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2010 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA)

The European zone of qualification for the 2010 FIFA World Cup saw 53 teams competing for 13 places at the finals. The qualification process started on 20 August 2008, nearly two months after the end of UEFA Euro 2008, and ended on 18 November 2009. The qualification process saw the first competitive matches of Montenegro.

2010 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA)
Tournament details
Dates20 August 2008 – 18 November 2009
Teams53 (from 1 confederation)
Tournament statistics
Matches played268
Goals scored725 (2.71 per match)
Attendance6,034,605 (22,517 per match)
Top scorer(s)Greece Theofanis Gekas (10 goals)
2006
2014

Denmark, England, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Serbia, Slovakia, Spain, and Switzerland qualified in the first round by winning their groups. France, Greece, Portugal, and Slovenia qualified via the second round play-offs.

FormatEdit

Teams were drawn into eight groups of six teams and one group of five teams. The nine group winners qualified directly, while the best eight second-placed teams contested home and away play off matches for the remaining four places. In determining the best eight second placed teams, the results against teams finishing last in the six team groups were not counted for consistency between the five and six team groups.[1]

SeedingEdit

After initially proposing to use a similar system to recent World Cup and European Championship qualification (based on results across the previous two European qualification cycles), the UEFA Executive Committee decided on 27 September 2007 at its meeting in Istanbul that seeding for the qualifiers would be based on FIFA World Rankings, in accordance with the FIFA World Cup regulations (which note that where teams are ranked on "performance" criteria, the FIFA World Rankings must be used).[2]

The FIFA World Ranking used for seeding was the most recent at the time of the preliminary draw, namely the November 2007 edition. Initially scheduled for 21 November, the release date of the ranking was moved to 23 November to include the final match days of Euro 2008 qualification.[3]

The countries that eventually qualified for the final tournament are emboldened in the table below.

Pot A Pot B Pot C Pot D Pot E Pot F

  Italy
  Spain
  Germany
  Czech Republic
  France
  Portugal
  Netherlands
  Croatia
  Greece

  England
  Romania
  Scotland
  Turkey
  Bulgaria
  Russia
  Poland
  Sweden
  Israel

  Norway
  Ukraine
  Serbia
  Denmark
  Northern Ireland
  Republic of Ireland
  Finland
   Switzerland
  Belgium

  Slovakia
  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Hungary
  Moldova
  Wales
  Macedonia
  Belarus
  Lithuania
  Cyprus

  Georgia
  Albania
  Slovenia
  Latvia
  Iceland
  Armenia
  Austria
  Kazakhstan
  Azerbaijan

  Liechtenstein
  Estonia
  Malta
  Luxembourg
  Montenegro
  Andorra
  Faroe Islands
  San Marino

DrawEdit

The draw for the group stage took place in Durban, South Africa on 25 November 2007.[4] During the draw, teams were drawn from the six pots A to F (see above) into the nine groups below, starting with pot F, which filled position 6 in the groups, then continued with pot E filling position 5, pot D in position 4 and so on.[5]

SummaryEdit

Table - top row: group winners, second row: group runners-up, third row: others. The winner of each group qualified for the 2010 FIFA World Cup together with winners of play-off. The play-offs took place between the eight best runners-up among all nine groups. The ninth group runner-up did not qualify.

  Group winners qualified directly for the 2010 FIFA World Cup
  Other teams were eliminated after the first round
Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4 Group 5 Group 6 Group 7 Group 8 Group 9
 
Denmark
 
Switzerland
 
Slovakia
 
Germany
 
Spain
 
England
 
Serbia
 
Italy
 
Netherlands
 
Portugal
 
Greece
 
Slovenia
 
Russia
 
Bosnia and Herzegovina
 
Ukraine
 
France
 
Republic of Ireland
 
Norway
 
Sweden
 
Hungary
 
Albania
 
Malta
 
Latvia
 
Israel
 
Luxembourg
 
Moldova
 
Czech Republic
 
Northern Ireland
 
Poland
 
San Marino
 
Finland
 
Wales
 
Azerbaijan
 
Liechtenstein
 
Turkey
 
Belgium
 
Estonia
 
Armenia
 
Croatia
 
Belarus
 
Kazakhstan
 
Andorra
 
Austria
 
Lithuania
 
Romania
 
Faroe Islands
 
Bulgaria
 
Cyprus
 
Montenegro
 
Georgia
 
Scotland
 
Macedonia
 
Iceland

First roundEdit

Group 1Edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts            
  Denmark 10 6 3 1 16 5 +11 21 1–1 1–0 0–1 3–0 3–0
  Portugal 10 5 4 1 17 5 +12 19 2–3 0–0 3–0 0–0 4–0
  Sweden 10 5 3 2 13 5 +8 18 0–1 0–0 2–1 4–1 4–0
  Hungary 10 5 1 4 10 8 +2 16 0–0 0–1 1–2 2–0 3–0
  Albania 10 1 4 5 6 13 −7 7 1–1 1–2 0–0 0–1 3–0
  Malta 10 0 1 9 0 26 −26 1 0–3 0–4 0–1 0–1 0–0

Group 2Edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts            
   Switzerland 10 6 3 1 18 8 +10 21 2–0 2–1 0–0 1–2 2–0
  Greece 10 6 2 2 20 10 +10 20 1–2 5–2 2–1 2–1 3–0
  Latvia 10 5 2 3 18 15 +3 17 2–2 0–2 1–1 2–0 3–2
  Israel 10 4 4 2 20 10 +10 16 2–2 1–1 0–1 7–0 3–1
  Luxembourg 10 1 2 7 4 25 −21 5 0–3 0–3 0–4 1–3 0–0
  Moldova 10 0 3 7 6 18 −12 3 0–2 1–1 1–2 1–2 0–0

Group 3Edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts            
  Slovakia 10 7 1 2 22 10 +12 22 0–2 2–2 2–1 2–1 7–0
  Slovenia 10 6 2 2 18 4 +14 20 2–1 0–0 2–0 3–0 5–0
  Czech Republic 10 4 4 2 17 6 +11 16 1–2 1–0 0–0 2–0 7–0
  Northern Ireland 10 4 3 3 13 9 +4 15 0–2 1–0 0–0 3–2 4–0
  Poland 10 3 2 5 19 14 +5 11 0–1 1–1 2–1 1–1 10–0
  San Marino 10 0 0 10 1 47 −46 0 1–3 0–3 0–3 0–3 0–2

Group 4Edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts            
  Germany 10 8 2 0 26 5 +21 26 2–1 1–1 1–0 4–0 4–0
  Russia 10 7 1 2 19 6 +13 22 0–1 3–0 2–1 2–0 3–0
  Finland 10 5 3 2 14 14 0 18 3–3 0–3 2–1 1–0 2–1
  Wales 10 4 0 6 9 12 −3 12 0–2 1–3 0–2 1–0 2–0
  Azerbaijan 10 1 2 7 4 14 −10 5 0–2 1–1 1–2 0–1 0–0
  Liechtenstein 10 0 2 8 2 23 −21 2 0–6 0–1 1–1 0–2 0–2

Group 5Edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts            
  Spain 10 10 0 0 28 5 +23 30 1–0 1–0 5–0 3–0 4–0
  Bosnia and Herzegovina 10 6 1 3 25 13 +12 19 2–5 1–1 2–1 7–0 4–1
  Turkey 10 4 3 3 13 10 +3 15 1–2 2–1 1–1 4–2 2–0
  Belgium 10 3 1 6 13 20 −7 10 1–2 2–4 2–0 3–2 2–0
  Estonia 10 2 2 6 9 24 −15 8 0–3 0–2 0–0 2–0 1–0
  Armenia 10 1 1 8 6 22 −16 4 1–2 0–2 0–2 2–1 2–2

Group 6Edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts            
  England 10 9 0 1 34 6 +28 27 2–1 5–1 3–0 5–1 6–0
  Ukraine 10 6 3 1 21 6 +15 21 1–0 0–0 1–0 2–1 5–0
  Croatia 10 6 2 2 19 13 +6 20 1–4 2–2 1–0 3–0 4–0
  Belarus 10 4 1 5 19 14 +5 13 1–3 0–0 1–3 4–0 5–1
  Kazakhstan 10 2 0 8 11 29 −18 6 0–4 1–3 1–2 1–5 3–0
  Andorra 10 0 0 10 3 39 −36 0 0–2 0–6 0–2 1–3 1–3

Group 7Edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts            
  Serbia 10 7 1 2 22 8 +14 22 1–1 1–0 3–0 5–0 2–0
  France 10 6 3 1 18 9 +9 21 2–1 3–1 1–0 1–1 5–0
  Austria 10 4 2 4 14 15 −1 14 1–3 3–1 2–1 2–1 3–1
  Lithuania 10 4 0 6 10 11 −1 12 2–1 0–1 2–0 0–1 1–0
  Romania 10 3 3 4 12 18 −6 12 2–3 2–2 1–1 0–3 3–1
  Faroe Islands 10 1 1 8 5 20 −15 4 0–2 0–1 1–1 2–1 0–1

Group 8Edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts            
  Italy 10 7 3 0 18 7 +11 24 1–1 2–0 3–2 2–1 2–0
  Republic of Ireland 10 4 6 0 12 8 +4 18 2–2 1–1 1–0 0–0 2–1
  Bulgaria 10 3 5 2 17 13 +4 14 0–0 1–1 2–0 4–1 6–2
  Cyprus 10 2 3 5 14 16 −2 9 1–2 1–2 4–1 2–2 2–1
  Montenegro 10 1 6 3 9 14 −5 9 0–2 0–0 2–2 1–1 2–1
  Georgia 10 0 3 7 7 19 −12 3 0–2 1–2 0–0 1–1 0–0

Group 9Edit

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts          
  Netherlands 8 8 0 0 17 2 +15 24 2–0 3–0 4–0 2–0
  Norway 8 2 4 2 9 7 +2 10 0–1 4–0 2–1 2–2
  Scotland 8 3 1 4 6 11 −5 10 0–1 0–0 2–0 2–1
  Macedonia 8 2 1 5 5 11 −6 7 1–2 0–0 1–0 2–0
  Iceland 8 1 2 5 7 13 −6 5 1–2 1–1 1–2 1–0

Ranking of second placed teamsEdit

Because one group had one team fewer than the others, matches against the sixth placed team in each group were not included in this ranking. As a result, eight matches played by each team counted for the purposes of the second placed table.

Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
4   Russia (A) 8 5 1 2 15 6 +9 16
2   Greece (A) 8 5 1 2 16 9 +7 16
6   Ukraine (A) 8 4 3 1 10 6 +4 15
7   France (A) 8 4 3 1 12 9 +3 15
3   Slovenia (A) 8 4 2 2 10 4 +6 14
5   Bosnia and Herzegovina (A) 8 4 1 3 19 12 +7 13
1   Portugal (A) 8 3 4 1 9 5 +4 13
8   Republic of Ireland (A) 8 2 6 0 8 6 +2 12
9   Norway 8 2 4 2 9 7 +2 10
Source:[citation needed]
Rules for classification: 1. Total points, 2. Goal difference, 3. Goals scored, 4. Goals scored away from home, 5. Disciplinary record (yellow card, –1 point; two yellow cards in the same match, –3 points; red card, –3 points; yellow card followed by a direct red card in the same match, –4 points), 6. Drawing of lots[6]
(A) Advanced to the play-offs.

Second roundEdit

The UEFA second round (often referred to as the play off stage) was contested by the best eight runners up from the nine first round groups. The winners of each of four home and away ties joined the group winners in the World Cup finals in South Africa. Norway, with 10 points, was ranked 9th so failed to qualify for the second round.

Seeding and drawEdit

The eight teams were seeded according to the FIFA World Rankings released on 16 October (shown in parentheses in the table below). The draw for the ties was held in Zürich on 19 October, with the top four teams seeded into one pot and the bottom four teams seeded into a second. A separate draw decided the host of the first leg.[7]

Pot 1 Pot 2

  France (9)
  Portugal (10)
  Russia (12)
  Greece (16)

  Ukraine (22)
  Republic of Ireland (34)
  Bosnia and Herzegovina (42)
  Slovenia (49)

MatchesEdit

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Republic of Ireland   1–2   France 0–1 1–1 (aet)
Portugal   2–0   Bosnia and Herzegovina 1–0 1–0
Greece   1–0   Ukraine 0–0 1–0
Russia   2–2 (a)   Slovenia 2–1 0–1

Qualified teamsEdit

The following 13 teams from UEFA qualified for the final tournament.

Team Qualified as Qualified on Previous appearances in FIFA World Cup1
  Denmark Group 1 winners 10 October 2009 3 (1986, 1998, 2002)
   Switzerland Group 2 winners 14 October 2009 8 (1934, 1938, 1950, 1954, 1962, 1966, 1994, 2006)
  Slovakia Group 3 winners 14 October 2009 0 (debut)
  Germany Group 4 winners 10 October 2009 16 (1934, 1938, 19542, 19582, 19622, 19662, 19702, 19742, 19782, 19822, 19862, 19902, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006)
  Spain Group 5 winners 9 September 2009 12 (1934, 1950, 1962, 1966, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006)
  England Group 6 winners 9 September 2009 12 (1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998, 2002, 2006)
  Serbia Group 7 winners 10 October 2009 10 (19303, 19503, 19543, 19583, 19623, 19743, 19823, 19903, 19983, 20063)
  Italy Group 8 winners 10 October 2009 16 (1934, 1938, 1950, 1954, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006)
  Netherlands Group 9 winners 6 June 2009 8 (1934, 1938, 1974, 1978, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2006)
  Greece Second round (play-off) winners 18 November 2009 1 (1994)
  Slovenia Second round (play-off) winners 18 November 2009 1 (2002)
  Portugal Second round (play-off) winners 18 November 2009 4 (1966, 1986, 2002, 2006)
  France Second round (play-off) winners 18 November 2009 12 (1930, 1934, 1938, 1954, 1958, 1966, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1998, 2002, 2006)
1 Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.
2 Competed as West Germany. A separate team for East Germany also participated in qualifications during this time, having only competed in 1974.
3 From 1930 to 2006, Serbia competed as Yugoslavia and Serbia and Montenegro.

GoalscorersEdit

There were 725 goals scored over 268 games by 399 different players, for an average of 2.71 goals per game. England were the highest scorers in the European section with 34 goals. Malta did not score any goals, but did score two own goals. The top scorer was Theofanis Gekas of Greece, who scored ten goals.

Note: Goals scored in the play-offs are included.

10 goals
9 goals
7 goals
6 goals
5 goals
4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
1 own goal
2 own goals

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "EXCO unveils World Cup programme". UEFA.com. Geneva: Union of European Football Associations. 25 June 2007. Archived from the original on 16 March 2009. Retrieved 21 June 2009.
  2. ^ "All clear for December EURO draw". UEFA.com. Geneva: Union of European Football Associations. 27 September 2007. Archived from the original on 3 February 2008. Retrieved 21 June 2009.
  3. ^ "Next FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking on Friday 23 November 2007". FIFA.com. Zurich: Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 12 November 2007. Retrieved 21 June 2009.
  4. ^ "Preliminary draw for the 2010 World Cup". FIFA.com. Zurich: Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Archived from the original on 9 June 2008. Retrieved 21 June 2009.
  5. ^ "Preliminary Draw Information" (PDF). FIFA.com. Zurich: Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 22 November 2007. Retrieved 21 June 2009.
  6. ^ "Determining Europe's runners-up". FIFA.com. Zurich: Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 16 October 2008. Retrieved 21 June 2009.
  7. ^ "Key Decisions Reached in Rio". FIFA.com. Rio de Janeiro: Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 29 September 2009. Archived from the original on 3 October 2009. Retrieved 29 September 2009.

External linksEdit