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Republic of Ireland women's national football team

The Republic of Ireland women's national football team represents the Republic of Ireland in competitions such as the FIFA Women's World Cup and the UEFA Women's Championship. The Republic of Ireland has yet to qualify for a major tournament. It has, however, taken part in invitational tournaments such as the Algarve Cup, the Istria Cup and the Cyprus Cup. It is organised by the Women's Football Association of Ireland.

Republic of Ireland
Nickname(s)The Girls in Green (Irish: Na cailíní i nglas)
AssociationWomen's Football Association of Ireland
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachColin Bell
CaptainKatie McCabe
Most capsEmma Byrne (134)
Top scorerOlivia O'Toole (54)
Home stadiumTallaght Stadium
FIFA codeIRL
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 31 Increase 2 (29 March 2019)[1]
Highest27 (December 2008)
Lowest38 (July 2003)
First international
 Scotland 10–1 Republic of Ireland Republic of Ireland
(Greenock, Scotland; 22 April 1973)
Biggest win
 Malta 0–9 Republic of Ireland Republic of Ireland
(Ta' Qali, Malta; 22 October 2003)
Republic of Ireland Republic of Ireland 9–0  Montenegro
(Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland; 7 June 2016)
Biggest defeat
 Sweden 10–0 Republic of Ireland Republic of Ireland
(Borås, Sweden; 20 September 1992)

Contents

HistoryEdit

In 1973 the Women's Football Association of Ireland was established[2] and in the same year on 22 April the Republic of Ireland made their international debut with a 10–1 defeat in an away friendly game against Scotland. They made their competitive debut on 19 September 1982 in a 1984 European Competition for Women's Football qualifier, also against Scotland. This time the Republic of Ireland lost just 3–0. On 2 October 1982 the Republic of Ireland gained their first competitive win when they defeated Northern Ireland 2–1 in an away game in the same competition. After losing 10–0 to Sweden in a Euro 1993 qualifier, the FAI did not enter a team in the 1995 competition.[3] This defeat against Sweden remains the team's biggest defeat.

During the 2000s the Republic of Ireland enjoyed some minor successes. In 2000 they won the Celt Cup – a four team tournament that also featured Northern Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man.[4] In their 2005 UEFA Women's Euro campaign they also won their second level group, finishing above Romania, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Malta. This would have secured promotion to the elite group of nations which competed directly for qualification to major tournaments, had the two level system not been scrapped for the next qualifying campaign. The Republic of Ireland also won their group at the 2013 Cyprus Cup, finishing above South Korea, South Africa and Northern Ireland.

The Republic of Ireland has also enjoyed some success at both under–17 and under–19 levels. In 2010, with a team that included Megan Campbell, Ciara Grant, Dora Gorman, Denise O'Sullivan, Siobhán Killeen and Clare Shine, the Republic of Ireland U-17 squad were runners-up in the 2010 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship and quarter-finalists in the 2010 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.[5] In the UEFA championship semi-final the Republic of Ireland defeated Germany 1–0.[6] With a team that included Megan Connolly, Savannah McCarthy and Katie McCabe the Republic of Ireland team won their group at the 2014 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship and qualified for the semi-finals.[7]

In April 2017, the squad demanded better treatment from the FAI and threatened to boycott a home match against Slovakia.[8] They wanted a higher match fee, and broken time payment for amateurs missing work.[8] They claimed that they had to share with underage teams the tracksuits they wore travelling to and from away matches, and change out of them in airport toilets.[8] The boycott threat was lifted when agreement on improvements was reached.[9]

Home groundsEdit

Throughout their history the Republic of Ireland have played their home games at various grounds. The most regularly used have included Dalymount Park, Tolka Park, Richmond Park and Turners Cross. They have also played occasional games at Belfield Park, Carlisle Grounds, Ferrycarrig Park, Flancare Park and in Arklow. However, since September 2013 they have played all their home games at Tallaght Stadium.

Recent results and fixturesEdit


2018Edit

2019Edit

2020Edit

Current Qualifying campaignEdit

FIFA Women's World Cup 2019Edit


Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification          
1   Norway 8 7 0 1 22 4 +18 21 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 2–1 1–0 4–1 6–1
2   Netherlands 8 6 1 1 22 2 +20 19 Play-offs 1–0 0–0 7–0 1–0
3   Republic of Ireland 8 4 1 3 10 6 +4 13 0–2 0–2 4–0 2–1
4   Northern Ireland 8 1 0 7 4 27 −23 3[a] 0–3 0–5 0–2 0–1
5   Slovakia 8 1 0 7 4 23 −19 3[a] 0–4 0–5 0–2 1–3
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Head-to-head results: Slovakia 1–3 Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland 0–1 Slovakia.

Tournament recordEdit

World CupEdit

World Cup Finals
Year Result GP W D* L GF GA GD
  1991 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  1995 Did not enter - - - - - - -
  1999 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2003 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2007 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2011 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2015 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2019 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
Total 0/8 - - - - - - -
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

European ChampionshipEdit

Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
1984 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  1987 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  1989 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  1991 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  1993 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  1995 Did not enter - - - - - - -
  &   1997 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2001 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2005 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2009 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2013 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2017 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
  2021 - - - - - - -
Total 0/12 0 0 0 0 0 0

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following players were called up for two friendly matches against   Wales, to be staged in Marbella on 28 February 2019 and 5 March 2019.[10]

The Football Association of Ireland do not publish up to date caps and goals for their female players.
No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Marie Hourihan (1987-03-10) 10 March 1987 (age 32) 8 0   Brighton & Hove Albion
1GK Grace Moloney (1993-03-01) 1 March 1993 (age 26) 1 0   Reading
1GK Courtney Brosnan (1995-11-10) 10 November 1995 (age 23)   Le Havre

2DF Harriet Scott (1993-02-10) 10 February 1993 (age 26) 5 0   Birmingham City
2DF Louise Quinn (1990-06-17) 17 June 1990 (age 29) 68 8   Arsenal
2DF Niamh Fahey (1987-10-13) 13 October 1987 (age 31) 52 0   Liverpool
2DF Heather Payne (1997-03-07) 7 March 1997 (age 22) 1 0   Bristol City
2DF Diane Caldwell (Vice-captain) (1988-09-11) 11 September 1988 (age 30) 42 1   SC Sand
2DF Claire O'Riordan (1994-10-12) 12 October 1994 (age 24) 3 0   MSV Duisburg
2DF Megan Campbell (1993-06-28) 28 June 1993 (age 25) 33 2   Manchester City
2DF Eabha O'Mahony (2002-05-17) 17 May 2002 (age 17) 0 0   Cork City

3MF Megan Connolly (1997-03-07) 7 March 1997 (age 22) 19 1   Brighton & Hove Albion
3MF Tyler Toland (2001-08-08) 8 August 2001 (age 17) 7 0   Sion Swifts
3MF Denise O'Sullivan (1994-02-04) 4 February 1994 (age 25) 71 9   North Carolina Courage
3MF Niamh Farrelly (1999-04-15) 15 April 1999 (age 20) 0 0   Peamount United
3MF Jessica Ziu (2002-06-16) 16 June 2002 (age 17) 1 0   Shelbourne

4FW Amber Barrett (1996-01-10) 10 January 1996 (age 23) 9 1   Peamount United
4FW Leanne Kiernan (1999-04-27) 27 April 1999 (age 20) 15 5   West Ham
4FW Emily Whelan (2002-08-02) 2 August 2002 (age 16) 1 0   Shelbourne
4FW Katie McCabe (Captain) (1995-09-21) 21 September 1995 (age 23) 17 3   Arsenal

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players have also been called up to the Republic of Ireland squad within the last 12 months.[11][12][13][14][15][16][17]

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Amanda Budden (1997-03-07) 7 March 1997 (age 22) 1 0   Cork City v.   Northern Ireland, 31 August 2018
GK Amanda McQuillan (1998-03-24) 24 March 1998 (age 21)   Shelbourne v.   Norway, 8/12 June 2018

DF Shauna Brennan (2003-11-26) 26 November 2003 (age 15)   Galway v.   Belgium, 20 January 2019
DF Sophie Perry (1986-11-11) 11 November 1986 (age 32) 24 0   Brighton & Hove Albion v.   Poland, 9 October 2018
DF Claire Walsh (1994-10-28) 28 October 1994 (age 24)   Peamount United v.   Netherlands, 10 April 2018

MF Rebecca Cooke (2002-10-30) 30 October 2002 (age 16)   Shelbourne v.   Belgium, 20 January 2019
MF Aislinn Meaney (1998-10-24) 24 October 1998 (age 20)   Galway v.   Poland, 9 October 2018
MF Ruesha Littlejohn (1990-07-03) 3 July 1990 (age 28) 54 6   London Bees v.   Poland, 9 October 2018
MF Zara Foley (2002-04-11) 11 April 2002 (age 17)   Cork City v.   Poland, 9 October 2018
MF Karen Duggan RET (1991-05-29) 29 May 1991 (age 28) 35   Peamount United v.   Norway, 8/12 June 2018
MF Amy Boyle Carr (2001-01-06) 6 January 2001 (age 18)   Sion Swifts v.   Netherlands, 10 April 2018
MF Roma McLaughlin (1998-03-06) 6 March 1998 (age 21)   Shelbourne v.   Netherlands, 10 April 2018

FW Isibeal Atkinson (2001-07-17) 17 July 2001 (age 17)   Shelbourne v.   Belgium, 20 January 2019
FW Emily Kraft (2002-02-18) 18 February 2002 (age 17) 1 0   FFC Frankfurt U17 v.   Belgium, 20 January 2019
FW Rianna Jarrett (1994-07-05) 5 July 1994 (age 24)   Wexford Youths v.   Poland, 9 October 2018
FW Dearbhaile Beirne (1998-05-08) 8 May 1998 (age 21)   Peamount United v.   Poland, 9 October 2018
FW Áine O'Gorman RET (1989-05-13) 13 May 1989 (age 30) 100 13   Peamount United v.   Northern Ireland, 31 August 2018

INJ Withdrew from squad due to injury
PRE Preliminary squad / standby
RET Player retired from the national team
U21 Player has linked up with the under-21 team

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 29 March 2019. Retrieved 29 March 2019.
  2. ^ Fan Hong, J. A. Mangan (2004). Soccer, Women, Sexual Liberation: Kicking Off a New Era. Frank Cass Publishers.
  3. ^ "Irish goalkeeping great Sue Hayden". womensfootballarchive.com. Retrieved 20 February 2016.
  4. ^ Garin, Erik (20 October 2003). "1st Celt Cup - Women Tournament - 2000". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 24 December 2013.
  5. ^ "UEFA.com - Women's Under-17 2010 - Republic of Ireland-Sweden". www.uefa.com.
  6. ^ "UEFA.com - Women's Under-17 2010 - Republic of Ireland-Germany". www.uefa.com.
  7. ^ "Women's Under-19 2014 - Sweden-Republic of Ireland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com.
  8. ^ a b c "Ireland women's team withdraw from training". RTÉ.ie. 5 April 2017. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  9. ^ "Agreement reached between FAI and Women's National Team". RTÉ.ie. 6 April 2017. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  10. ^ "Ireland WNT: Squad named for Wales double-header". Football Association of Ireland. 22 February 2019. Retrieved 24 February 2019.
  11. ^ "Ireland WNT: Bell names 18-player squad for Poland". Football Association of Ireland. 28 September 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  12. ^ "Bell selects squad for Northern Ireland qualifier". Football Association of Ireland. 24 August 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  13. ^ "Ireland WNT: Bell announces squad for Norway qualifiers". Football Association of Ireland. 30 May 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  14. ^ "WNT: Squad announced for World Cup qualifiers". Football Association of Ireland. 29 March 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  15. ^ "Ireland WNT: Scott confident of Netherlands upset". Football Association of Ireland. 27 November 2017. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  16. ^ "Ireland WNT: Megan Connolly excited for international future". Football Association of Ireland. 18 January 2019. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  17. ^ "Ireland WNT: Four second-half goals ensure Poland defeat". Football Association of Ireland. 9 October 2018. Retrieved 20 October 2018.

External linksEdit