Portal:Money

The Money Portal

Euro coins and banknotes
A sample picture of a fictional ATM card. The largest part of the world's money exists only as accounting numbers which are transferred between financial computers. Various plastic cards and other devices give individual consumers the power to electronically transfer such money to and from their bank accounts, without the use of currency.

Money is any item or verifiable record that is generally accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts, such as taxes, in a particular country or socio-economic context. The main functions of money are distinguished as: a medium of exchange, a unit of account, a store of value and sometimes, a standard of deferred payment. Any item or verifiable record that fulfils these functions can be considered as money.

Money is historically an emergent market phenomenon establishing a commodity money, but nearly all contemporary money systems are based on fiat money. Fiat money, like any check or note of debt, is without use value as a physical commodity. It derives its value by being declared by a government to be legal tender; that is, it must be accepted as a form of payment within the boundaries of the country, for "all debts, public and private".[better source needed] Counterfeit money can cause good money to lose its value.

The money supply of a country consists of currency (banknotes and coins) and, depending on the particular definition used, one or more types of bank money (the balances held in checking accounts, savings accounts, and other types of bank accounts). Bank money, which consists only of records (mostly computerized in modern banking), forms by far the largest part of broad money in developed countries. (Full article...)

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Black and white photo of a cameo of an aging man, facing left, with receding long curly hair
Cameo of Pistrucci (ca. 1850, by his daughter, Elisa)

Benedetto Pistrucci (29 May 1783 – 16 September 1855) was an Italian gem-engraver, medallist and coin engraver, probably best known for his Saint George and the Dragon design for the British sovereign coin. Pistrucci was commissioned by the British government to create the large Waterloo Medal, a project which took him thirty years to complete.

Born in Rome in 1783, Pistrucci studied briefly with other artists before striking out on his own at age 15. He became prominent as a cameo carver and was patronised by royalty. In 1815, he moved to Britain, where he would live for most of the rest of his life. His talent brought him to the attention of notables including William Wellesley-Pole, the Master of the Mint. Pole engaged Pistrucci to design new coinage, including the sovereign, which was first issued in 1817 to mixed reactions. Although Pole probably promised Pistrucci the post of Chief Engraver, the position could not be awarded as only a British subject could hold it. This slight became a long-term grievance for Pistrucci. (Full article...)
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1943D Mercury Dime obverse-cutout.png

The Mercury dime is a ten-cent coin struck by the United States Mint from late 1916 to 1945. Designed by Adolph Weinman and also referred to as the Winged Liberty Head dime, it gained its common name because the obverse depiction of a young Liberty, identifiable by her winged Phrygian cap, was confused with the Roman god Mercury. Weinman is believed to have used Elsie Stevens, the wife of lawyer and poet Wallace Stevens, as a model. The coin's reverse depicts a fasces, symbolizing unity and strength, and an olive branch, signifying peace.

By 1916, the dime, quarter, and half dollar designed by Mint Chief Engraver Charles E. Barber had been struck for 25 years, and could be replaced by the Treasury, of which the Mint is a part, without Congressional authorization. Mint officials were under the misapprehension that the designs had to be changed, and held a competition among three sculptors, in which Barber, who had been in his position for 36 years, also took part. Weinman's designs for the dime and half dollar were selected. (Full article...)

Did you know - show different entries

  • ... that the fashionable hula master ʻIoane ʻŪkēkē was mistaken for a prince in his prime but ended his days blind and begging for money on the streets of Honolulu?
  • ... that after moving to the Canary Islands in 1992, future politician Luc André Diouf ran out of money and was homeless for 42 days?
  • ... that while in many countries the government cannot finance its deficit by creating new money, it may still borrow from the central bank, which can?
  • ... that the Florida shuffle refers to recovering drug addicts caught between multiple rehab centers and "patient brokers" for their insurance money?
  • ... that 75 business leaders, pastors, and listeners of Nevada's KRCV radio attempted to buy the station, even though it was not making money?
  • ... that Grace Buxner said when the developers of Superhot noticed her "cool frog game, they were like 'hmmm... what if..... money?????'"

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In the news

2 June 2021 –
Nicaraguan opposition figure Cristiana Chamorro Barrios is placed under house arrest in Managua as the government accuses her of money laundering. (Bangkok Post)
26 May 2021 –
Former South African President Jacob Zuma pleads not guilty to multiple charges, including corruption, fraud, racketeering and money laundering, relating to a $2 billion arms deal in 1999. Zuma said that the charges were politically motivated by a rival section of the ruling African National Congress. (Reuters)
20 May 2021 – Colonial Pipeline cyberattack‎
In the aftermath of the attack, it is revealed at a Senate Armed Services cyber subcommittee hearing that the Department of Homeland Security was not alerted to the ransomware attack and that the Justice Department was not alerted to the ransom type or the amount of money demanded, prompting discussion about the numerous information silos in the government and difficulties of information-sharing between them. (USNI News)
2 May 2021 – Iran–United States relations, Iran–United Kingdom relations
The United States denies the claim that it had agreed to exchange either prisoners or money with Iran. The United Kingdom likewise denies that any definitive decision has been made in the case of Zaghari-Ratcliffe's repatriation. (AP)

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