Year 1105 (MCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1105 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1105
MCV
Ab urbe condita1858
Armenian calendar554
ԹՎ ՇԾԴ
Assyrian calendar5855
Balinese saka calendar1026–1027
Bengali calendar512
Berber calendar2055
English Regnal yearHen. 1 – 6 Hen. 1
Buddhist calendar1649
Burmese calendar467
Byzantine calendar6613–6614
Chinese calendar甲申(Wood Monkey)
3801 or 3741
    — to —
乙酉年 (Wood Rooster)
3802 or 3742
Coptic calendar821–822
Discordian calendar2271
Ethiopian calendar1097–1098
Hebrew calendar4865–4866
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1161–1162
 - Shaka Samvat1026–1027
 - Kali Yuga4205–4206
Holocene calendar11105
Igbo calendar105–106
Iranian calendar483–484
Islamic calendar498–499
Japanese calendarChōji 2
(長治2年)
Javanese calendar1010–1011
Julian calendar1105
MCV
Korean calendar3438
Minguo calendar807 before ROC
民前807年
Nanakshahi calendar−363
Seleucid era1416/1417 AG
Thai solar calendar1647–1648
Tibetan calendar阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1231 or 850 or 78
    — to —
阴木鸡年
(female Wood-Rooster)
1232 or 851 or 79
Baldwin I defeats the Fatimids (1105).

EventsEdit

By placeEdit

LevantEdit

EuropeEdit

EnglandEdit

  • Summer – King Henry I invades Normandy, takes Bayeux (after a short siege) and Caen. He advances on Falaise, and starts inconclusive peace negotiations with Duke Robert II (Curthose). Henry withdraws to deal with political issues at home.
  • Henry I meets Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, under threat of excommunication at L'Aigle in Normandy to settle their disputes that has led to Anselm's exile from England (see 1103).

Seljuk EmpireEdit

AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 49. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  2. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, pp. 72–73. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  3. ^ Picard C. (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident au Moyen Age. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
  4. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 39. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  5. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of the Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 87. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.