1100s (decade)

The 1100s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1100, and ended on December 31, 1109.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

EventsEdit

1100

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
EuropeEdit
AfricaEdit
ChinaEdit
  • February 23 – Emperor Zhe Zong dies after a 15-year reign. He is succeeded by his 17-year-old brother Hui Zong as ruler of the Song Dynasty.
  • In Kaifeng, capital of the Song Dynasty, is the number of registered citizens within the walls about 1,050,000. The army stationed there boosts the overall populace to some 1.4 million people.
  • The Liao Dynasty crushes the Zubu, a tribute state of the Khitan Empire, and takes their khan prisoner.
  • The Chinese population reaches about 100 million during the Song Dynasty (approximate date).
AmericasEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit
TechnologyEdit

1101Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
LevantEdit
  • Spring – King Baldwin I concludes an alliance with the Genoese fleet, offering them commercial privileges and booty. He captures the towns of Arsuf and Caesarea. Baldwin's crusaders pillage Caesarea and massacre the mayority of the local population.
  • September 7Battle of Ramla: A Crusader force (some 1,100 men) under Baldwin I defeats the invading Fatimids at Ramla (modern Israel). Baldwin plunders the Fatimid camp and the survivors flee to Ascalon.
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit

By topicEdit

CultureEdit
ReligionEdit

1102Edit

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1103Edit

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
ChinaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1104Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
LevantEdit
  • Spring – The Crusaders, led by Bohemond I, re-invade the territory of Aleppo, and try to capture the town of Kafar Latha. The attack fails, owing to the resistance of the local Banu tribe. Meanwhile, Joscelin of Courtenay cuts the communications between Aleppo and the Euphrates.[26]
  • May 7Battle of Harran: The Crusaders under Baldwin II are defeated by the Seljuk Turks. Baldwin and Joscelin of Courtenay are taken prisoner. Tancred (nephew of Bohemond I) becomes regent of Edessa. The defeat at Harran marks a key turning point of Crusader expansion.
  • May 26 – King Baldwin I captures Acre, the port is besieged from April, and blockaded by the Genoese and Pisan fleet. Baldwin promises a free passage to those who wants to move to Ascalon, but the Italian sailors plunder the wealthy Muslim emigrants and kill many of them.[27]
  • Autumn – Bohemond I departs to Italy for reinforcements. He takes with him gold and silver, and precious stuff to raise an army against Emperor Alexios I (Komnenos). Tancred becomes co-ruler over Antioch – and appoints his brother-in-law, Richard of Salerno, as his deputy.[28]
  • Toghtekin, Seljuk ruler (atabeg) of Damascus, founds a short-lived principality in Syria (the first example of a series of Seljuk ruler dynasties).
EnglandEdit
EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

VolcanologyEdit
  • Autumn – The volcano Hekla erupts in Iceland and devastates farms for 45 miles (some 70 km) around.[31]
ReligionEdit

1105Edit

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
  • Summer – King Henry I invades Normandy, takes Bayeux (after a short siege) and Caen. He advances on Falaise, and starts inconclusive peace negotiations with Duke Robert II (Curthose). Henry withdraws to deal with political issues at home.
  • Henry I meets Anselm, archbishop of Canterbury, under threat of excommunication at L'Aigle in Normandy to settle their disputes that has led to Anselm's exile from England (see 1103).
Seljuk EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1106Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit

By topicEdit

AstronomyEdit
  • February 2 – A comet (the Great Comet of 1106) is seen and reported by several civilisations around the world. Lasting for 40 days, the comet grows steadily in brightness until finally fading away.[40]

1107Edit

By placeEdit

EnglandEdit
EuropeEdit
LevantEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

CommerceEdit
  • Chinese authorities print paper money in three colors to thwart counterfeiting (approximate date).
LiteratureEdit

1108Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
LevantEdit
  • Summer – Jawali Saqawa, Turkish ruler (atabeg) of Mosul, accepts a ransom of 30,000 dinar by Count Joscelin I and releases his cousin Baldwin II, count of Edessa, who is held as prisoner (see 1104).[52]
  • Baldwin II marches out against Sidon, with the support of a squadron of sailor-adventurers from various Italian cities. A Fatimid fleet from Egypt defeats the Italians in a sea-battle outside the harbour.[53]
AsiaEdit
  • The Taira and Minamoto clans join forces to rule Japan, after defeating the warrior monks of the Enryaku-ji temple near Kyoto. The Taira replaces many Fujiwara nobles in important offices – while the Minamoto gains more military experience by bringing parts of Northern Honshu under Japanese control (approximate date).

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1109Edit

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

EducationEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

ReferencesEdit

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