1669 (MDCLXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1669th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 669th year of the 2nd millennium, the 69th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1669, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1669 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1669
MDCLXIX
Ab urbe condita2422
Armenian calendar1118
ԹՎ ՌՃԺԸ
Assyrian calendar6419
Balinese saka calendar1590–1591
Bengali calendar1076
Berber calendar2619
English Regnal year20 Cha. 2 – 21 Cha. 2
Buddhist calendar2213
Burmese calendar1031
Byzantine calendar7177–7178
Chinese calendar戊申年 (Earth Monkey)
4365 or 4305
    — to —
己酉年 (Earth Rooster)
4366 or 4306
Coptic calendar1385–1386
Discordian calendar2835
Ethiopian calendar1661–1662
Hebrew calendar5429–5430
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1725–1726
 - Shaka Samvat1590–1591
 - Kali Yuga4769–4770
Holocene calendar11669
Igbo calendar669–670
Iranian calendar1047–1048
Islamic calendar1079–1080
Japanese calendarKanbun 8
(寛文8年)
Javanese calendar1591–1592
Julian calendarGregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar4002
Minguo calendar243 before ROC
民前243年
Nanakshahi calendar201
Thai solar calendar2211–2212
Tibetan calendar阳土猴年
(male Earth-Monkey)
1795 or 1414 or 642
    — to —
阴土鸡年
(female Earth-Rooster)
1796 or 1415 or 643
September 27: After 21 years the siege of Candia ends.

EventsEdit

January–MarchEdit

April–JuneEdit

July–SeptemberEdit

  • July 13Trinh Tac, the warlord who administers the Kingdom of Vietnam, issues an order banning all foreign vessels from entering the harbor at Hanoi, requiring to anchor no closer than the river port at Pho Hien, 35 miles (56 km) down the Red River from Hanoi.
  • July 16 – A rockfall from the Mönchsberg mountain above Salzburg in Austria kills 230 people as tons of the mountainside fall onto a neighborhood on a street, the Gstättengasse.
  • July 24 – During an attempt by a fleet of French Navy ships to stop the siege of Candia by bombardment of Ottoman positions on the island of Crete, the arsenal of gunpowder on the French flagship, the 56-gun warship Thérèse, catches fire and explodes. Out of 350 crew on the Thérèse, only seven survive. Demoralized, the remaining French commanders halt the bombardment and the fleet withdraws.
  • July 25 – Pieter Bickel, a Lutheran pastor and a mountaineer in Austria, becomes the first person ever to climb to the peak of the tallest of the Southeastern Walsertal Mountains, the 8,310 feet (2,530 m) Großer Widderstein.
  • July – The Hanseatic League, after 400 years of operation, holds its last official meeting, taking place at the city of Lübeck. At its height, the economic alliance of German cities had 180 members; only nine (Lübeck, Hamburg, Bremen, Danzig, Braunschweig, Cologne, Hildesheim, Osnabrück and Rostock) are represented for the final gathering. [6] According to one author, the final series of meetings had started on May 29, 1669. [7]
  • August 17 – A group of English settlers, led by Joseph West, departs from The Downs on the ship Carolina with instructions to make the first European settlement in what is now the U.S. state of South Carolina. After a long voyage with stops in Ireland and Barbados, the Carolina settlers arrive at Port Royal on March 17.
  • August 24 – "The Man in the Iron Mask", a prisoner identified as "Eustache Dauger", arrives at the French fortress of Pignerol, with Bénigne Dauvergne de Saint-Mars in charge of his incarceration. Because the identity of the prisoner is kept secret with a cloth mask over his face, a legend begins that his facial covering is made of iron. Dauger's identity is never confirmed, but French novelist and historian theorizes in a 1965 book, Le Secret du Masque de fer, that Dauger was the older, illegitimate brother of France's King Louis XIV, punished for conspiracy against the crown.
  • August 25 – The day after the verdicts at the Mora witch trial in Sweden, 14 women and one man are publicly beheaded after having confessed to various crimes involving the use of "enchanted tools" on behalf of the Devil. Another 47 persons convicted are taken away for a later execution.
  • September 6Francesco Morosini, capitano generale of the Venetian forces in the siege of Candia, surrenders to the Ottomans.
  • September 23Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor grants the status and privileges of a university to the Jesuit Academy in Zagreb, the precursor to the modern University of Zagreb.
  • September 29 – The formal coronation of Michał Korybut Wiśniowiecki as King of Poland (and Grand Duke of Lithuania takes place in Kraków.

October–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

BirthsEdit

DeathsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ David Cordingly, Under the Black Flag: The Romance and Reality of Life Among the Pirates (Random House, 1996) p. 48
  2. ^ Christiane Aulanier, Le Pavillon de Flore (Editions des Musées Nationaux, 1971) p. 20
  3. ^ Alfred Rupert Hall, Isaac Newton: Adventurer in Thought (Cambridge University Press, 1996) p. 67
  4. ^ "Mount Etna | Eruptions, History, & Facts". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved April 7, 2019.
  5. ^ "Pepys' last words". The Telegraph. May 31, 2016. Retrieved June 13, 2018.
  6. ^ Dieter Zimmerling, The Hanseatic League: Trading Power under the Sign of the Cog (Heyne, 1978)
  7. ^ Werner Scheltjens, North Eurasian Trade in World History, 1660–1860: The Economic and Political Importance of the Baltic Sea (Taylor & Francis, 2021)
  8. ^ "History of the University of Innsbruck", University of Innsbruck website
  9. ^ Jadunath Sarkar, ed., Maasir-i-Alamgiri: A History Of Emperor Aurangzeb by Saqi Mustaid Khan (Longmans, Green and Company, 1947) p. 60
  10. ^ Weeks, Mary Elvira (1932). "The discovery of the elements. II. Elements known to the alchemists". Journal of Chemical Education. 9 (1): 11. Bibcode:1932JChEd...9...11W. doi:10.1021/ed009p11.
  11. ^ Schiavone, Michael J. (2009). Dictionary of Maltese Biographies Vol. 1 A–F. Pietà: Pubblikazzjonijiet Indipendenza. p. 755. ISBN 9789993291329.