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Eurozone participation
European Union (EU) member states
  19 in the eurozone.
  7 not in ERM II, but obliged to join the eurozone on meeting convergence criteria (Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and Sweden).
  1 in ERM II, with an opt-out (Denmark).
  1 not in ERM II with an opt-out (United Kingdom).
Non-EU member states
  4 using the euro with a monetary agreement (Andorra, Monaco, San Marino, and Vatican City).
  2 using the euro unilaterally (Kosovo[a] and Montenegro).

Sammarinese euro coins feature separate designs for every coin. All the coins are inscribed with the words "San Marino" and the twelve stars of the EU. The Sammarinese euro coins are minted by Istituto Poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato (IPZS), in Rome, Italy.

Contents

First Sammarinese euro design (2002-2016)Edit

For images of the common side and a detailed description of the coins, see euro coins.

Depiction of Sammarinese euro coinage | Obverse side
€ 0.01 € 0.02 € 0.05
Third tower (Il Montale). Statue of Liberty (Statua della Libertà). First tower (La Guaita).
€ 0.10 € 0.20 € 0.50
Basilica of St. Marinus. Saint Marinus inspired by a painting of the school of Guercino. The Three Towers of San Marino (La Guaita, La Cesta, Il Montale).
€ 1.00 € 2.00 € 2 Coin Edge
  for a total of 12 stars
Coat of arms of the Republic of San Marino. Government Building (Palazzo Pubblico).

Second Sanmarinese euro design (2017-)Edit

Depiction of Sammarinese euro coinage | Obverse side
€ 0.01 € 0.02 € 0.05
The Coat of arms of the Republic of San Marino. San Marino's city gate. Church of Saint Quirinus.
€ 0.10 € 0.20 € 0.50
Chiesa di San Francesco (Church of Saint Francis). Mount Titano (Monte Titano) and the three towers. Detail from the portrait of San Marino by late 19th century artist Emilio Retrosi.
€ 1.00 € 2.00 € 2 Coin Edge
  for a total of 12 stars
La Cesta, the second tower from a group of towers located on the three peaks of Mount Titano (Monte Titano) in the city of San Marino, the capital of the Republic. Detail from the painting The Portrait of San Marino by Giovanni Battista Urbinelli.

Circulating mintage quantitiesEdit

The following table shows the mintage quantity for all San Marino euro coins, per denomination, per year.[1]

Face Value €0,01 €0,02 €0,05 €0,10 €0,20 €0,50 €1,00 €2,00
2002 115 000 115 000 115 000 115 000 302 400 230 400 360 800 255 760
2003 70 000 70 000 70 000 70 000 430 000 415 800 70 000 70 000
2004 1 570 000 1 465 000 1 070 000 250 000 70 000 70 000 250 000 70 000
2005 70 000 210 000 70 000 70 000 370 000 249 712 70 000 210 000
2006 2 800 000 2 800 000 2 950 000 70 000 70 000 413 880 220 000 190 000
2007 70 000 70 000 70 000 220 000 220 000 390 000 70 000 220 000
2008 63 000 63 000 63 000 63 000 1 231 360 1 413 000 63 000 63 000
2009 63 000 63 000 63 000 63 000 63 000 63 000 1 159 672 63 000
2010 56 600 56 600 56 600 186 600 56 600 56 600 1 052 734 186 600
2011 55 500 55 500 55 500 55 500 55 500 55 500 55 500 717 431
2012 85 000 85 000 85 000 85 000 85 000 125 000 95 000 712 249
2013 50 000 50 000 50 000 90 000 170 000 182 000 506 205 642 624
2014 39 000 39 000 39 000 39 000 39 000 762 275 1 556 500 39 000
2015 34 400 34 400 34 400 34 400 84 400 784 401 1 710 000 34 400
2016 30 400 30 400 30 400 30 400 230 400 30 400 30 400 904 467
2017 38 600 38 600 38 600 38 600 1 366 615 38 600 538 600 638 600
2018 37 600 27 600 37 600 27 600 627 600 1 127 600 1 127 600 37 600
Bold - Small quantities minted for sets only.

Commemorative coinsEdit

The Republic, just like the other European states who have the right to issue euro coins, issues commemorative coins, of which the most notorious denomination is €2. The Republic has also issued commemorative euro coins in other denominations, such as the 2014 €5 coin dedicated to three-time Formula One World Champion Ayrton Senna in 2014, being 20 years from Senna's fatal crash at the San Marino Grand Prix. This coin was also complemented by a commemorative €2.50 stamp.[2]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Kosovo is the subject of a territorial dispute between the Republic of Kosovo and the Republic of Serbia. The Republic of Kosovo unilaterally declared independence on 17 February 2008, but Serbia continues to claim it as part of its own sovereign territory. The two governments began to normalise relations in 2013, as part of the 2013 Brussels Agreement. Kosovo has been recognized as an independent state by 112 out of 193 United Nations member states, while 10 states have recognized Kosovo only to later withdraw their recognition.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Mintage quantities of the euro coins". Euro-Coins.Info. Retrieved 2018-11-13.
  2. ^ "VENT'ANNI SENZA IL GRANDE AYRTON SENNA". Il Giornale della Numistica. 12 August 2014. Retrieved 14 May 2015.

External linksEdit