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The 1180s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1180, and ended on December 31, 1189.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

EventsEdit

1180

By areaEdit

AmericaEdit
AsiaEdit
=Japan=
=Near East=
EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

CultureEdit
DemographyEdit

1181Edit

AsiaEdit

JapanEdit
  • The Yowa era, marked by famine, begins in Japan.
Southeast AsiaEdit

EuropeEdit

  • After a series of defeats, the Almohad navy, under the admiral Ahmad al-Siqilli, crushes the Portuguese fleet and reasserts its control over the Atlantic Ocean.[1]
  • The word Albigensians is first used by chronicler Geoffroy du Breuil of Vigeois, to describe the inhabitants of Albi, France.
  • Philip Augustus annuls all loans made by Jews to Christians, and takes a percentage for himself. A year later, he confiscates all Jewish property and expels the Jews from Paris.[3]

By topicEdit

ScienceEdit
  • Chinese and Japanese astronomers observe what has since come to be understood as supernova SN 1181. One of only eight supernovae in the Milky Way observed in recorded history, it appears in the constellation Cassiopeia, and is visible in the night sky for about 185 days. The radio source 3C58 is thought to be the remnant from this event.
  • Guilhem VIII, lord of Montpellier in France, frees the teaching of medicine from any monopoly. (January[4]).
ReligionEdit

1182Edit

By areaEdit

AsiaEdit
=Japan=
  • The Yowa era, marked by famine, ends in Japan.
=Near East=
=India=
  • Battle of Palnadu: The Kalachuri civil war ends in victory for the Palanati Kalachuris of India, and their leader, Nalagama Raju.
=Mongolia=
  • Genghis Khan is captured, and carried in a cage to a rival's camp.
EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1183Edit


By areaEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
AsiaEdit
=Japan=
=Near East=

1184Edit

By areaEdit

AfricaEdit
  • Yaqub al-Mansur becomes the third Almohad Caliph.
  • The warlord Ali b. Ghaniya and his brother Yahya seize by surprise the Almohad-dominated cities of Constantine, Béjaïa and Algiers. While they are away from their base in Mallorca, one of their brothers, Muhammad, takes control of the island and calls in the Almohads, whom intend to capture Mallorca for themselves. The Banu Ghaniya reenforcement arrives just in time from Africa, to defeat the Almohads and reassert their domination of the island.[1]
AsiaEdit
=Japan=
EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1185Edit

By areaEdit

AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit
=Japan=
=India=
  • Mohammad of Ghur takes Punjab and Lahore, overthrowing the Ghaznavids.
EuropeEdit
=British isles=
  • Henry II of England knights his heir John of England, and sends him to Ireland to enforce English control. According to Gerald of Wales, the only witness to chronicle the expedition, it is a disaster in which money is wasted on alcohol, and the Irish chieftains are scorned into uniting against a common enemy. By the end of the year, John has returned to England in defeat. Nonetheless, Henry gets him named King of Ireland by Pope Urban III, and procures a golden crown with peacock feathers.[26]
  • Templars settle in London and begin building the New Temple Church.
=Eastern Europe=
 
After Igor's battle with the Cumans

By topicEdit

AstronomyEdit
MarketsEdit
ReligionEdit

1186Edit

1187Edit

By areaEdit

AmericaEdit
AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit
EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

MarketsEdit
  • To finance the siege of Zara, the Doge of Venice grants the benefits of the revenue from the salt tax to a consortium of creditors. Pledging the income from the Salt Office becomes a staple of the city's finance.[47]
ReligionEdit

1188Edit

1189Edit

By placeEdit

AsiaEdit
EuropeEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Picard, Christophe (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
  2. ^ Geography at about.com
  3. ^ Baldwin, John (2006). Paris 1200. Paris: Aubier. p. 75.
  4. ^ Mélanges d'histoire de la médecine hébraïque, by Gad Freudenthal, Samuel S. Kottek, Paul Fenton compiled by Gad Freudenthal, Samuel S. Kottek published by Brill, 2002 ISBN 90-04-12522-1, 9789004125223
  5. ^ a b Abels, Richard Philip; Bernard S. Bachrach (2001). The Normans and their adversaries at war. Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer. p. 100. ISBN 0-85115-847-1.
  6. ^ Eastmond, Antony (2016) [2004]. Art and Identity in Thirteenth-Century Byzantium: Hagia Sophia and the Empire of Trebizond. Birmingham Byzantine and Ottoman Monographs. Volume 10. London and New York: Routledge. p. 157. ISBN 9781351957229.
  7. ^ Gregory, Timothy E. (2010) [2005]. A History of Byzantium (Second ed.). Malden, MA, Oxford and Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons. p. 309. ISBN 9781444359978.
  8. ^ Raccagni, Gianluca (2016-06-01). "When the Emperor Submitted to his Rebellious Subjects: A Neglected and Innovative Legal Account of the Peace of Constance, 1183" (PDF). The English Historical Review. 131 (550): 519–539. doi:10.1093/ehr/cew173. ISSN 0013-8266.
  9. ^ Sismondi, Jean-Charles-Léonard Simonde (1832). A History of the Italian Republics: Being a View of the Rise, Progress, and Fall of Italian Freedom. Philadelphia, PA: Carey & Lea. pp. 60–61.
  10. ^ Gillespie, Alexander (2016). The Causes of War. Volume II: 1000 CE to 1400 CE. Oxford and Portland, OR: Bloomsbury Publishing. p. 65. ISBN 9781782259541.
  11. ^ Das, Deb K. (22 November 2000). "1300 YEARS of Cricket: 700 to 2000 AD". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 26 June 2019. Joseph of Exeter, in 1183, gives the first complete description of this co-ed community activity. A ball is thrown at (and hit by) a batter wielding a staff which looks like today's baseball bat...the batter protects a piece of wood, perhaps a log or tree-stump, resting on a gate-like stand(could this be the origin of the term "stumps" in modern cricket?)...fielders are positioned all around, squires in front of the "wicket" and serfs behind...... This sport has clearly been going on for some time, and Joseph of Exeter calls it a "merrye" weekend recreation.
  12. ^ Göttler, Christine; Mochizuki, Mia (2017). The Nomadic Object: The Challenge of World for Early Modern Religious Art. Leiden, Boston: BRILL. p. 443. ISBN 9789004354500.
  13. ^ Brown, Delmer Myers; Ishida, Ichirō, eds. (1998) [1979]. The Clear Mirror: A Chronicle of the Japanese Court During the Kamakura Period (1185-1333). Berkeley, CA, Los Angeles & London: Stanford University Press. pp. 31–32. ISBN 9780804763882.
  14. ^ Brower, Robert H. (1972). ""Ex-Emperor Go-Toba's Secret Teachings": Go-Toba no in Gokuden". Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies. 32: 5–70. doi:10.2307/2718867. ISSN 0073-0548. JSTOR 2718867.
  15. ^ Henshall, Kenneth (2014). Historical Dictionary of Japan to 1945. Lanham, MA, Toronto, Plymouth, UK: Scarecrow Press. p. 96. ISBN 9780810878723.
  16. ^ Akiyama, Akira (2018-12-11). "Relic or Icon? The Place and Function of Imperial Regalia*". The Nomadic Object: 430–447. doi:10.1163/9789004354500_016. ISBN 9789004354500.
  17. ^ Turnbull, Stephen (2012) [2003]. Fighting Ships of the Far East. Volume 2: Japan and Korea AD 612–1639. Oxford and New York: Bloomsbury Publishing. p. 44. ISBN 9781782000433.
  18. ^ Turnbull, Stephen (2008). The Samurai Swordsman: Master of War. Barnsley, UK: Frontline Books. p. 28. ISBN 9781473817937.
  19. ^ Edbury, Peter W.; Rowe, John Gordon (1991) [1988]. William of Tyre: Historian of the Latin East. Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press Archive. pp. 20–21. ISBN 9780521407281.
  20. ^ Mallett, A.; Thomas, D. (2011). "William Of Tyre". Christian-Muslim Relations. A Bibliographical History. Volume 3 (1050-1200): 769–777.
  21. ^ Stevenson, W. B. (2012). The Crusaders in the East: A Brief History of the Wars of Islam with the Latins in Syria During the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 233–234. ISBN 9781107669093.
  22. ^ Tyerman, Christopher (2006). God's War: A New History of the Crusades. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. p. 363. ISBN 9780674023871.
  23. ^ Baedeker (Firm), Karl (1876). Palestine and Syria: Handbook for Travellers. London: K. Baedeker. p. 81.
  24. ^ Hamblin, William J. (2013). Shillington, Kevin (ed.). Encyclopedia of African History 3-Volume Set. I. New York, London: Routledge. p. 438. ISBN 9781135456702.
  25. ^ Ferris, Eleanor (1902). "The Financial Relations of the Knights Templars to the English Crown". American Historical Review. 8 (1).
  26. ^ King John by Warren. University of California Press, 1961. p. 35
  27. ^ Ferris, Eleanor (1902). "The Financial Relations of the Knights Templars to the English Crown". American Historical Review. 8 (1).
  28. ^ Huffman, Joseph Patrick (2009) [2000]. The Social Politics of Medieval Diplomacy: Anglo-German Relations (1066-1307). Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Civilization. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press. p. 121. ISBN 9780472024186.
  29. ^ Jackson, Guida M.; Jackson-Laufer, Guida Myrl (1999). Women Rulers Throughout the Ages: An Illustrated Guide. Santa Barbara, CA, Denver, CO and Oxford: ABC-CLIO. p. 106. ISBN 9781576070918.
  30. ^ Heng, Geraldine (2014). "An African Saint in Medieval Europe: The Black St Maurice and the Enigma of Racial Sanctity". Saints and Race: Marked Flesh, Holy Flesh, Ed. Vincent William Lloyd and Molly Harbour Bassett. Routledge: 24–25 – via Academia.edu.
  31. ^ Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature and Art (1877). Report and Transactions - The Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature and Art. Volume IX: Kingsbridge, July 1877. Plymouth, UK: W. Brendon & Son. p. 107.
  32. ^ Stubbs, William (2012). Gesta Regis Henrici Secundi Benedicti Abbatis. The Chronicle of the Reigns of Henry II and Richard I, AD 1169-1192: Known Commonly Under the Name of Benedict of Peterborough. Cambridge Library Collection (in Latin). Volume I. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press. p. 352. ISBN 9781108048750.
  33. ^ Gerald, Hannibal Gerald Duncan (1933). Immigration and Assimilation. Boston, New York: D. C. Heath and Company. p. 322. ISBN 9781171863298.
  34. ^ Lipson, Ephraim (1960). Europe in the 19th & 20th Centuries (Eighth ed.). New Delhi, Mumbai: Allied Publishers. p. 200. ISBN 9788170231448.
  35. ^ Brewer, Keagan; Kane, James (2019). The Conquest of the Holy Land by Ṣalāḥ al-Dīn: A critical edition and translation of the anonymous Libellus de expugnatione Terrae Sanctae per Saladinum. Crusader Texts in Translation. London and New York: Routledge. ISBN 9781351390699.
  36. ^ Edbury, Peter W. (1978). "The 'Cartulaire de Manosque': a Grant to the Templars in Latin Syria and a Charter of King Hugh I of Cyprus1". Historical Research. 51 (124): 174–181. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2281.1978.tb01877.x. ISSN 1468-2281. Joscius was already arch-bishop of Tyre in October 1186, and he died at an unknown date between October 1200 and May 1202
  37. ^ Lakshmipriya, T. (2008). "Conservation and Restoration of the Ta Prohm Temple". In D'Ayala, Dina; Fodde, Enrico (eds.). Structural Analysis of Historic Construction: Preserving Safety and Significance, Two Volume Set: Proceedings of the VI International Conference on Structural Analysis of Historic Construction, SAHC08, 2-4 July 2008, Bath, United Kingdom. Boa Raton, London, New York, Leiden: CRC Press. p. 1491. ISBN 9781439828229.
  38. ^ Schissler, Eric J. (2009). "An examination of Khmer prayer inside the Ta Prohm complex and its implications for Angkor management policy". CardinalScholar 1.0: 4. Khmer King Jayavarman VII ordered the construction of Ta Prohm, which was originally named Rajavihara. According to the temple stele, in C.E. 1186 Jayavarman VII dedicated Ta Prohm in his mother’s honor.
  39. ^ Welch, David J. (March 1989). "Late Prehistoric and Early Historic Exchange Patterns in the Phimai Region, Thailand". Journal of Southeast Asian Studies. 20 (1): 11–26. doi:10.1017/S0022463400019810. ISSN 1474-0680. The foundation stela at Ta Prohm (AD 1186) recorded the assignment of 3,140 settlements with nearly 80,000 persons to this shrine,
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  41. ^ Bauer, S. Wise (2013). The History of the Renaissance World: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Conquest of Constantinople. New York and London: W. W. Norton & Company. p. 165. ISBN 9780393059762.
  42. ^ Stanley, Lane-Poole (July 1898). "The Fight That Lost Jerusalem". The Cornhill Magazine. 5 (25): 64. The child-king, Baldwin V., was dead, and an intrigue had enthroned Sibylla, a daughter of the royal house of Jerusalem, and she had shared her crown with her husband, Guy of Lusignan
  43. ^ Riddell, Scott J.; Erlendsson, Egill; Eddudóttir, Sigrún D.; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; Kristjánsdóttir, Steinunn (2018-10-10). "Pollen, Plague & Protestants: The Medieval Monastery of Þingeyrar (Þingeyraklaustur) in Northern Iceland". Environmental Archaeology. 0: 1–18. doi:10.1080/14614103.2018.1531191. ISSN 1461-4103. Kirkjubæjarklaustur (AD 1186–1542)
  44. ^ Júlíusson, Árni Daníel; Lárusdottir, Birna; Lucas, Gavin; Pálsson, Gísli (2019-06-07). "Episcopal Economics". Scandinavian Journal of History. 0: 1–26. doi:10.1080/03468755.2019.1625436. ISSN 0346-8755. The nunnery of Kirkjubæjarklaustur in Southeast Iceland was, according to received scholarship, one of the oldest monasteries in Iceland, established in 1186
  45. ^ Enn Tarvel (2007). Sigtuna hukkumine. Haridus, 2007 (7-8), p 38–41
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  48. ^ a b King John by Warren. Published by University of California Press in 1961. p. 38
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