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Canada women's national soccer team

The Canada women's national soccer team represents Canada in international soccer competitions at the senior women's level. The team is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

Canada
Shirt badge/Association crest
Association Canadian Soccer Association
Confederation CONCACAF (North America, Central America and the Caribbean)
Head coach John Herdman[1]
Captain Christine Sinclair
Most caps Christine Sinclair (255)
Top scorer Christine Sinclair (167)
FIFA code CAN
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 5 Decrease 1 (March 24, 2017)
Highest 4 (August–December 2016)
Lowest 13 (December 2005)
First international
 United States 2–0 Canada 
(Blaine, United States; July 7, 1986)
Biggest win
 Canada 21–0 Puerto Rico 
(Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada; August 28, 1998)
Biggest defeat
 United States 9–1 Canada 
(Dallas, United States; May 19, 1995)
 United States 9–1 Canada 
(Sydney, Australia; June 2, 2000)
 Norway 9–1 Canada 
(Honefoss, Norway; June 19, 2001)
World Cup
Appearances 6 (first in 1995)
Best result 4th place (2003)
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup
Appearances 6 (first in 1991)
Best result Gold medal with cup.svg Winners: 2 (1998, 2010)
Olympics
Appearances 3 (first in 2008)
Best result Bronze medal.svg Bronze: 2 (2012, 2016)

The team reached international prominence at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, losing in the third place match to the United States.[2] Canada qualified for its first Olympic women's soccer tournament in 2008, making it to the quarterfinals.[3] Canada are two-time CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup champions, and two-time Olympic bronze medalists from London 2012 where they defeated France 1–0 in Coventry and from Rio de Janeiro 2016, after defeating hosts Brazil 2–1 in São Paulo.[4]

A certain segment of the Canadian women's soccer fans are closely linked to the U-20 team (U-19 prior to 2006), partly due to Canada hosting the inaugural FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship in 2002, a tournament in which the team won silver in front of 47,784 fans at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, Alberta.[5] Canada also hosted the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, where they were eliminated in the quarterfinals by England. Canada set the tournament and team record for attendance in the process, with 1,353,506 and 54,027 respectively.[6]

Contents

HistoryEdit

The Canada women's team played its first international in 1986, a 2–0 away loss to the United States.[7][8] The team's first major tournament was the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden, where the team achieved one draw and two losses in group play and failed to advance.[9] Its first success in a major tournament was the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup in the United States, where Canada finished in fourth place, their first time reaching the semifinals of a major global tournament.[10] Canada's best finish in any major global tournament was its third-place finish at both the 2012 and 2016 Summer Olympics.[11]

Captain Christine Sinclair has been called the "backbone" of the Canadian national team, achieving her 250th cap in 16 years with the team in 2016.[12][13] She was named Canada Soccer's female player of the year every year from 2004 to 2014, and has been nominated for FIFA's Women's World Player of the Year.[14] Despite speculation otherwise, she confirmed in 2016 that she plans to compete in the 2019 Women's World Cup and the 2020 Olympics.[12] She also added prior to the 2016 Olympics that "The young players coming into this Olympic squad have brought an energy and passion to our team and they have risen the bar."[15]

RecordEdit

World CupEdit

Year Result Rank Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
  1991 Did not qualify
  1995 Group stage 10/12 3 0 1 2 5 13
  1999 Group stage 12/16 3 0 1 2 3 12
  2003 Fourth place 4/16 6 3 0 3 10 10
  2007 Group stage 9/16 3 1 1 1 7 4
  2011 Group stage 16/16 3 0 0 3 1 7
  2015 Quarterfinals 6/24 5 2 2 1 4 3
Total 6/7 23 6 5 12 30 49

Olympic GamesEdit

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
  1996 Did not qualify
  2000 Did not qualify
  2004 Did not qualify
  2008 Eighth place 4 1 1 2 5 6
  2012 Third Place 6 3 1 2 12 8
  2016 Third Place 6 5 0 1 10 5
Total 3/6 16 9 2 5 27 19

CONCACAF ChampionshipEdit

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA
  1991 Runners-up 5 4 0 1 23 5
  1994 Runners-up 4 3 0 1 18 6
  1998 Champions 5 5 0 0 42 0
   2002 Runners-up 5 4 0 1 26 3
  2006 Runners-up 2 1 0 1 5 2
  2010 Champions 5 5 0 0 17 0
  2014 Did not participate
Total 6/7 26 22 0 4 131 16

Minor tournamentsEdit

Recent schedule and resultsEdit

2016Edit

2017Edit

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

The following players have been named to the squad for friendlies against   Sweden and   Germany on 6 and 9 April 2017, respectively.[16]

Head coach:   John Herdman

Caps and goals are current as of April 9, 2017 after match against   Germany.
0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Stephanie Labbé (1986-10-10) October 10, 1986 (age 30) 42 0   Washington Spirit
18 1GK Sabrina D'Angelo (1993-05-11) May 11, 1993 (age 24) 5 0   North Carolina Courage
21 1GK Kailen Sheridan (1995-07-16) July 16, 1995 (age 21) 3 0   Sky Blue FC
1GK Erin McLeod (1983-02-26) February 26, 1983 (age 34) 115 0   FC Rosengård

2 2DF Allysha Chapman (1989-01-25) January 25, 1989 (age 28) 43 1   Boston Breakers
3 2DF Kadeisha Buchanan (1995-11-05) November 5, 1995 (age 21) 69 3   Lyon
4 2DF Shelina Zadorsky (1992-08-24) August 24, 1992 (age 24) 29 1   Washington Spirit
10 2DF Ashley Lawrence (1995-06-11) June 11, 1995 (age 21) 52 4   PSG
20 2DF Shannon Woeller (1990-01-31) January 31, 1990 (age 27) 18 0   FF USV Jena
22 2DF Lindsay Agnew (1995-03-31) March 31, 1995 (age 22) 3 0   Washington Spirit
24 2DF Hannah Taylor (1999-06-07) June 7, 1999 (age 17) 0 0   Eastside FC
26 2DF Marie Levasseur (1997-05-18) May 18, 1997 (age 20) 7 0   Memphis Tigers

11 3MF Desiree Scott (1987-07-31) July 31, 1987 (age 29) 124 0   FC Kansas City
13 3MF Sophie Schmidt (1988-06-28) June 28, 1988 (age 28) 161 18   1. FFC Frankfurt
17 3MF Jessie Fleming (1998-03-11) March 11, 1998 (age 19) 43 3   UCLA Bruins
19 3MF Gabrielle Carle (1998-10-12) October 12, 1998 (age 18) 9 1   CS Lévis-Est
25 3MF Sarah Stratigakis (1999-03-07) March 7, 1999 (age 18) 2 0   Aurora United SC
3MF Rebecca Quinn (1995-08-11) August 11, 1995 (age 21) 29 3   Duke Blue Devils

6 4FW Deanne Rose (1999-03-03) March 3, 1999 (age 18) 26 6   Scarborough GS United
7 4FW Adriana Leon (1992-10-02) October 2, 1992 (age 24) 39 5   Boston Breakers
12 4FW Christine Sinclair (c) (1983-06-12) June 12, 1983 (age 33) 257 167   Portland Thorns FC
15 4FW Nichelle Prince (1995-02-19) February 19, 1995 (age 22) 27 6   Houston Dash
16 4FW Janine Beckie (1994-08-20) August 20, 1994 (age 22) 32 15   Houston Dash
23 4FW Jordyn Huitema (2001-05-08) May 8, 2001 (age 16) 2 0   Vancouver Whitecaps FC

Recent call-upsEdit

The following players were named to a squad in the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up

DF Josée Bélanger (1986-05-14) May 14, 1986 (age 31) 57 7 Retired v.   Mexico, February 4, 2017
DF Ashley Cathro 0 0   Vancouver Whitecaps FC v.   Mexico, February 4, 2017
DF Marie-Ève Nault (1982-02-16) February 16, 1982 (age 35) 71 1 Retired v.   Mexico, February 4, 2017
DF Rhian Wilkinson (1982-05-12) May 12, 1982 (age 35) 181 7 Retired v.   Mexico, February 4, 2017
DF Amandine Pierre-Louis (1995-02-18) February 18, 1995 (age 22) 0 0   West Virginia Mountaineers Conditioning and assessment camp, January 2017

MF Diana Matheson (1984-04-06) April 6, 1984 (age 33) 191 17   Seattle Reign FC v.   Mexico, February 4, 2017
MF Kaylyn Kyle (1988-10-06) October 6, 1988 (age 28) 101 6 Retired 2016 Summer Olympics ALT

FW Alex Lamontagne (1996-07-27) July 27, 1996 (age 20) 2 0   Syracuse Orange 2017 Algarve Cup
FW Melissa Tancredi (1981-12-27) December 27, 1981 (age 35) 125 27 Retired v.   Mexico, February 4, 2017
FW Valérie Sanderson (1995-03-16) March 16, 1995 (age 22) 0 0 Unattached Conditioning and assessment camp, January 2017

Notes:

  • ALT = Alternate

Player recordsEdit

Bold players are still active

Former coachesEdit

All-time record against other nationsEdit

As of April 9, 2017 [citation needed]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Canada vs. France: Olympic soccer bronze medal made out of heart". National Post. August 9, 2012. Retrieved August 20, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Canadian soccer timeline from 2001 to 2004". Canada Soccer. May 27, 2012. Retrieved October 11, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Canadian soccer timeline from 2005 to 2008". Canada Soccer. May 27, 2012. Retrieved October 11, 2016. 
  4. ^ FIFA.com. "Women’s Olympic Football Tournament, Rio 2016 - Matches - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved February 26, 2017. 
  5. ^ FIFA.com. "FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship Canada 2002 - Matches - Canada-USA - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved February 26, 2017. 
  6. ^ "Key figures from the FIFA Women’s World Cup Canada 2015". FIFA. Retrieved July 14, 2015. 
  7. ^ Larsen, Karin (June 6, 2015). "FIFA Women's World Cup brings back bittersweet memories for Canada's 1st national female soccer players". CBC. Retrieved October 11, 2016. 
  8. ^ Lisi, Clemente A. (2010). "The U.S. Women's Soccer Team: An American Success Story". Scarecrow Press. p. 131. Retrieved October 11, 2016. 
  9. ^ FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995 - Matches - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved November 7, 2016. 
  10. ^ FIFA.com. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003 - Matches - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved November 7, 2016. 
  11. ^ "Canadian women repeat as Olympic soccer bronze medallists". Rio 2016 Olympic Games. Retrieved November 7, 2016. 
  12. ^ a b "Christine Sinclair says Rio Olympics won’t be her last tournament – Sportsnet.ca". Sportsnet.ca. Retrieved November 7, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Christine Sinclair gets heartfelt praise from Canadian soccer boss". Rio 2016 Olympic Games. Retrieved November 7, 2016. 
  14. ^ "Christine Sinclair". Official Canadian Olympic Team Website | Team Canada | 2016 Olympic Games. September 19, 2011. Retrieved November 7, 2016. 
  15. ^ "Christine Sinclair headlines Canada's Olympic soccer team". Rio 2016 Olympic Games. Retrieved November 7, 2016. 
  16. ^ http://www.canadasoccer.com/roster-canada-soccer-releases-roster-for-women-s-friendlies-in-sweden-and-germany--p160691

External linksEdit

Sporting positions
Preceded by
1994 United States  
CONCACAF Champions
1998 (First title)
Succeeded by
2002 United States  
Preceded by
2006 United States  
CONCACAF Champions
2010 (Second title)
Succeeded by
2014 United States