Year 1101 (MCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. It was the 2nd year of the 1100s decade, and the 1st year of the 12th century.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1101 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1101
MCI
Ab urbe condita1854
Armenian calendar550
ԹՎ ՇԾ
Assyrian calendar5851
Balinese saka calendar1022–1023
Bengali calendar508
Berber calendar2051
English Regnal yearHen. 1 – 2 Hen. 1
Buddhist calendar1645
Burmese calendar463
Byzantine calendar6609–6610
Chinese calendar庚辰(Metal Dragon)
3797 or 3737
    — to —
辛巳年 (Metal Snake)
3798 or 3738
Coptic calendar817–818
Discordian calendar2267
Ethiopian calendar1093–1094
Hebrew calendar4861–4862
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1157–1158
 - Shaka Samvat1022–1023
 - Kali Yuga4201–4202
Holocene calendar11101
Igbo calendar101–102
Iranian calendar479–480
Islamic calendar494–495
Japanese calendarKōwa 3
(康和3年)
Javanese calendar1006–1007
Julian calendar1101
MCI
Korean calendar3434
Minguo calendar811 before ROC
民前811年
Nanakshahi calendar−367
Seleucid era1412/1413 AG
Thai solar calendar1643–1644
Tibetan calendar阳金龙年
(male Iron-Dragon)
1227 or 846 or 74
    — to —
阴金蛇年
(female Iron-Snake)
1228 or 847 or 75
A map of western Anatolia, showing the movements during the Crusade of 1101.

EventsEdit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit

LevantEdit

  • Spring – King Baldwin I concludes an alliance with the Genoese fleet, offering them commercial privileges and booty. He captures the towns of Arsuf and Caesarea. Baldwin's crusaders pillage Caesarea and massacre the mayority of the local population.
  • September 7Battle of Ramla: A Crusader force (some 1,100 men) under Baldwin I defeats the invading Fatimids at Ramla (modern Israel). Baldwin plunders the Fatimid camp and the survivors flee to Ascalon.

EuropeEdit

EnglandEdit

By topicEdit

CultureEdit

ReligionEdit


BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Steven Runciman (1951). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 20. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  2. ^ Steven Runciman (1951). A History of the Crusades. Volume I: The First Crusade and the Foundation of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 264. ISBN 978-0-141-98550-3.
  3. ^ Lagardère, Vincent (1989). Les Almoravides jusqu'au règne de Yūsuf b. Tāšfīn (1039-1106). Paris: L'Harmattan. ISBN 978-2-7384-0467-1.
  4. ^ Klaniczay, Gábor; Eva Pálmai (2002). Holy Rulers and Blessed Princesses. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-42018-1.
  5. ^ "Conrad | king of the Germans". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved March 31, 2019.