The English Historical Review

The English Historical Review is a bimonthly peer-reviewed academic journal that was established in 1886[1] and published by Oxford University Press (formerly Longman). It publishes articles on all aspects of history – British, European, and world history – since the classical era. It is the oldest surviving English language academic journal in the discipline of history.

The English Historical Review
The English Historical Review.gif
DisciplineHistory
LanguageEnglish
Edited by
  • Nandini Chatterjee
  • Stephen Conway
  • Peter Marshall
  • Jan Rüger
  • Hannah Skoda
  • Alice Taylor
Publication details
History1886–present
Publisher
FrequencyBimonthly
0.655 (2020)
Standard abbreviations
ISO 4Engl. Hist. Rev.
Indexing
ISSN0013-8266 (print)
1477-4534 (web)
LCCN05040370
JSTOR00138266
OCLC no.474766029
Links

Six issues are published each year, and typically include four articles from a broad chronological range (roughly, medieval, early modern, modern and twentieth century) and around sixty book reviews. Review Articles are commissioned by the editors. A summary of international periodical literature published in the previous twelve months is also provided, and an annual summary of editions, reference works and other materials of interest to scholars is also produced.[2]

The journal was established in 1886 by John Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton, Regius professor of modern history at Cambridge, and a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford.[3] The first editor was Mandell Creighton. The current editors are Nandini Chatterjee, Stephen Conway, Peter Marshall, Jan Rüger, Hannah Skoda, and Alice Taylor.[4]

List of editorsEdit

Editors of The English Historical Review:

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Horn, D. B.; Ransome, Mary, eds. (1957). English Historical Documents: 1714-1783. English Historical Documents, volume 10. Oxford University Press. p. 76.
  2. ^ "Oxford Journals | Arts & Humanities | English Historical Review | About the Journal". www.oxfordjournals.org. Retrieved 19 January 2016.
  3. ^ R. C. S. Trahair, From Aristotelian to Reaganomics: a dictionary of eponyms with biographies in the social sciences (1994), p. 5
  4. ^ "Oxford Journals | Arts & Humanities | English Historical Review | Editorial Board". www.oxfordjournals.org. Retrieved 7 May 2022.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit