CONCACAF Women's Championship

The CONCACAF Women's Championship, in some years called the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup or the CONCACAF Women's World Cup qualifying, is a football competition organized by CONCACAF that often serves as the qualifying competition to the Women's World Cup. In years when the tournament has been held outside the World Cup qualifying cycle, non-CONCACAF members have been invited. CONCACAF (the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football) is the governing body for football for North America, Central America and the Caribbean. The most successful country has been the United States, winning their eighth title in 2018.[2]

CONCACAF Women's Championship
Organising bodyCONCACAF
Founded1991; 29 years ago (1991)[1]
RegionNorth America, Central America and the Caribbean
Number of teams8
Current champions United States (8th title)
Most successful team(s) United States (8 titles)
Websitewww.concacaf.com/category/gold-cup
2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship

HistoryEdit

2000 Gold CupEdit

The first Women's Gold Cup Qualifying Tournament (qualifying for the Women's World Cup) was hosted by the U.S. in 2000. Six member women's national teams participated: Canada, the U.S., Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago, as well as two invited teams, Brazil and China.[3] The U.S. won. The 2002 Women's Gold Cup, held in Canada, was restricted to qualifying CONCACAF teams.

2002Edit

Played in four venues and two countries over 14 days by eight teams, the 2002 Women's Gold Cup guaranteed two World Cup slots and one playoff spot to winners. After 16 games, played as 8 doubleheaders, the U.S.A. beat Canada in overtime. Mia Hamm scored the golden goal, taking the U.S. to their second Women's Gold Cup title. The U.S. had a 9–0–1 Gold Cup record, including 48 goals for and two goals against, both scored by Charmaine Hooper of Canada.

2006Edit

The 2006 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup was held in the United States, with games being hosted at The Home Depot Center in Carson, California and Tropical Park Stadium in Miami, Florida. This 2007 World Cup qualifying tournament featured six teams in single-elimination, with the top two teams qualifying directly for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup in China. Additionally, the third-place finisher played a two-legged home-and-away playoff against Japan (the fourth-place finisher from the Asian Confederation).[4]

TournamentsEdit

CONCACAF Women's ChampionshipsEdit

Tournaments not used as Women's World Cup Qualifying highlighted in pink.

Year Host Final Third Place Match
Winner Score Runner-up 3rd Place Score 4th Place
1991
Details
  Haiti  
United States
5–0  
Canada
 
Trinidad and Tobago
4–2  
Haiti
1993
Details
  United States  
United States
Round-robin  
New Zealand
 
Canada
Round-robin  
Trinidad and Tobago
1994
Details
  Canada  
United States
Round-robin  
Canada
 
Mexico
Round-robin  
Trinidad and Tobago
1998*
Details
  Canada  
Canada
1–0  
Mexico
 
Costa Rica
4–0  
Guatemala
2000
Details
  United States  
United States
1–0  
Brazil
 
China PR
2–1  
Canada
2002
Details
  United States
  Canada
 
United States
2–1 (gg)  
Canada
 
Mexico
4–1  
Costa Rica
2006
Details
  United States  
United States
2–1 (a.e.t.)  
Canada
 
Mexico
3–0  
Jamaica
2010
Details
  Mexico  
Canada
1–0  
Mexico
 
United States
3–0  
Costa Rica
2014*
Details
  United States  
United States
6–0  
Costa Rica
 
Mexico
4–2 (a.e.t.)  
Trinidad and Tobago
2018
Details
  United States  
United States
2–0  
Canada
 
Jamaica
2–2 (a.e.t.)
(4–2 pen.)
 
Panama

*   United States did not participate, as it qualified directly for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup as the host.

*   Canada did not participate, as it qualified directly for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup as the host.

Performance by countryEdit

Team Winners Runners-up Third place Fourth place
  United States 8 (1991, 1993, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2014, 2018) 1 (2010)
  Canada 2 (1998, 2010) 5 (1991, 1994, 2002, 2006, 2018) 1 (1993) 1 (2000)
  Mexico 2 (1998, 2010) 4 (1994, 2002, 2006, 2014)
  Costa Rica 1 (2014) 1 (1998) 2 (2002, 2010)
  Brazil 1 (2000)
  New Zealand 1 (1993)
  Trinidad and Tobago 1 (1991) 3 (1993, 1994, 2014)
  Jamaica 1 (2018) 1 (2006)
  China PR 1 (2000)
  Haiti 1 (1991)
  Guatemala 1 (1998)
  Panama 1 (2018)

Teams in Italics are Guest Nations.

Participating nationsEdit

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  • GS – Group stage
  • q – Qualified to World Cup
  •     — Hosts
Team  
1991
 
1993
 
1994
 
1998
 
2000
 
 
2002
 
2006
 
2010
 
2014
 
2018
Total
  Canada 2nd 3rd 2nd 1st 4th 2nd 2nd 1st 2nd 9
  Costa Rica GS 3rd GS 4th 4th 2nd GS 7
  Cuba GS 1
  Guatemala 4th GS GS GS 4
  Guyana GS 1
  Haiti 4th GS GS GS GS 5
  Jamaica GS 5th GS 4th GS 3rd 6
  Martinique GS GS GS 3
  Mexico GS 3rd 2nd GS 3rd 3rd 2nd 3rd GS 9
  Panama GS GS 4th 3
  Puerto Rico GS 1
  Trinidad and Tobago 3rd 4th 4th GS GS GS GS GS 4th GS 10
  United States 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 3rd 1st 1st 9
Non-CONCACAF Invitees
  Brazil 2nd 1
  China PR 3rd 1
  New Zealand 2nd 1
Total 8 4 5 8 8 8 6 8 8 8

General statisticsEdit

As of the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship. Teams in bold are participating in the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship. Teams in italics are non-CONCACAF invitees.

Rank Team Part Pld W D L GF GA Dif Pts
1   United States 9 39 37 1 1 199 6 +193 112
2   Canada 9 39 29 1 9 179 32 +147 88
3   Mexico 9 36 18 2 16 94 80 +14 56
4   Trinidad and Tobago 10 37 13 2 22 44 127 −83 41
5   Costa Rica 7 29 13 1 15 46 74 −28 40
6   Haiti 5 17 5 0 12 15 59 −44 15
7   China PR 1 5 4 0 1 24 6 +18 12
8   Brazil 1 5 3 1 1 22 3 +19 10
9   Jamaica 6 20 4 1 14 26 69 −43 13
10   Guatemala 4 14 2 0 12 11 68 −57 6
11   New Zealand 1 3 1 1 1 7 3 +4 4
12   Panama 3 9 3 1 5 12 32 −20 10
13   Martinique 3 9 0 2 7 12 59 −47 2
14   Guyana 1 3 0 0 3 3 19 −16 0
15   Cuba 1 3 0 0 3 0 29 –29 0
16   Puerto Rico 1 3 0 0 3 0 38 −38 0

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup – Technical Report" (PDF). CONCACAF. 12 November 2007. p. 4. Archived from the original (pdf) on 29 November 2016. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  2. ^ "Wambach fires for four, U.S. claims CWC title". concacaf.com. Archived from the original on 2014-10-29. Retrieved 2014-10-26.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2004-11-16. Retrieved 2006-02-21.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "The Official Site of U.S. Soccer – Women's National Team". Archived from the original on 2006-11-13. Retrieved 2006-10-05.

External linksEdit