South Korea women's national football team

The Korea Republic women's national football team (Korean대한민국 여자 축구 국가대표팀; Hanja大韓民國女子蹴球國家代表팀) represents South Korea in international women's football competitions. The team is referred to as the Korea Republic by the FIFA. Its first game was a match against Japan in 1990, which it lost 13–1. Since then, it has qualified for three FIFA World Cups, in 2003, 2015, and 2019 (their best result is round of 16 in 2015).

Korea Republic
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Taegeuk Nangja (Taegeuk Ladies)
AssociationKorea Football Association
ConfederationAFC (Asia)
Sub-confederationEAFF (East Asia)
Head coachColin Bell
CaptainCho So-hyun
Most capsCho So-hyun (126)[1]
Top scorerJi So-yun (58)[1]
FIFA codeKOR
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 18 Increase 2 (26 June 2020)[2]
Highest14 (December 2017, September 2018–March 2019)
Lowest26 (August 2004)
First international
 Japan 13–1 South Korea 
(Seoul, South Korea; 6 September 1990)
Biggest win
 South Korea 19–0 Northern Mariana Islands 
(Tainan County, Taiwan; 26 August 2009)
Biggest defeat
 Japan 13–1 South Korea 
(Seoul, South Korea; 6 September 1990)
World Cup
Appearances3 (first in 2003)
Best resultRound of 16 (2015)
Asian Cup
Appearances12 (first in 1991)
Best resultThird place (2003)

HistoryEdit

1949–2002: BeginningsEdit

Less than a year after the government of the Republic of Korea was established in 1948, the first official women's football matches were held in Seoul on 28 and 29 June 1949, as a part of the National Girls' and Women's Sport Games. While women's basketball and volleyball won public recognition through the Games, football was seen as being unsuitable for women and as being unattractive to the public; as a result, the girls' teams were disbanded soon after the event.[3]

When women's football was officially adopted at the 1990 Asian Games in Beijing, the South Korean sports authorities decided to form a women's team with athletes from other sports and send the team to the Games.[3] The result was defeat in all matches against Japan, North Korea, China and Chinese Taipei.[4] Nevertheless, colleges and corporations started to launch women's football teams through the 1990s and the first annual national women's football event, the Queen's Cup, was held in 1993. With these changes, South Korea was able to finish in fourth place at the 1995 AFC Women's Championship in Malaysia.[5]

When the 1999 Women's World Cup sparked interest worldwide, the South Korean ministry in charge of sports sponsored the foundation of new teams and tournaments for girls’ high school teams, university teams and company teams. To promote women’s football, the Korea Women's Football Federation (KWFF) was established in March 2001, as an independent organization in association with the Korea Football Association (KFA).[3]

2003–2013: First World Cup and a period of declineEdit

South Korea finished in third place at the 2003 AFC Women's Championship and qualified for the World Cup for the first time. The Taegeuk Ladies were drawn in Group B with Norway, France and Brazil. Their first match played at the World Cup was a 3–0 loss to Brazil on 21 September 2003. They went on to lose 1–0 to France and 7–1 to Norway. Kim Jin-hee scored the first ever South Korean World Cup goal on 27 September 2003 against Norway.

Despite winning the inaugural EAFF E-1 Football Championship on home soil in 2005, South Korea failed to qualify for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. The Taegeuk Ladies won bronze at the 2010 Asian Games and at the 2010 EAFF Women's Football Championship, but once again failed to qualify for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

2014–present: Second World CupEdit

South Korea finished in fourth place at the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup and qualified for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, where they made it out of the group stage for the first time. They were drawn in Group E with Brazil, Spain and Costa Rica. South Korea lost 2–0 to Brazil on 9 June 2015, but a 2–2 draw with Costa Rica on 13 June and a 2–1 victory against Spain on 17 June were enough to progress for the first time ever at a World Cup. They went on to lose 3–0 to France in the round of 16 on 21 June 2015.

2019 World Cup: Third World CupEdit

Coming off a somewhat successful showing at the previous one, South Korea qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup and were put in Group A with France, Norway and Nigeria. However, they could not repeat their prior success in 2015 and lost all three games and exited the tournament in the group stage, only scoring one goal in their entire run and even an own goal.

Home stadiumEdit

KitsEdit

The women's team usually use exactly the same kit as its men counterpart, along with the combinations available. However, there were many combinations that the men's team never used.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kit used in 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup match vs Brazil.

Coaching staffEdit

As of November 2020

Position Name
Manager   Colin Bell
Assistant Manager   Matt Ross
Coach   Kim Eun-jung
Goalkeeping Coach   Jeong Yuseok

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

  • Caps and goals correct as of 9 February 2019 against   Vietnam.
No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Yoon Young-geul (윤영글) (1987-10-28) 28 October 1987 (age 33) 16 0   Gyeongju KHNP
2 4FW Choo Hyo-joo (추효주) (2000-07-29) 29 July 2000 (age 20) 2 1   Ulsan College
3 2DF Kim Hye-yeong (김혜영) (1995-02-26) 26 February 1995 (age 25) 7 1   Gyeongju KHNP
4 2DF Shim Seo-yeon (심서연) (1989-04-15) 15 April 1989 (age 31) 59 0   Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
5 2DF Hong Hye-ji (홍혜지) (1996-08-25) 25 August 1996 (age 24) 22 1   Changnyeong
6 3MF Park Ye-eun (박예은) (1996-10-17) 17 October 1996 (age 24) 3 2   Gyeongju KHNP
7 3MF Lee Young-ju (이영주) (1992-04-22) 22 April 1992 (age 28) 34 2   Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
8 3MF Park Hye-jeong (박혜정) (2000-03-30) 30 March 2000 (age 20)   Korea University-Sejong Campus
9 4FW Yeo Min-ji (여민지) (1993-04-27) 27 April 1993 (age 27) 40 15   Suwon UDC
10 3MF Ji So-Yun (지소연) (1991-02-21) 21 February 1991 (age 29) 125 61   Chelsea
11 4FW Lee Geum-min (이금민) (1994-04-07) 7 April 1994 (age 26) 45 14   Manchester City
12 3MF Jang Chang (장창) (1996-06-21) 21 June 1996 (age 24) 18 0   Seoul
13 4FW Choe Yu-ri (최유리) (1994-09-16) 16 September 1994 (age 26) 25 4   Sejong Sportstoto
14 3MF Lee So-dam (이소담) (1994-10-12) 12 October 1994 (age 26) 55 6   Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
15 4FW Kang Ji-woo (강지우) (2000-05-09) 9 May 2000 (age 20) 1   Korea University-Sejong Campus
16 2DF Jang Sel-gi (장슬기) (1994-05-31) 31 May 1994 (age 26) 62 12 Unattached
17 4FW Kang Chae-rim (강채림) (1998-03-23) 23 March 1998 (age 22) 8 0   Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels
18 1GK Jeon Ha-neul (전하늘) (1992-07-06) 6 July 1992 (age 28) 0 0   Suwon UDC
19 1GK Kang Ga-Ae (강가애) (1990-12-10) 10 December 1990 (age 29) 9 0   Sejong Sportstoto
20 2DF Kim Hye-ri (김혜리) (1990-06-25) 25 June 1990 (age 30) 87 1   Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels

Recent call-upsEdit

  • The following players have been called up to the South Korea squad in the past 12 months.
Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up



Previous squadsEdit

FIFA Women's World Cup

Individual recordsEdit

  • Active players in bold, statistics as of 9 February 2020.[1]

ManagersEdit

All Time ResultsEdit

The following table shows South Korea women's all-time international record, correct as of 1 Jan 2021.

Against Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA
Total 213 91 34 85 473 255

Results and fixturesEdit

  • The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win   Draw   Lose   Fixtures

2019Edit

17 December 2019 EAFF E-1 Football Championship Final roundSouth Korea  0–1  JapanBusan, South Korea
19:30 Report Momiki   88' (pen.) Stadium: Busan Gudeok Stadium
Attendance: 4,218
Referee: Kate Jacewicz (Australia)

2020Edit

2020 FriendlyJapan  v  South KoreaUtsunomiya, Japan
Stadium: Tochigi Prefecture General Sports Zone New Stadium

2021Edit

HonoursEdit

RegionalEdit

  Champions: 2005
  Runners-up: 2015, 2019
  Runners-up: 2017

AchievementsEdit

Women's World Cup recordEdit

FIFA Women's World Cup Finals
Hosts / Year Result GP W D* L GS GA GD
  1991 Did not qualify
  1995
  1999
  2003 Group stage 3 0 0 3 1 11 −10
  2007 Did not qualify
  2011
  2015 Round of 16 4 1 1 2 4 8 −4
  2019 Group stage 3 0 0 3 1 8 −7
   2023 To be determined
Total 3/9 10 1 1 8 6 27 −21
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
FIFA Women's World Cup Finals history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
  2003 Group stage 21 September   Brazil L 0–3 RFK Stadium, Washington, D.C.
24 September   France L 0–1
27 September   Norway L 1–7 Gillette Stadium, Foxborough
  2015
Group stage 9 June   Brazil L 0–2 Olympic Stadium, Montreal
13 June   Costa Rica D 2–2
17 June   Spain W 2–1 Lansdowne Stadium, Ottawa
Round of 16 21 June   France L 0–3 Olympic Stadium, Montreal
  2019 Group stage 7 June   France L 0–4 Parc des Princes, Paris
12 June   Nigeria L 0–2 Stade des Alpes, Grenoble
17 June   Norway L 1–2 Stade Auguste-Delaune, Reims

Olympic Games recordEdit

Olympic Games Finals
Hosts / Year Result GP W D* L GS GA GD
  1996 Did not qualify
  2000
  2004
  2008
  2012
  2016
  2020 TBD - - - - - - -
Total 0/7

AFC Women's Asian Cup recordEdit

AFC Women's Asian Cup Finals
Hosts / Year Result GP W D* L GS GA GD
  1975 Did not participate
  1977
  1979
  1981
  1983
  1986
  1989
  1991 Group stage 3 0 0 3 0 22 −22
  1993 3 1 0 2 4 9 −5
  1995 Fourth place 5 2 1 2 11 5 +6
  1997 Group stage 2 1 0 1 11 1 +10
  1999 4 3 0 1 30 5 +25
  2001 Fourth place 6 4 0 2 16 10 +6
  2003 Third place 6 4 1 1 22 5 +17
  2006 Group stage 4 2 0 2 14 6 +8
  2008 3 2 0 1 5 3 +2
  2010 3 1 1 1 6 3 +3
  2014 Fourth place 5 2 1 2 18 4 +14
  2018 5th place 4 2 2 0 9 0 +9
  2022 TBD - - - - - - -
Total 12/19 48 24 6 18 146 73 +73

Asian Games recordEdit

Asian Games Finals
Hosts / Year Result GP W D L GS GA GD
  1990 5th place 5 1 0 4 2 30 −28
  1994 Fourth place 3 0 0 3 0 9 −9
  1998 Group stage 3 1 1 1 8 4 +4
  2002 Fourth place 5 2 0 3 6 8 −2
  2006 Fourth place 5 2 0 3 7 10 −3
  2010 Third place 5 3 1 1 14 4 +10
  2014 Third place 6 5 0 1 33 2 +31
  2018 Third place 6 5 0 1 32 3 +29
  2022 TBD - - - - - - -
  2026 TBD - - - - - - -
Total 8/8 38 19 2 16 102 71 +31

EAFF Women's Football Championship recordEdit

EAFF Women's Football Championship
Hosts / Year Result GP W D* L GF GA GD
  2005 Champions 3 2 1 0 3 0 +3
  2008 Fourth place 6 3 0 3 15 9 +6
  2010 Third place 7 5 0 2 47 4 +43
  2013 Third place 3 1 0 2 4 5 –1
  2015 Runners-up 6 5 0 1 29 3 +26
  2017 Fourth place 6 3 0 3 43 7 +36
  2019 Runners-up 3 1 1 1 3 1 +2
  2021 TBD - - - - - - -
Total 7/7 34 20 2 12 144 29 +115
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Algarve Cup recordEdit

The Algarve Cup is an invitational tournament for national teams in women's association football hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious and longest-running women's international football events and has been nicknamed the "Mini FIFA Women's World Cup".[6]

  Algarve Cup
Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA GD
2018 7th place 3 1 1 1 4 5 −1
Total 1/27 3 1 1 1 4 5 −1

Cyprus Women's Cup recordEdit

  Cyprus Women's Cup
Year Result GP W D L GF GA GD
2011 6th place 4 2 1 1 6 5 +1
2012 5th place 4 2 2 0 5 3 +2
2013 10th place 4 2 1 1 5 1 +4
2014 3rd place 4 1 3 0 7 3 +4
2015 11th place 4 0 1 3 3 6 −3
2017 Runners-up 4 2 1 1 4 1 +3
Total 6/13 24 9 9 6 30 19 +11

Peace Queen Cup recordEdit

  Peace Queen Cup
Hosts / Year Result GP W D L GF GA GD
  2006 Group Stage 3 0 0 3 2 6 −4
  2008 Fourth place 3 2 0 1 5 4 +1
  2010 Champions 3 1 2 0 2 1 +1
Total 3/3 9 3 2 4 9 11 –2

See alsoEdit

South Korea national teams
Women's
Men's

NotesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "각종기록" (in Korean). Korea Football Association (KFA). Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  2. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 26 June 2020. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
  3. ^ a b c Fan Hong; J.A. Mangan (23 November 2004). Soccer, Women, Sexual Liberation: Kicking off a New Era. Routledge. pp. 71–81. ISBN 978-1-135-77058-7.
  4. ^ "Asian Games 1990 (Women's Tournament)". RSSSF. Retrieved 10 July 2018.
  5. ^ Manzenreiter, Wolfram; Horne, John (14 August 2008). "Playing the Post‐Fordist Game in/to the Far East: The Footballisation of China, Japan and South Korea". Soccer & Society. 8 (4): 561–577. doi:10.1080/14660970701440899. ISSN 1466-0970.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  6. ^ "Women's game thriving in the Algarve". FIFA. 9 March 2011. Retrieved 13 March 2014.

External linksEdit

Preceded by
Inaugural Champion
EAFF Women's Football Championship
2005 (First title)
Succeeded by
2008 Japan