Year 1122 (MCXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1122 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1122
MCXXII
Ab urbe condita1875
Armenian calendar571
ԹՎ ՇՀԱ
Assyrian calendar5872
Balinese saka calendar1043–1044
Bengali calendar529
Berber calendar2072
English Regnal year22 Hen. 1 – 23 Hen. 1
Buddhist calendar1666
Burmese calendar484
Byzantine calendar6630–6631
Chinese calendar辛丑(Metal Ox)
3818 or 3758
    — to —
壬寅年 (Water Tiger)
3819 or 3759
Coptic calendar838–839
Discordian calendar2288
Ethiopian calendar1114–1115
Hebrew calendar4882–4883
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1178–1179
 - Shaka Samvat1043–1044
 - Kali Yuga4222–4223
Holocene calendar11122
Igbo calendar122–123
Iranian calendar500–501
Islamic calendar515–516
Japanese calendarHōan 3
(保安3年)
Javanese calendar1027–1028
Julian calendar1122
MCXXII
Korean calendar3455
Minguo calendar790 before ROC
民前790年
Nanakshahi calendar−346
Seleucid era1433/1434 AG
Thai solar calendar1664–1665
Tibetan calendar阴金牛年
(female Iron-Ox)
1248 or 867 or 95
    — to —
阳水虎年
(male Water-Tiger)
1249 or 868 or 96
Emperor Henry V (r. 1111–1125)

EventsEdit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit

  • Battle of Beroia: Emperor John II (Komnenos) transfers the Byzantine field army from Asia Minor (where it has been engaged against the Seljuk Turks) to the Balkans. The Pechenegs who have set up their camp (defended by a circular formation of wagons) near Beroia (modern Bulgaria) are defeated. John orders the Varangian Guard (some 480 men), the elite Palace Guard to hack their way through the Pecheneg circle of wagons, causing a general rout in their camp. Pecheneg survivors are taken captive and enlisted into the Byzantine army.[1]

LevantEdit

EuropeEdit

EurasiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Cinnamus, Ioannes (1976). Deeds of John and Manuel Comnenus, p. 16. New York, New York and West Sussex, United Kingdom: Columbia University Press. ISBN 978-0-23-104080-8.
  2. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 130. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  3. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem, p. 134. ISBN 978-0-241-29876-3.
  4. ^ Fletcher, R. A. (1987). "Reconquest and Crusade in Spain c. 1050-1150". Transactions of the Royal Historical Society. 5. 37: 31–47 [45]. JSTOR 3679149.
  5. ^ Picard, C. (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident au Moyen Age. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.