Wake Forest Demon Deacons women's soccer

The Wake Forest University Demon Deacons women's soccer team is an amateur, NCAA Division I college soccer team composed of students attending Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. They achieved their best NCAA Tournament result in 2011, when they reached the College Cup. Like all sports teams from Wake Forest, women's soccer competes in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The Deacons play their home matches at Spry Stadium on the campus of Wake Forest.

Wake Forest Demon Deacons
Wake Forest University Athletic logo.svg
Founded1994
UniversityWake Forest University
Head coachTony da Luz (17th season)
ConferenceACC
LocationWinston-Salem, NC
StadiumSpry Stadium
(Capacity: 3,000)
NicknameDeacs
ColorsOld Gold and Black[1]
         
NCAA Tournament College Cup
2011
NCAA Tournament Quarterfinals
2009, 2011
NCAA Tournament Round of 16
1996, 1999, 2009, 2011, 2013
NCAA Tournament Round of 32
1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2017
NCAA Tournament appearances
1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2017
Conference Tournament championships
2010

HistoryEdit

1990sEdit

Wake Forest fielded its first team in 1994, under the coaching of Chris Turner. The Deacons went 8–9–0 in their first season. However, all of those 8 wins came outside the Atlantic Coast Conference. Despite the team's 0–6 conference record, they still qualified for the ACC Women's Soccer Tournament, where they would lose in the first round. In 1995, the team won their first ACC game, and finished with a .500 record of 9–9–3. Continuing to build, they won 2 conference games and their first ACC tournament game in 1996. Their 14–8 overall record would be the program's first winning record. The team qualified for its first NCAA Tournament. This would start a run of 18 straight NCAA qualifications for the Demon Deacons. The team couldn't quite reach the same heights in 1997, finishing 11–8–2 and losing in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. After the season Chris Turner would leave as head coach and would be replaced by Tony da Luz.[2] In his first season, Da Luz would lead the Demon Deacons to their first ever winning conference season. The team also qualified for the NCAA Tournament and finished the season nationally ranked. In 1999, a trip to the third round of the NCAA Tournament earned the team its first top 15 ranking at the end of the season. The Demon Deacons closed the season with a 16–6–1 record. A program record for wins in a season that stood until 2011. The team also finished as runners up in the ACC Tournament.

2000sEdit

The decade began with the Demon Deacon's third straight 4–3 ACC record. However, this year it was good enough to finish for a tie for second place in the standings. However, early exits in both the ACC and NCAA tournament saw the team finish with a final ranking of 23rd nationally. This was the third straight year the team finished nationally ranked. In 2001, the team ended a string of five straight winning seasons when they finished the season 9–9–2 overall. They returned to their winning ways in 2002, but regressed in the ACC, finishing 2–4–1 and tied for 7th place in the standings. The regression continued in 2003 when the team only won 1 game in the ACC. However, the team continued to qualify for the NCAA tournament in these years. 2004 was a bit of a rebound year, as the team finished 4–4–1 in the ACC and 10–7 overall, for the second consecutive year. In 2006, the Demon Deacons had their first ACC winning season since 2001, finishing 6–4–0 and tied a program record with 16 overall wins. The team finished 19th in the final national rankings, their first end of season ranking since 2000. The Demon Deacons achieved another final national ranking in 2007 after finishing 6–2–2 in the ACC and reaching the second round of the NCAA Tournament. Their ranking run would continue in 2008 when the team finished 25th overall. 2009 would provide a breakthrough in the NCAA tournament, the Demon Deacons made the Quarterfinals. This would be good enough to reach 8th in the final rankings, a program best at the time.

2010sEdit

The decade would start off with a program first in 2010. This year was the first time that Wake Forest won the ACC Tournament. They managed to win the tournament despite finishing 5th in the conference regular season. A second round appearance in the NCAA tournament was good enough to extend the streak of being ranked in the final rankings. 2011 was the best season in team history. The team was runner up in the ACC Tournament and finished with a program best 18 overall wins. The Demon Deacons also had their best NCAA Tournament finish in history. They qualified for the college cup as a number 1 seed in the tournament and finished the season ranked 4th, a program best. 2012 couldn't quite see the same success. However, the team did improve on its conference record. 2013 ended seven year run of being ranked in the final rankings, as a 12–7–2 record and NCAA Sweet 16 appearance was not good enough to crack the final top 25. 2014 was the Demon Deacons first overall losing record since 1994, the year the program began. They would also miss out on the NCAA tournament for the first time since 1996. Things would get worse in 2015 when the team lost 12 games overall and finished tied for last in the ACC. In 2016, the team mustered an overall winning record, but could not improve on a 2–8 conference record. The team returned to the ACC tournament in 2017 for the first time in 4 seasons and ended a three year skid of not qualifying for the NCAA tournament. 2018 finished positively when the team qualified for the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament and finished the season ranked 25th overall.

SeasonsEdit

Season Conference Record[3] Conference
Tourn. Pos.
Overall Record Honors Top points[4] Top scorer[5]
Conference Pld. W L D Pos. Pld. W L D Natl.
Rank
1994 ACC 6 0 6 0 7th QF 17 8 9 0 Cheryl Zimmerman 15 Cheryl Zimmerman 7
1995 ACC 7 1 6 0 7th QF 21 9 9 3 Julie Scott 21 Julie Scott 8
1996 ACC 7 2 5 0 t-6th SF 22 14 8 0 20 NCAA 2nd Round Liz Burnette 27 Liz Burnette 12
1997 ACC 7 1 6 0 7th QF 21 11 8 2 NCAA 1st Round Stefanie Mathews 22 Stefanie Mathews 8
1998 ACC 7 4 3 0 4th SF 21 13 7 1 24 NCAA 1st Round Anne Shropshire 32 Anne Shropshire 11
1999 ACC 7 4 3 0 t-3rd F 23 16 6 1 12 NCAA 3rd Round Joline Charlton 27 Joline Charlton 10
2000 ACC 7 4 3 0 t-2nd QF 21 11 8 2 23 NCAA 2nd Round Emily Taggart 24 Emily Taggart 9
2001 ACC 7 3 4 0 t-5th SF 20 9 9 2 NCAA 1st Round Stacy Roeck 20 Stacy Roeck 9
2002 ACC 7 2 4 1 t-7th QF 22 13 8 1 NCAA 2nd Round Katherine Winstead 24 Sarah Kozey/Katherine Winstead 9
2003 ACC 7 1 4 2 7th QF 20 10 7 3 NCAA 1st Round Sarah Kozey/Elizabeth Remy 17 Sarah Kozey/Elizabeth Remy 6
2004 ACC 9 4 4 1 t-5th QF 19 10 7 2 NCAA 1st Round Sarah Kozey 28 Sarah Kozey 12
2005 ACC 10 4 6 0 7th QF 19 9 9 1 NCAA 1st Round Elizabeth Remy 25 Sarah Kozey 8
2006 ACC 10 6 4 0 3rd SF 23 16 6 1 19 NCAA 2nd Round Elizabeth Remy 23 Elizabeth Remy 9
2007 ACC 10 6 2 2 t-2nd SF 23 13 7 3 20 NCAA 2nd Round Jill Hutchinson 22 Jill Hutchinson 10
2008 ACC 10 5 5 0 6th QF 21 13 8 0 25 NCAA 2nd Round Jill Hutchinson 27 Jill Hutchinson 10
2009 ACC 10 5 3 2 5th QF 24 16 6 2 8 NCAA Quarterfinalist Kaley Fountain/Jill Hutchinson 32 Jill Hutchinson 14
2010 ACC 10 5 4 1 5th W 24 13 8 3 25 NCAA 2nd Round Katie Stengel 37 Katie Stengel 16
2011 ACC 10 5 2 3 t-4th F 26 18 4 4 4 NCAA Semifinalist Katie Stengel 46 Katie Stengel 19
2012 ACC 10 6 3 1 t-2nd SF 23 14 6 3 15 NCAA 2nd Round Katie Stengel 22 Katie Stengel 9
2013 ACC 13 5 6 2 9th 21 12 7 2 NCAA 3rd Round Riley Ridgik 26 Riley Ridgik 11
2014 ACC 10 3 5 2 t-8th 17 5 9 3 Riley Ridgik 12 Riley Ridgik 5
2015 ACC 10 2 8 0 t-12th 19 5 12 2 Sarah Medina 11 Sarah Medina 4
2016 ACC 10 2 8 0 11th 18 10 8 0 Maddie Huster 14 Peyton Perea 6
2017 ACC 10 5 3 2 t-5th QF 22 11 7 4 NCAA 2nd Round Bayley Feist 18 Bayley Feist 8
2018 ACC 10 4 6 0 t-9th 20 9 9 2 25 NCAA 3rd Round Bayley Feist 18 Bayley Feist 7
2019 ACC 10 1 6 3 12th 18 6 8 4 Hudla Arnasdottir 18 Hudla Arnasdottir 8
Totals:
22 Seasons
1 Conference 231 90 119 21 1 ACCT title 544 294 200 51 Katie Stengel 125 Katie Stengel 50

PersonnelEdit

2019 RosterEdit

Source:[6]Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
0   GK Mac Carmichael
1   GK Kaitlyn Parks
2   FW Hayley Younginer
3   MF Giovanna DeMarco
4   DF Vicky Krug
5   FW Ashley Frank
6   MF Madeline Allburn
7   FW Abby McNamara
8   FW Haley Jordahl
9   MF Grace Jale
10   FW Estelle Laurier
16   GK Mia Raben
17   DF Madisyn Opstal
18   FW Cameron Rawlings
No. Position Player
19   MF Lyndon Wood
20   FW Shayla Smart
21   FW Raynne Brown
22   GK Meghan Kennedy
23   MF Lauren Tangney
26   DF Mia Albery
28   FW Sofia Rossi
31   MF Brooke Smith
32   MF Aanchal Jain
33   FW Hannah Betfort
34   DF Lily Schneider
88   FW Hulda Arnarsdottir
99   DF Madison Hammond

Team ManagementEdit

Position Staff
Head Coach Tony Da Luz
Associate Head Coach Philip Poole
Assistant Coach Courtney Owen
Volunteer Assistant Coach Marnie Merritt

Source:[7]

AwardsEdit

ACC Coach of the Year:

  • Tony da Luz - 1998

ACC Offensive Player of the Year:

ACC Freshman of the Year:

NSCAA All-AmericansEdit

Year Player(s)
2009 Kaley Fountain**
2010 Katie Stengel*
2011 Aubrey Bledsoe*, Katie Stengel
2012 Katie Stengel*
  • (*) Denotes 2nd Team All-American
  • (**) Denotes 3rd Team All-American

All-ACC PlayersEdit

  • The players are all first team All-ACC, unless otherwise noted
Year Player(s)
1997 Stefanie Mathews*
1998 Stefanie Mathews*, Emily Taggart*
1999 Joline Charlton*, Erin Regan, Stacy Roeck*, Emily Taggart
2000 Joline Charlton, Stacy Roeck*, Emily Taggart
2001 Sarah Kate Noftsinger*, Stacy Roeck, Emily Taggart
2002 A.B. Robbins*, Katherine Winstead*
2003 Melanie Schneider*, Alena Thom*
2004 Alli Hunt*, Sarah Kozey*
2005 Sarah Kozey*, Melanie Schneider*
2006 Kristina Hanley*, Elizabeth Remy
2007 Kaley Fountain*, Jill Hutchinson, Allie Sadow*, Amy Smerdzinski*
2008 Kaley Fountain*, Amy Smerdzinski*
2009 Kaley Fountain, Jill Hutchinson
2010 Katie Stengel
2011 Aubrey Bledsoe, Caralee Keppler*, Katie Stengel
2012 Aubrey Bledsoe*, Katie Stengel
2013 Aubrey Bledsoe, Riley Ridgik*, Katie Stengel*
2016 Sarah Teegarden*
2017 Lindsay Preston*, Maddie Huster*, Bayley Feist**, Vicky Krug^
2018 Bayley Feist*, Peyton Perea**, Giovanna Demarco^
  • (*) Denotes 2nd Team All-ACC
  • (**) Denotes 3rd Team All-ACC
  • (^) Denotes All-Freshman ACC Team

Players in the WPS DraftEdit

Year Player Round # Pick # Overall # Team
2010 Kaley Fountain 2nd 9 20 FC Gold Pride
2010 Jill Hutchinson 4th 1 30 Atlanta Beat
2010 Caitlin Farrell 7th 2 58 Philadelphia Independence
2011 Caitlin Farrell 2nd 3 11 Philadelphia Independence
2011 Bianca D'Agostino 3rd 6 18 Philadelphia Independence

Players in the NWSL DraftEdit

Year Player Round # Pick # Overall # Team
2013 Kristen Meier 3rd 7 23 Seattle Reign FC
Jackie Logue 4th 6 30 Western New York Flash
2018 Ally Haran 3rd 5 25 Seattle Reign FC
Maddie Huster 3rd 6 26 Washington Spirit
2019 Bayley Feist 2nd 8 17 Washington Spirit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Logos & Branding – Wake Forest University". November 24, 2019. Retrieved December 20, 2019.
  2. ^ "Tony Da Luz Bio". godeacs.com. Wake Forest University Athletics. Retrieved May 28, 2019.
  3. ^ "Women's Soccer Year-by-Year Results". godeacs.com. Wake Forest University Athletics. Retrieved May 23, 2019.
  4. ^ In NCAA scoring, goals count as 2 points while assists count as one point.
  5. ^ Goals in all competitions (regular season, Conference, and NCAA Tournament) are counted.
  6. ^ "2019 Women's Soccer Roster". wakeforestsports.com. Wake Forest University Athletics. Retrieved August 15, 2019.
  7. ^ "Women's Soccer Coaching Staff". godeacs.com. Wake Forest Athletics. Retrieved August 15, 2019.

External linksEdit