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The 1080s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1080, and ended on December 31, 1089.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
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EventsEdit

1080

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
ArmeniaEdit
AfricaEdit
ChinaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1081Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
Seljuk EmpireEdit
  • Seljuk emir Tzachas (or Chaka Bey) conquers Smyrna (modern-day İzmir) and founds a short-lived independent state, which emerges as the first sea power in Turkish history.

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1082Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
AsiaEdit
  • The Korean printing of the entire Buddhism Tripitaka is completed (approximate date).

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1083Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AfricaEdit

1084Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
Seljuk EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1085Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
  • The Domesday survey is commissioned by King William I (the Conqueror),[17] apparently prompted by the abortive invasion of Canute IV, to ensure proper taxation and levies.[18]
ChinaEdit
  • April 1 – Emperor Zhe Zong ascends the throne at the age of 8 under the supervision of his grandmother, Grand Empress Dowager Gao. She cancels the reform policy of Chancellor Wang Anshi.
  • The output of copper currency for the Chinese Song Dynasty reaches 6 billion coins a year, prompting the Chinese government to adopt the world's first paper-printed money later in the 1120s.

1086Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
  • August 1 – King William I (the Conqueror) calls for a meeting at Old Sarum, where he invites his major vassals and tenants-in-chief to swear allegiance to him. The oath is known as the Oath of Salisbury.
  • The Domesday Book is completed, which is drawn up on the orders of William I. It describes in detail the landholdings and resources in England.
  • The population in England is estimated to be 1.25 million citizens with 10% living in boroughs.[20]
Seljuk EmpireEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1087Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AfricaEdit
JapanEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1088Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
  • Spring – A rebellion led by William the Conqueror's half-brothers Odo of Bayeux and Robert (2nd Earl of Cornwall), begins against King William II with the aim to remove him from the throne. Odo's revolt in Kent and Sussex is supported by nobles across the country.
  • The Worcestershire rebellion led by Robert de Lacy (a son of Ilbert de Lacy) is dealt with quickly by Wulfstan, bishop of Worcester, who calls on those knights and local landowners still loyal to William II to defend Worcester. Many of the rebels are captured or killed.
  • William II calls the representatives of the fyrd to a meeting in London. He promises (with the support of Lanfranc, bishop of Canterbury) the people better laws, and the removal of taxes if they support him against the rebels.
  • William II lay siege to Pevensey Castle where Odo of Bayeux has taken shelter with Robert. Odo is forced to surrender, and agrees to go to Rochester to convince the rebels to accept William as the rightful king of England.
  • Summer – William II lay siege to Rochester Castle and puts down the revolt. Odo of Bayeux and the rebels surrender (only agreeing that their lives will be spared). William takes Odo's lands and exiles him to Normandy.
AfricaEdit

By topicEdit

Arts and CultureEdit
EducationEdit
GeologyEdit
ReligionEdit

1089Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Brian Todd Carey (2012). Road to Manzikert: Byzantine and Islamic Warfare (527–1071), p. 158. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1.
  2. ^ John France. Victory in the East (Book extract). Godfrey was almost certainly present in support of Henry IV at the battle of Elster in 1080 (sic 1085... an error or typo), when the forces of the anti-king Rudolf triumphed on the field only to see their victory nullified because Rudolf was killed.
  3. ^ Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, pp. 113–114. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  4. ^ Picard C. (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident au Moyen Age. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
  5. ^ Herbert Edward John Cowdrey (1998). Pope Gregory VII, 1073–1085, pp. 201–202 (Oxford University Press).
  6. ^ Brian Todd Carey (2012). Road to Manzikert: Byzantine and Islamic Warfare (527–1071), p. 158. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1.
  7. ^ Norwich, John Julius (1995). Byzantium: The Decline and Fall, p. 16. London, United Kingdom: Viking. ISBN 0-670-82377-5.
  8. ^ The Welsh Academy. Encyclopaedia of Wales.
  9. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 282. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  10. ^ Crowley, Roger (2012). City of Fortune: How Venice Ruled the Seas. New York: Random House. ISBN 978-1400068203.
  11. ^ Yates, Nigel; Welsby, Paul A. (1996). Faith and Fabric: A History of Rochester Cathedral, 604-1994. Boydell & Brewer. p. 217. ISBN 9780851155814.
  12. ^ Martínez Diez, Gonzalo (2007). El Cid histórico (in Spanish), p. 137. Barcelona: Editorial Planeta, S.A. ISBN 978-84-08-07165-5.
  13. ^ Picard C. (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident au Moyen Age. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
  14. ^ "Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 8 August 2018.
  15. ^ E, Harvey G. (2000). History of Burma. Asian Educational Services. p. 36. ISBN 9788120613652.
  16. ^ "Carthusian religious order". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 8 August 2018.
  17. ^ "Domesday Book". www.nationalarchives.gov.uk. Retrieved 25 April 2018.
  18. ^ "British History in depth: The Domesday Book". BBC - History. Retrieved 25 April 2018.
  19. ^ Dobson, R. B. (2000). Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages. New York: Routledge. p. 1349. ISBN 1-57958-282-6.
  20. ^ W.G. Hoskins, "The Making of the English Landscape", Hodder & Stoughton 1955, also Pelican Books 1970.
  21. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 83.
  22. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 56.
  23. ^ Kleinhenz, Christopher (2010). Medieval Italy: an encyclopedia. New York: Routledge. p. 95. ISBN 0-415-93930-5.
  24. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658–1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 83.
  25. ^ McGrank, Lawrence (1981). "Norman crusaders and the Catalan reconquest: Robert Burdet and te principality of Tarragona 1129–55". Journal of Medieval History. 7 (1): 67–82. doi:10.1016/0304-4181(81)90036-1.
  26. ^ Canellas, Angel (1951). "Las Cruzadas de Aragon en el Siglo XI". Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved February 22, 2012. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  27. ^ Pope Bl. Urban II, Catholic Encyclopedia, http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15210a.htm
  28. ^ Siecienski 2010, p. 117.