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The 1740s decade ran from January 1, 1740, to December 31, 1749.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
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Contents

EventsEdit

1740

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1741Edit

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1742Edit

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1743Edit

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

UndatedEdit

1744Edit

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1745Edit

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

1746Edit

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1747Edit

January–JuneEdit

July–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1748Edit

January–MarchEdit

April–JuneEdit

July–SeptemberEdit

October –DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1749Edit

January–MarchEdit

April–JuneEdit

July–SeptemberEdit

  • July 9 – The British naval fort at Halifax is founded on mainland Nova Scotia as a defense against the New France Fortress of Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island, less than 100 miles (160 km) away.
  • August 2 – Irish-born trader George Croghan, unaware of the recent British grant of land in the Ohio River valley to the Ohio Company, purchases 200,000 acres of much of the same land from the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, dealing directly with "the three most important Iroquois chiefs resident in that area, in return for an immense quantity of Indian goods." The deal takes place at the Iroquois capital of Onondaga, near present-day Syracuse, New York.[31]
  • August 3
  • August 7Mary Musgrove Bosomworth, a woman of mixed British and Creek Indian ancestry, presents herself as Coosaponakeesa, Queen of the Creek Indians and marches with 200 Creek Indians into the town of Savannah, Georgia. During her confrontation with British colonial authorities, she and her husband Thomas Bosomworth demand payment of "nearly twenty-five thousand dollars" in compensation for property taken from the Creek Indians, before the British authorities determine that she doesn't have the authority to speak for the tribe. [34]
  • August 15 – Four Russian sailors— Aleksei Inkov, Khrisanf Inkov, Stepan Sharapov and Fedor Verigin— are rescued after having been marooned on the Arctic Ocean island of Edgeøya for more than six years. They are the only survivors of a crew of 14 whose koch had been blown off course in May 1743 and then broken up by ice.[35] The four are returned home on September 28.
  • August 19 – At a ceremony in San Antonio, Texas (then a part of the New Spain province of Nuevo Santander), four Apache chiefs and Spanish colonial officials and missionaries literally "bury the hatchet", placing weapons of war into a pit and covering it as a symbol that the Apaches and the Spaniards will fight no further war against each other.[36]
  • September 5 – A delegation of 33 members of the Catawba Indian nation and 73 from the Cherokee nation arrive in Charleston, South Carolina, to discuss a peace treaty with South Carolina's provincial governor, James Glen.[37]
  • September 23 – Grand Chief Jean-Baptiste Cope, of the Miꞌkmaq Indian nation in Canada, declares war against the British Empire [38] after the building of the fort at Halifax, Nova Scotia and begins hostilities by taking 20 British hostages at Canso.[39]
  • September 28 – Three Russian survivors of the shipwreck on Edgeøya return to their homeland after more than six years, as the ship Nikolai i Andrei brings them to the port of Archangelsk.[35] A fourth survivor, Fedor Veriginare, died of scurvy during the six-week voyage home.

October–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 308. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  2. ^ "image: Bird's eye view of Batavia showing the massacre of the Chinese". Archived from the original on September 21, 2009. Retrieved November 12, 2006.
  3. ^ Hibbert, Christopher, ed. (1988). The Encyclopædia of Oxford. London: Macmillan. p. 182. ISBN 0-333-39917-X.
  4. ^ "Historical Events for Year 1741 | OnThisDay.com". Historyorb.com. Retrieved 2018-04-08.
  5. ^ "A dozen Downing Street departures". BBC News. 2007-05-09. Archived from the original on August 23, 2007. Retrieved 2007-07-14.
  6. ^ Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 309. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  7. ^ "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) p50
  8. ^ Giscombe, C. S. (Winter 2012). "Precarious Creatures". The Kenyon Review. Gambier, Ohio: Kenyon College. 34 (NS) (1): 157–175. JSTOR 41304743. I looked it up later and found out that it's generally conceded that they were all dead by the 1680s. But a story persists that a fellow named MacQueen killed the last wolf in Scotland - and, implicitly, in all Britain - after that, in 1743. (Henry Shoemaker mentions the story in the section of Extinct Pennsylvania Animals that concerns wolves.)
  9. ^ Rules of Golf 1744 Scottish Golf History accessed 10 Feb 2017 http://www.scottishgolfhistory.org/origin-of-golf-terms/rules-of-golf/
  10. ^ Instructions, golf club rules and competitions History of Golf accessed 10 Feb 2017 History of golf
  11. ^ a b c d e Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 310–311. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  12. ^ Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 217–218. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2.
  13. ^ Unless the Battle of Graveney Marsh (1940) is counted.
  14. ^ Van den Heuvel, Danielle (Spring 2012). "The Multiple Identities of Early Modern Dutch Fishwives". Signs. University of Chicago Press. 37 (3): 587–594. doi:10.1086/662705. JSTOR 10.1086/662705. ... in 1747 fishwives organized a large political demonstration in Amsterdam, and in 1748 the Amsterdam fish hawker Marretje Arents was one of the principal initiators of a tax riot in the city.
  15. ^ "Ahmad Shah Abdali's invasions". Retrieved 2011-11-02.
  16. ^ a b c "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) p51
  17. ^ Elizabeth A. H. John, Storms Brewed in Other Men's Worlds: The Confrontation of Indians, Spanish, and French in the Southwest, 1540-1795 (University of Oklahoma Press, 1996) pp282-283
  18. ^ Francis Henry Skrine, Fontenoy and Great Britain's Share in the War of the Austrian Succession, 1741-1748 (W. Blackwood and Sons, 1906) pp346-347
  19. ^ Charles Rathbone Low, History of the Indian Navy: (1613-1863) (Richard Bentley and Son, 1877) p140
  20. ^ Henry Eyster Jacobs, A History of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the United States (The Christian Literature Co., 1893 p243
  21. ^ Thomas p 263
  22. ^ Paul Peucker, A Time of Sifting: Mystical Marriage and the Crisis of Moravian Piety in the Eighteenth Century (Penn State Press, 2015)
  23. ^ H. Parker Willis (December 1895). "Income Taxation in France". Journal of Political Economy. The University of Chicago Press. 4 (1): 37–53. doi:10.1086/250324. The war of the Austrian Succession for the third time threw the treasury back upon the hated fiscal resource in October of 1741, when the income tax was reintroduced accompanied by a royal promise to the effect that upon the close of the war this means of raising revenue should once for all be done away with.
  24. ^ a b Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. p. 313. ISBN 0-304-35730-8.
  25. ^ Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 219–220. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2.
  26. ^ Peter N. Moore, Archibald Simpson's Unpeaceable Kingdom: The Ordeal of Evangelicalism in the Colonial South (Lexington Books, 2018) p40
  27. ^ Henry L. Fulton, Dr. John Moore, 1729–1802: A Life in Medicine, Travel, and Revolution (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014) p54
  28. ^ All Music Guide to Classical Music: The Definitive Guide to Classical Music, ed. by Chris Woodstra, et al. (Hal Leonard Corporation, 2013) p556
  29. ^ John R. Spears and A. H. Clark, A History of the Mississippi Valley: From Its Discovery to the End of Foreign Domination (A. S. Clark, 1903) p123
  30. ^ "Fires, Great", in The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance, Cornelius Walford, ed. (C. and E. Layton, 1876) p51
  31. ^ Nicholas B. Wainwright, George Croghan: Wilderness Diplomat (University of North Carolina Press, 1959) p28
  32. ^ Spencer C. Tucker, ed., A Global Chronology of Conflict: From the Ancient World to the Modern Middle East (ABC-CLIO, 2009) p756
  33. ^ Terry A. Barnhart, American Antiquities: Revisiting the Origins of American Archaeology (University of Nebraska Press, 2015)
  34. ^ Sara Hines Martin, Georgia's Remarkable Women: Daughters, Wives, Sisters, and Mothers Who Shaped History (Rowman & Littlefield, 2015) p15
  35. ^ a b David Roberts, Four Against the Arctic: Shipwrecked for Six Years at the Top of the World (Simon and Schuster, 2005) p10
  36. ^ Joseph Luther, Camp Verde: Texas Frontier Defense (Arcadia Publishing, 2012)
  37. ^ Michelle LeMaster, Brothers Born of One Mother: British–Native American Relations in the Colonial Southeast (University of Virginia Press, 2012)
  38. ^ "The Covenant Chain", by Elsie Charles Basque, in Dawnland Voices: An Anthology of Indigenous Writing from New England (University of Nebraska Press, 2014) p37
  39. ^ a b "'Black with Canoes'. Aboriginal Resistance and the Canoe", by David McNab, et al., in Technology, Disease, and Colonial Conquests, Sixteenth to Eighteenth Centuries, ed. by George Raudzens (Brill Academic Publishers, 2003) p261
  40. ^ Allan J. Kuethe and Kenneth J. Andrien, The Spanish Atlantic World in the Eighteenth Century: War and the Bourbon Reforms, 1713–1796 (Cambridge University Press, 2014) pp167-168
  41. ^ Michael Dekker, French & Indian Wars in Maine (Arcadia Publishing, 2015) p95
  42. ^ J. M. Toner, annotations to Journal of My Journey Over the Mountains, by George Washington, while Surveying for Lord Thomas Fairfax, Baron of Cameron, in the Northern Neck of Virginia, beyond the Blue Ridge, in 1747-8 (Joel Munsell's Sons, 1892) p64.
  43. ^ "Child Abduction Panic", in Outbreak!: The Encyclopedia of Extraordinary Social Behavior, ed. by Hilary Evans and Robert E. Bartholomew (Anomalist Books, LLC, 2009) pp83-84
  44. ^ Christine Pevitt Algrant, Madame de Pompadour: Mistress of France (Grove Press, 2003) p95
  45. ^ Robert A. Voeks, The Ethnobotany of Eden: Rethinking the Jungle Medicine Narrative (University of Chicago Press, 2018) pp113-114
  46. ^ "The Baptism of Sultan Azim ud-Din of Sulu", by Eberhard Crailsheim, in Image - Object - Performance: Mediality and Communication in Cultural Contact Zones of Colonial Latin America and the Philippines, ed. by Astrid Windus, et al. (Waxmann Verlag, 2013) pp97-98
  47. ^ Cuthbert Girdlestone, Jean-Philippe Rameau: His Life and Work (Courier Corporation, 2014) p278
  48. ^ Gregory Orfalea, Journey to the Sun: Junipero Serra's Dream and the Founding of California (Simon and Schuster, 2014) p80
  49. ^ Martin Sicker, The Islamic World in Decline: From the Treaty of Karlowitz to the Disintegration of the Ottoman Emxpire (Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001) p65