Lowest46 (August 2022)
First international
 Nigeria 5–1 Ghana 
(Nigeria; 16 February 1991)
Biggest win
 Nigeria 15–0 Niger 
(Côte d'Ivoire; 11 May 2019)
Biggest defeat
 Norway 8–0 Nigeria 
(Tingvalla IP, Sweden; 6 June 1995)
 Germany 8–0 Nigeria 
(Leverkusen, Germany; 25 November 2010)
 France 8–0 Nigeria 
(Le Mans, France; 6 April 2018)
World Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1991)
Best resultQuarter-finals (1999)
Football at the Summer Olympics
Appearances3 (first in 2000)
Best resultQuarter-finals (2004)
Women's Africa Cup of Nations
Appearances14 (first in 1991)
Best resultChampions (1991, 1995, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2016, 2018)
WAFU Zone B Women's Cup
Appearances2 (first in 2018)
Best resultChampions (2019)

They are also one of the few teams in the world to have qualified for every edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, with their best performance at the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup where they reached the quarterfinals.

HistoryEdit

They won the first seven African championships and through their first twenty years lost only five games to African competition.12 December 2002 to Ghana in Warri, 3 June 2007 at Algeria, 12 August 2007 to Ghana in an Olympic qualifier, 25 November 2008 at Equatorial Guinea in the semis of the 2008 Women's African Football Championship and May 2011 at Ghana in an All Africa Games qualification match.

The Super Falcons have been unable to dominate beyond Africa in such arenas as the FIFA Women's World Cup or the Olympic Games however. The team has been to every World Cup since 1991, but managed just once to finish in the top eight. In 2003, the Super Falcons turned out to be the biggest disappointment of the first round, failing to score a single goal and losing all three Group A matches. They did little better in 2007, drawing only one of their Group B matches. However, they faced the group of death in both 2003 and 2007, grouped both times with rising Asian power North Korea, traditional European power Sweden, and a historic women's superpower in the USA.

Nigeria hosted the African women's championship finals for the third time in 2006 which were then canceled due to a severe outbreak of gang induced violence within the Nigerian area, replacing Gabon, which was initially granted the right to host but later pulled out citing financial difficulties, and won it for the seventh time in a row. Nigeria's Super Falcons and Ghana's Black Queens represented Africa in China for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup.

 
Super Falcons after a training session

The "Falconets" are the country's junior team (U-20), which performed creditably in the 2006 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup held in Russia when they beat Finland 8–0 before they were sent packing by Brazil in the Quarter-finals. They were the runner-up to Germany at the 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup. Nigeria also played in the 2014 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup held in Canada and lost to Germany in the finals 0–1, Asisat Oshoala got both the golden ball and golden boot.

The "Flamingoes" are the country's cadet team (U-17), which qualified for the inaugural women's U-17 World Cup New Zealand 2008. Nigeria qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup where they were placed in Group A with South Korea, Norway and hosts France.

Team imageEdit

NicknamesEdit

The Nigeria women's national football team has been known or nicknamed as the "Super Falcons".

FIFA world rankingsEdit

As of 17 July 2021[5]

  Worst Ranking    Best Ranking    Worst Mover    Best Mover  

Nigeria's FIFA world rankings
Rank Year Games
Played
Won Lost Drawn Best Worst
Rank Move Rank Move
38 2021 6 3 2 1 37   0 38   1

Results and fixturesEdit

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

Legend

  Win   Draw   Lose   Fixture

2022Edit

18 February 2022 AFWCON qualification Second round 1st leg Nigeria   2–0   Ivory Coast Abuja, Nigeria
  • Onumonu   21', 56'
Report Stadium: Moshood Abiola National Stadium
Referee: Ayawa Mana Mawoufemo (Togo)
23 February 2022 AFWCON qualification Second round 2nd leg Ivory Coast   0–1
(0–3 agg.)
  Nigeria Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire
Report
Stadium: Stade Robert Champroux
Referee: Zouwaira Souley Sani (Niger)
Note: Nigeria won 3–0 on aggregate.
8 April Friendly Canada   2–0   Nigeria Vancouver, Canada
3:30am (SAT)
Report Stadium: BC Place
11 April Friendly Canada   2–2   Nigeria Langford, Canada
19:30 UTC−7
Report
Stadium: Starlight Stadium
Referee: Crystal Sobers (Trinidad and Tobago)
4 July 2022 (2022-07-04) 2022 AFWCON GS Nigeria   1–2   South Africa Rabat, Maroc
18:00
Stadium: Stade Moulay Hassan
Referee: Bouchra Karboubi (Morocco)
7 July 2022 (2022-07-07) 2022 AFWCON GS Botswana   0–2   Nigeria Rabat, Maroc
21:00 Stadium: Stade Moulay Hassan
10 July 2022 (2022-07-10) 2022 AFWCON GS Nigeria   4–0   Burundi Rabat, Maroc
21:00 Stadium: Stade Moulay Hassan
14 July 2022 (2022-07-14) 2022 AFWCON QF Cameroon   0–1   Nigeria Casablanca, Morocco
18:00 Report (FIFA)
Stadium: Stade Mohammed V
Referee: Akhona Makalima (South Africa)
18 July 2022 (2022-07-18) 2022 AFWCON SF Morocco   1–1 (a.e.t.)
(5–4 p)
  Nigeria Rabat, Morocco
Stadium: Prince Moulay Abdellah Stadium
Penalties
22 July 2022 (2022-07-22) 2022 AFWCON 3rd place Nigeria   0–1   Zambia Stade Mohammed V, Casablanca, Morocco
Stadium: Stade Mohammed V
3 September Friendly United States   4–0   Nigeria Kansas City, Kansas
13:00 ET
Stadium: Children's Mercy Park
Attendance: 14,502
Referee: Melissa Borjas (Honduras)
6 September Friendly United States   2–1   Nigeria Washington, D.C.
18:00 ET
Stadium: Audi Field
Attendance: 18,869
Referee: Odette Hamilton (Jamaica)
6 October Friendly Japan   2–0   Nigeria Kobe, Japan
16:28 UTC+9
Report (JFA)
Report (JFA)
Stadium: Noevir Stadium Kobe
Attendance: 1,671
Referee: Kate Jacewicz (Australia)

2023Edit

15 February 2023 (2023-02-15) 2023 Women's Revelations Cup Mexico   v   Nigeria León, Mexico
--:-- UTC−5
18 February 2023 (2023-02-18) 2023 Women's Revelations Cup Colombia   v   Nigeria León, Mexico
--:-- UTC−5
21 February 2023 (2023-02-21) 2023 Women's Revelations Cup Costa Rica   v   Nigeria León, Mexico
17:00 UTC−5
21 July 2023 (2023-07-21) FIFA WC Group Nigeria   v   Canada Melbourne, Australia
Report Stadium: Melbourne Rectangular Stadium
27 July 2023 (2023-07-27) FIFA WC Group Australia   v   Nigeria Brisbane, Australia
Report Stadium: Lang Park
31 July 2023 (2023-07-31) FIFA WC Group Republic of Ireland   v   Nigeria Brisbane, Australia
Report Stadium: Lang Park

Coaching staffEdit

Current coaching staffEdit

As of 6 November 2020
Name Role Ref.
  Randy Waldrum Head coach [1][2]

Manager historyEdit

Name Start date End date Notes Ref
  Jo Bonfrere managed Nigeria at 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup, concurrently with the men's national team of Nigeria.[6]
  Paul Hamilton regarded as the first coach of the women national team; managed Nigeria at 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup[7][8]
  Ismaila Mabo managed Nigeria to quarter finals at 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup, thus regarded as the most successful coach;[9][10] led Nigeria to 2000 Olympics and 2004 Olympics
  Samuel Okpodu 2002 managed Nigeria at 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup
Godwin Izilien managed Nigeria to win 2004 African Women's Championship[11]
  Ntiero Effiom managed Nigeria at 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup; led Nigeria to win 2003 All-Africa Games[12]
  Joseph Ladipo managed Nigeria at 2008 Olympics; led Nigeria to win 2007 All-Africa Games;[13] managed Nigeria to third-place finish at 2008 African Women's Championship[14][15]
  Uche Eucharia October 2011 managed Nigeria to win 2010 African Women's Championship; managed Nigeria at 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup [16]
  Kadiri Ikhana April 2012 November 2012 led Nigeria to fourth place at 2012 African Women's Championship [17]
  Edwin Okon June 2015 managed Nigeria to win 2014 African Women's Championship; managed Nigeria at 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup [18]
  Christopher Danjuma September 2015 led Nigeria to fourth place at 2015 All-Africa Games [19]
  Florence Omagbemi February 2016 December 2016 led Nigeria to win 2016 Africa Women Cup of Nations [20][21]
  Thomas Dennerby January 2018 October 2019 led Nigeria to win at 2019 WAFU Zone B Women's Cup [22][23][24]
  Randy Waldrum 2020 [1][2]

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

Coach:   Randy Waldrum

The squad was announced on 26 January 2023 for the 2023 Women's Revelations Cup.[25]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Club
1GK Chiamaka Nnadozie (2000-12-08) 8 December 2000 (age 22)   Paris FC
1GK Yewande Balogun (1989-09-28) 28 September 1989 (age 33)   Saint-Étienne

2DF Onome Ebi (1983-05-08) 8 May 1983 (age 39)   Levante Las Planas
2DF Osinachi Ohale (1991-12-21) 21 December 1991 (age 31)   Deportivo Alavés
2DF Ashleigh Plumptre (1998-05-08) 8 May 1998 (age 24)   Leicester City
2DF Glory Ogbonna (1998-12-25) 25 December 1998 (age 24)   ALG Spor
2DF Rofiat Imuran (2004-06-17) 17 June 2004 (age 18)   Reims
2DF Michelle Alozie (1997-04-28) 28 April 1997 (age 25)   Houston Dash
2DF Oluwatosin Demehin (2002-03-13) 13 March 2002 (age 20)   Reims
2DF Akudo Ogbonna (2000-04-09) 9 April 2000 (age 22)   Rivers Angels

3MF Halimatu Ayinde (1995-05-16) 16 May 1995 (age 27)   Rosengård
3MF Christy Ucheibe (2000-12-25) 25 December 2000 (age 22)   Benfica
3MF Ngozi Okobi-Okeoghene (1993-12-14) 14 December 1993 (age 29)   Eskilstuna United
3MF Rasheedat Ajibade (1999-12-08) 8 December 1999 (age 23)   Atlético Madrid
3MF Toni Payne (1995-04-22) 22 April 1995 (age 27)   Sevilla
3MF Onyi Echegini (2001-03-22) 22 March 2001 (age 21)   Florida State Seminoles
3MF Regina Otu (1996-08-05) 5 August 1996 (age 26)   Saint-Étienne

4FW Asisat Oshoala (1994-10-09) 9 October 1994 (age 28)   Barcelona
4FW Esther Okoronkwo (1997-03-27) 27 March 1997 (age 25)   Saint-Étienne
4FW Ifeoma Onumonu (1994-02-25) 25 February 1994 (age 28)   NJ/NY Gotham
4FW Chinwendu Ihezuo (1997-04-30) 30 April 1997 (age 25)   Monterrey
4FW Francisca Ordega (1993-10-19) 19 October 1993 (age 29)   CSKA Moscow
4FW Uchenna Kanu (1997-06-20) 20 June 1997 (age 25)   Racing Louisville FC

Recent call-upsEdit

Following players have been called up to a squad in the past 12 months.

This list may be incomplete.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Rita Akarekor (2001-02-13) 13 February 2001 (age 21)   Nasarawa Amazons F.C. 2022 Women's Africa Cup of NationsPRE
GK Christy Ohiaeriaku (1996-12-13) 13 December 1996 (age 26)   Sunshine Queens 2022 AFWCON qualification

DF Opeyemi Sunday (1999-07-12) 12 July 1999 (age 23)   Edo Queens 2022 Women's Africa Cup of NationsPRE
DF Ugochi Emenayo (1997-12-20) 20 December 1997 (age 25)   Konak Belediyespor 2022 Women's Africa Cup of NationsPRE
DF Joy Duru (1999-12-23) 23 December 1999 (age 23)   Nasarawa Amazons F.C. 2022 AFWCON qualification
DF Rofiat Imuran (2004-06-17) 17 June 2004 (age 18)   Rivers Angels
DF Ayomide Ojo   Edo Queens 2022 AFWCON qualification

MF Ihuoma Onyebuchi (1997-12-10) 10 December 1997 (age 25)   Sunshine Queens Aisha Buhari Cup
MF Deborah Abiodun (2003-11-02) 2 November 2003 (age 19)   Rivers Angels 2022 AFWCON qualification
MF Yetunde Aluko (1995-12-26) 26 December 1995 (age 27)   Hapoel Katamon Jerusalem 2022 AFWCON qualification
MF Grace Igboamalu (2001-12-29) 29 December 2001 (age 21)   Bayelsa Queens F.C. 2022 AFWCON qualification
MF Amarachi Okoronkwo (1992-12-12) 12 December 1992 (age 30)   Nasarawa Amazons F.C. 2022 AFWCON qualification
MF Amanda Mbadi (1999-01-04) 4 January 1999 (age 24)   Thonon Évian 2022 Women's Africa Cup of NationsPRE
MF Charity Adule (1993-11-07) 7 November 1993 (age 29)   Alhama CF 2022 Women's Africa Cup of NationsPRE
MF Suliat Abideen   Edo Queens F.C. 2022 Women's Africa Cup of NationsPRE

FW Joy Bokiri (1998-12-29) 29 December 1998 (age 24)   Saint-Étienne Aisha Buhari Cup
FW Juliet Bassey (1999-10-03) 3 October 1999 (age 23)   Bayelsa Queens F.C. 2022 AFWCON qualification
FW Desire Oparanozie (1993-12-17) 17 December 1993 (age 29)   Wuhan Chegu Jianghan 2022 Women's Africa Cup of NationsPRE
FW Anam Imo (2000-11-30) 30 November 2000 (age 22)   Piteå IF 2022 Women's Africa Cup of NationsPRE

Previous squadsEdit

Bold indicates winning squads

CaptainsEdit

RecordsEdit

*Active players in bold, statistics as of November 2020.

HonoursEdit

IntercontinentalEdit

ContinentalEdit

  Champions: 1991, 1995, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2010, 2014, 2016, 2018

RegionalEdit

Other tournamentsEdit

AwardsEdit

Competitive recordEdit

FIFA Women's World CupEdit

FIFA Women's World Cup record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
  1991 Group stage 10th 3 0 0 3 0 7
  1995 11th 3 0 1 2 5 14
  1999 Quarter-finals 7th 4 2 0 2 8 12
  2003 Group stage 15th 3 0 0 3 0 11
  2007 13th 3 0 1 2 1 4
  2011 9th 3 1 0 2 1 2
  2015 21st 3 0 1 2 3 6
  2019 Round of 16 16th 4 1 0 3 2 7
   2023 qualified
Total 9/9 - 26 4 3 19 20 63
FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
  1991 Group stage 17 November   Germany L 0–4 Jiangmen Stadium, Jiangmen
19 November   Italy L 0–1 Zhongshan Stadium, Zhongshan
21 November   Chinese Taipei L 0–2 Jiangmen Stadium, Jiangmen
  1995 Group stage 6 June   Norway L 0–8 Tingvallen, Karlstad
8 June   Canada D 3–3 Olympia Stadion, Helsingborg
10 June   England L 2–3 Tingvallen, Karlstad
  1999 Group stage 20 June   North Korea W 2–1 Rose Bowl, Pasadena
24 June   United States L 1–7 Soldier Field, Chicago
27 June   Denmark W 2–0 Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, Landover
Quarter-finals 1 July   Brazil L 3–4
  2003 Group stage 20 September   North Korea L 0–3 Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia
25 September   United States L 0–5
28 September   Sweden L 0–3 Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
  2007 Group stage 11 September   Sweden D 1–1 Chengdu Sports Center, Chengdu
14 September   North Korea L 0–2
18 September   United States L 0–1 Hongkou Stadium, Shanghai
  2011 Group stage 26 June   France L 0–1 Rhein-Neckar-Arena, Sinsheim
30 June   Germany L 0–1 Commerzbank-Arena, Frankfurt
5 July   Canada W 1–0 Rudolf-Harbig-Stadion, Dresden
  2015 Group stage 8 June   Sweden D 3–3 Winnipeg Stadium, Winnipeg
12 June   Australia L 0–2
16 June   United States L 0–1 BC Place, Vancouver
  2019 Group stage 8 June   Norway L 0–3 Stade Auguste-Delaune, Reims
12 June   South Korea W 2–0 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble
17 June   France L 0–1 Roazhon Park, Rennes
Round of 16 22 June   Germany L 0–3 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble

Olympic GamesEdit

Summer Olympics record
Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
  1996 did not qualify
  2000 Group stage 3 0 0 3 3 9
  2004 Quarter-finals 3 1 0 2 3 4
  2008 Group stage 3 0 0 3 1 5
  2012 did not qualify
  2016
  2021
Total 3/6 9 1 0 8 7 18

Africa Women Cup of NationsEdit

Africa Women Cup of Nations record
Year Round Pld W D L GF GA
1991 Champions 6 6 0 0 20 2
1995 Champions 6 6 0 0 27 2
  1998 Champions 5 5 0 0 28 0
  2000 Champions 5 4 1 0 19 2
  2002 Champions 5 4 0 1 15 2
  2004 Champions 5 4 1 0 18 2
  2006 Champions 5 5 0 0 18 2
  2008 Third place 5 1 3 1 3 3
  2010 Champions 5 5 0 0 19 4
  2012 Fourth place 5 3 0 2 8 4
  2014 Champions 5 5 0 0 16 3
  2016 Champions 5 4 1 0 13 1
  2018 Champions 5 2 2 1 10 1
  2022 Fourth place 6 3 1 2 9 4
Total 11 Titles 73 57 9 7 223 32

African GamesEdit

African Games record
Year Round Pld W D L GF GA
  2003 Champions 5 5 0 0 17 1
  2007 Champions 4 3 1 0 14 2
  2011 did not qualify
  2015 Fourth place 5 2 0 3 11 7
  2019 See Nigeria women's national under-20 football team
  2023 to be determined
Total 3/4 14 10 1 3 42 10

Turkish Women's CupEdit

  Turkish Women's Cup record
Year Result GP W D L GF GA GD
2021 1st 3 3 0 0 11 0 +11
Total 1/5 3 3 0 0 11 0 +11

WAFU Women's Cup recordEdit

WAFU Zone B Women's Cup
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
  2018 3rd 3rd 5 4 1 3 10 3
  2019 Winner 1st 5 3 2 0 23 2
Total Group Stage 1/1 3 0 0 3 1 17

All−time record against FIFA recognized nationsEdit

The list shown below shows the Djibouti national football team all−time international record against opposing nations.
*As of xxxxxx after match against xxxx.

Key
  Positive balance (more wins than losses)
  Neutral balance (as many wins as losses)
  Negative balance (more losses than wins)
Against Pld W D L GF GA GD Confederation

Record per opponentEdit

*As ofxxxxx after match against xxxxx.

Key
  Positive balance (more wins than losses)
  Neutral balance (as many wins as losses)
  Negative balance (more losses than wins)

The following table shows Djibouti's all-time official international record per opponent:

Opponent Pld W D L GF GA GD W% Confederation
Total

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Randy Waldrum is new Super Falcons' Head Coach". thenff.com. thenff. Archived from the original on 27 October 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "OFFICIAL: NFF Announce Randy Waldrum AS New Super Falcons Head Coach". MySportDab. Adedotun. Archived from the original on 9 October 2020. Retrieved 6 October 2020.
  3. ^ a b "AFRICAN LEGEND OF THE WEEK: PERPETUA NKWOCHA". Goal.com. 9 March 2017. Archived from the original on 9 February 2021. Retrieved 28 November 2017.
  4. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 9 December 2022. Retrieved 9 December 2022.
  5. ^ "FIFA NIGERIA WOMEN'S RANKING". FIFA. 25 June 2021. Archived from the original on 16 July 2021. Retrieved 17 July 2021.
  6. ^ Anthony, Janine (14 April 2016). "China '91, 25 years on: Celebrating the Nigeria Super Falcons". Unusual Efforts. Archived from the original on 18 June 2020. Retrieved 20 August 2019.
  7. ^ "Former Super Eagles coach, Paul Hamilton, is dead". The Punch. 30 March 2017. Archived from the original on 12 April 2021. Retrieved 27 May 2018.
  8. ^ "NFF pays tributes to late 'Wonderboy' Paul Hamilton". Vanguard News. 30 March 2017. Archived from the original on 31 May 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  9. ^ "WOMEN'S WORLD CUP; Flamboyant Nigeria Plays Exuberantly". New York Times. 23 June 1999. Archived from the original on 31 December 2019. Retrieved 27 May 2018.
  10. ^ "Falcons loss to Ghana, not a surprise – Mabo". Punch. Archived from the original on 27 October 2020. Retrieved 27 May 2018.
  11. ^ Akpodonor, Gowon (30 December 2016). "Agony of ex-Super Falcons coach, Godwin Izilien 12 years after Nations Cup triumph in South Africa". The Guardian. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  12. ^ Sotuminu, Dapo (14 January 2018). "Nigerian national team coaches that died in penury". New Telegraph. Archived from the original on 28 July 2018. Retrieved 10 May 2018.
  13. ^ "Coaches react to death of Jossy Lad". Vanguard. 9 May 2013. Archived from the original on 31 December 2019. Retrieved 11 May 2018.
  14. ^ Paul, Sam (10 October 2014). "AWC: Can Super Falcons Conquer Africa Again?". PM News. Archived from the original on 31 December 2019. Retrieved 11 May 2018.
  15. ^ "Nigeria/Ghana: 2008 African Women Championship - Super Falcons Begin Campaign Against Ghana Today". Leadership. Retrieved 11 May 2018.
  16. ^ "Eucharia Uche, Super Falcons Coach, Sacked". onlinenigeria. 25 October 2011. Archived from the original on 10 November 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  17. ^ "Kadiri Ikhana Quits As Coach Of Nigeria's National Female Soccer Team, Super Falcons". Sahara Reporters. 12 November 2012. Archived from the original on 11 February 2021. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  18. ^ "Edwin Okon fired, interim coach Danjuma takes over Super Falcons | Goal.com". www.goal.com. Archived from the original on 7 May 2021. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  19. ^ "NFF Appoints Florence Omagbemi Super Falcons Coach". 18 February 2016. Archived from the original on 26 February 2022. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  20. ^ https://sg.news.yahoo.com/florence-omagbemi-appointed-interim-coach-071200397.html[dead link]
  21. ^ "Omagbemi out of running for Nigeria role". Archived from the original on 14 September 2021. Retrieved 14 September 2021 – via www.bbc.com.
  22. ^ admin (25 January 2018). "NFF signs top Swedish coach, Dennerby, for Super Falcons". Nigeria Football Federation. Archived from the original on 17 June 2021. Retrieved 30 April 2018.
  23. ^ Abayomi, Tosin. "NFF unveil new Super Falcons coach". Pulse. Archived from the original on 9 June 2018. Retrieved 30 April 2018.
  24. ^ "Super Falcons coach Thomas Dennerby quits with a year left on his contract". Pulse Nigeria. 11 October 2019. Archived from the original on 8 October 2020. Retrieved 16 November 2020.
  25. ^ Omoniyi, Oluwaferanmi (26 January 2023). "Revelation Cup: Oshoala returns to Falcons". Premium Times.

External linksEdit