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Introduction


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Canada /ˈkænədə/ is a North American country consisting of ten provinces and three territories. Located in the northern part of the continent, it extends from the Atlantic Ocean in the east to the Pacific Ocean in the west and northward into the Arctic Ocean. It is the world's second largest country by total area. Canada's common border with the United States to the south and northwest is the longest in the world.

The land that is now Canada was inhabited for millennia by various groups of Aboriginal peoples. Beginning in the late 15th century, British and French expeditions explored, and later settled, along the Atlantic coast. France ceded nearly all of its colonies in North America in 1763 after the Seven Years' War. In 1867, with the union of three British North American colonies through Confederation, Canada was formed as a federal dominion of four provinces. This began an accretion of provinces and territories and a process of increasing autonomy from the United Kingdom. This widening autonomy was highlighted by the Statute of Westminster of 1931 and culminated in the Canada Act of 1982, which severed the vestiges of legal dependence on the British parliament.

Canada is a federation that is governed as a parliamentary democracy and a constitutional monarchy with Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state. It is a bilingual nation with both English and French as official languages at the federal level. One of the world's highly developed countries, Canada has a diversified economy that is reliant upon its abundant natural resources and upon trade—particularly with the United States, with which Canada has had a long and complex relationship. It is a member of the G7, G-20, NATO, OECD, WTO, Commonwealth, Francophonie, OAS, APEC, and UN.

Coat of Arms of Canada (1957).jpg More about...Canada, its history and inhabitants

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Looking south into downtown Dawson Creek, with the Mile "0" post.
The City of Dawson Creek is a small city in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. The municipality of 20.66 square kilometres (7.98 sq mi) had a population of 11,811 in 2007. Dawson Creek derives its name from the creek of the same name that runs through the community. The creek was named after George Mercer Dawson by a member of his land survey team when they passed through the area in August 1879. Once a small farming community, Dawson Creek became a regional centre when the western terminus of the Northern Alberta Railways was extended there in 1932. The community grew rapidly in 1942 as the US Army used the rail terminus as a transshipment point during construction of the Alaska Highway. In the 1950s, the city was connected to the interior of British Columbia via a highway and railway through the Rocky Mountains. Since the 1960s, growth has slowed.

Dawson Creek is located in the dry and windy prairie land of the Peace River Country. As the seat of the Peace River Regional District and a service centre for the rural areas south of the Peace River, the city has been called the "Capital of the Peace". It is also known as the "Mile 0 City", referring to its location at the southern end of the Alaska Highway. The community is home to a heritage interpretation village, an art gallery, and a museum. Annual events include a fall fair and a spring rodeo.

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Martin Brodeur
Martin Brodeur (born May 6, 1972) is a professional ice hockey goaltender who has played his entire National Hockey League career with the New Jersey Devils. In his 13-year tenure, he has led the team to three Stanley Cup championships and has taken them to the playoffs all but once. In addition to holding over thirty Devils franchise records, he is on pace to surpass Patrick Roy's career records for wins, games played and minutes played, as well as Terry Sawchuk's record for career shutouts, and Patrick Roy's record for career playoff shutouts.

Brodeur has been among the NHL's most consistent goaltenders over the past decade, winning at least 35 games each of the last ten seasons as well as being the only goalie in NHL history with six 40-win seasons. He is a three-time Vezina Trophy winner, a four-time Jennings Trophy winner, a nine-time NHL All Star, and one of only two NHL goaltenders to have scored goals in the regular season and the playoffs. In the 2006-07 NHL season, Brodeur surpassed Sawchuk and still-active Ed Belfour on the all-time wins list and Glenn Hall on the all-time shutouts list to rank 2nd and 3rd in those categories, respectively. He also passed Bernie Parent's record of 47 single-season wins with his 48th win on April 5, 2007.

In the news

12 November 2018 – Killing of Jamal Khashoggi, Foreign relations of Saudi Arabia
Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau confirms that Canadian intelligence officials have listened to the recording provided by Turkey of the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, though he himself had not heard it. (CTV News)
12 November 2018 – Antisemitism in Canada, History of the Jews in Toronto
Toronto police investigates a hate crime against four Jewish teens. 1 person is arrested and 9 other teenagers are being sought. (Huffington Post Canada) (CBC CA)
7 November 2018 – Premiership of Justin Trudeau, History of the Jews in Canada
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issues an apology for the country's role in turning away the MS St. Louis, a ship carrying over 900 Jewish refugees fleeing persecution in Nazi Germany. (BBC) (Washington Post)
30 October 2018 –
John Letts, the father of the alleged British-Canadian Islamic State fighter Jack Letts who is being held by Kurdish forces in Syria, calls for the Canadian government to help secure his release. (BBC), (CTV News)

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Epigaea repens


Epigaea repens (Mayflower or Trailing Arbutus) is a low, spreading shrub in the Ericaceae family. Epigaea repens is the floral emblem of both Nova Scotia and Massachusetts...

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