Year 1202 (MCCII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1202 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1202
MCCII
Ab urbe condita1955
Armenian calendar651
ԹՎ ՈԾԱ
Assyrian calendar5952
Balinese saka calendar1123–1124
Bengali calendar609
Berber calendar2152
English Regnal yearJoh. 1 – 4 Joh. 1
Buddhist calendar1746
Burmese calendar564
Byzantine calendar6710–6711
Chinese calendar辛酉(Metal Rooster)
3898 or 3838
    — to —
壬戌年 (Water Dog)
3899 or 3839
Coptic calendar918–919
Discordian calendar2368
Ethiopian calendar1194–1195
Hebrew calendar4962–4963
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1258–1259
 - Shaka Samvat1123–1124
 - Kali Yuga4302–4303
Holocene calendar11202
Igbo calendar202–203
Iranian calendar580–581
Islamic calendar598–599
Japanese calendarKennin 2
(建仁2年)
Javanese calendar1110–1111
Julian calendar1202
MCCII
Korean calendar3535
Minguo calendar710 before ROC
民前710年
Nanakshahi calendar−266
Thai solar calendar1744–1745
Tibetan calendar阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
1328 or 947 or 175
    — to —
阳水狗年
(male Water-Dog)
1329 or 948 or 176
The Crusaders conquering the city of Zadar (or Zara), by Andrea Vicentino.

EventsEdit

By placeEdit

Fourth CrusadeEdit

  • AprilMay – The bulk of the Crusader army gathers at Venice, although with far smaller numbers than expected: about 12,000 men (4–5,000 knights and 8,000 soldiers) instead of 33,500 men. Several contingents decide to make their own way to the Holy Land by different routes. A Crusader fleet, sailing from Flanders, carrying supplies for the Counts Baldwin IX and his brother Henry of Flanders, winters in Marseilles, but is slowed by adverse weather. Later it sails on to the Middle East, along with other contingents from southern France. [1]
  • Summer – The Crusader army, encamped on the island of San Niccolo di Lido, between the Venetian Lagoon and the Adriatic Sea, is threatened by Doge Enrico Dandolo to keep them interned, unless full payment is made as agreed (see 1201). As the Crusaders wait on the Lido for men to arrive, they also use up food supplies that Venice has agreed to supply. Dandolo faces a financial catastrophe, who has halted its commerce for a year's time, to prepare the expedition. The Crusader lords can offer Dandolo only 51,000 silver marks.[2]
  • September 8 – Enrico Dandolo takes the cross and agrees to lead a Venetian force, which, in an outburst of Crusading enthusiasm, reaches some 21,000 men – the largest contingent of the Fourth Crusade. He proclaims the debts will be wiped, if the Crusaders take the 'rebel' Dalmatian city of Zadar, who has pledged its loyalty to Emeric, king of Hungary and Croatia. The Zadar proposal causes disquiet in the Crusader ranks – but it upset also Pope Innocent III threatening to excommunicate those who attack Zadar.[3]
  • September – Prince Alexios Angelos sends representatives from Verona to the Crusader leaders in Venice, he promises to submit the Greek Orthodox Church to papal obedience and to provide the Crusade with 200,000 silver marks, together with provisions for a year. Alexios also will contribute 10,000 mounted soldiers to the expedition. In return he wants the Crusade to overthrow his uncle, the Byzantine emperor Alexios III (Angelos).[4]
  • November 1024Siege of Zadar: The Crusaders under Boniface of Montferrat besiege and conquer Zadar in Dalmatia. Despite letters from Innocent III forbidding such an action, and threatening excommunication. The leading citizens of Zadar hang banners of crosses along the outer walls, professing their Catholic faith. Nevertheless, the Crusaders breached and sacked the city, killing many.[5]
  • Winter – Innocent III excommunicates the Crusader army, along with the Venetians, which winters at Zadar. Many Crusaders, including some senior men, either abandon the Fourth Crusade or make their own way to the Holy Land. However, the majority remains in Zadar, where the army receives some welcome reinforcements. During the winter, negotiations continue with Alexios Angelos.[6]

EuropeEdit

Middle EastEdit

By topicEdit

LiteratureEdit

ReligionEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, p. 44. ISBN 978-1-84908-319-5.
  2. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, p. 44. ISBN 978-1-84908-319-5.
  3. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, p. 45. ISBN 978-1-84908-319-5.
  4. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, pp. 45–46. ISBN 978-1-84908-319-5.
  5. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, pp. 46–48. ISBN 978-1-84908-319-5.
  6. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, p. 48. ISBN 978-1-84908-319-5.
  7. ^ Bradbury, Jim (2007). The Capetians: Kings of France 987–1328, p. 179. Hambledon Continuum.
  8. ^ Warren, W. L. (1961). King John. University of California Press. pp. 77–78.
  9. ^ Ivane Javakhishvili (1983). History of the Georgian Nation, p. 249. Tbilisi: Georgia.
  10. ^ Tyerman, Christopher (2006). God's War: A New History of the Crusades, pp. 689–691. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. ISBN 0-674-02387-0.
  11. ^ Georg Haggren; Petri Halinen; Mika Lavento; Sami Raninen ja Anna Wessman (2015). Muinaisuutemme jäljet. Helsinki: Gaudeamus. p. 380.
  12. ^ Picard, Christophe (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
  13. ^ David Nicolle (2011). Osprey: Campaign - Nr. 237. The Fourth Crusade 1202–04. The betrayal of Byzantium, p. 17. ISBN 978-1-84908-319-5.