Portal:Numismatics

The Numismatics Portal

Electrum coin from Ephesus, 520-500 BCE. Obverse: Forepart of stag. Reverse: Square incuse punch

Numismatics is the study or collection of currency, including coins, tokens, paper money, medals and related objects.

Specialists, known as numismatists, are often characterized as students or collectors of coins, but the discipline also includes the broader study of money and other means of payment used to resolve debts and exchange goods.

The earliest forms of money used by peoples is referred to as "Odd and Curious", but the use of other goods in barter exchange is excluded, even where used as a circulating currency (e.g., cigarettes in prison). As an example, the Kyrgyz people used horses as the principal currency unit, and gave small change in lambskins; the lambskins may be suitable for numismatic study, but the horses are not. Many objects have been used for centuries, such as cowry shells, precious metals, cocoa beans, large stones, and gems. (Full article...)

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5th-century gold coin of King Ezana.

Aksumite currency was coinage produced and used within the Kingdom of Aksum (or Axum) centered in present-day Eritrea and Ethiopia. Its mintages were issued and circulated from the reign of King Endubis around AD 270 until it began its decline in the first half of the 7th century. During the succeeding medieval period, Mogadishu currency, minted by the Sultanate of Mogadishu, was the most widely circulated currency in the Horn of Africa.

Aksum's currency served as a vessel of propaganda demonstrating the kingdom's wealth and promoting the national religion (first polytheistic and later Oriental Christianity). It also facilitated the Red Sea trade on which it thrived. The coinage has also proved invaluable in providing a reliable chronology of Aksumite kings due to the lack of extensive archaeological work in the area. (Full article...)
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2006-01-15 coin on water.jpg
Credit: commons:User:Roger McLassus.
A 1 Hungarian pengő coin, made of aluminium, floating on water, demonstrating its surface tension.

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Newfoundland 2 dollar coin

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The Thailand one-satang coin is a currency unit equivalent to one-hundredth of a Thai baht. It is rare in circulation but used in banking transactions.

The first satang coin was issued from 1908 to 1937, and featured a hole through the middle. It was made of bronze and measured 22mm in diameter, weighing 4.6g. It bore the name of King Rama VI. A coin in the same design was minted in 1939 with name of King Rama VIII, and had a mintage of 24.4 million. In 1941 the design of the coin changed, although it was still bronze with a hole. The diameter changed to 20mm and the weight to 3.5g. (Full article...)

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Banknote 1000 rubles (1997) back.jpg
Credit: [1]
Back of Russian 1000 rubles banknote, 1997.

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Numismatic terminology

  • Bullion – Precious metals (platinum, gold and silver) in the form of bars, ingots or plate.
  • Error – Usually a mis-made coin not intended for circulation, but can also refer to an engraving or die-cutting error not discovered until the coins are released to circulation. This may result is two or more varieties of the coin in the same year.
  • Exonumia – The study of coin-like objects such as token coins and medals, and other items used in place of legal currency or for commemoration.
  • Fineness – Purity of precious metal content expressed in terms of one thousand parts. 90% is expressed as .900 fine.
  • Notaphily – The study of paper money or banknotes.
  • Scripophily – The study and collection of stocks and Bonds.

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Central banks • Currencies • Circulating currencies • Historical currencies • US community currencies • Canadian community currencies • Mints • Motifs on banknotes • Most expensive coins

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Most traded currencies

Most traded currencies by value
Currency distribution of global foreign exchange market turnover[1]
Rank Currency ISO 4217 code
(symbol)
% of daily trades
(bought or sold)
(April 2019)
1
United States dollar
USD (US$)
88.3%
2
Euro
EUR (€)
32.3%
3
Japanese yen
JPY (¥)
16.8%
4
Pound sterling
GBP (£)
12.8%
5
Australian dollar
AUD (A$)
6.8%
6
Canadian dollar
CAD (C$)
5.0%
7
Swiss franc
CHF (CHF)
5.0%
8
Renminbi
CNY (元 / ¥)
4.3%
9
Hong Kong dollar
HKD (HK$)
3.5%
10
New Zealand dollar
NZD (NZ$)
2.1%
11
Swedish krona
SEK (kr)
2.0%
12
South Korean won
KRW (₩)
2.0%
13
Singapore dollar
SGD (S$)
1.8%
14
Norwegian krone
NOK (kr)
1.8%
15
Mexican peso
MXN ($)
1.7%
16
Indian rupee
INR (₹)
1.7%
17
Russian ruble
RUB (₽)
1.1%
18
South African rand
ZAR (R)
1.1%
19
Turkish lira
TRY (₺)
1.1%
20
Brazilian real
BRL (R$)
1.1%
21
New Taiwan dollar
TWD (NT$)
0.9%
22
Danish krone
DKK (kr)
0.6%
23
Polish złoty
PLN (zł)
0.6%
24
Thai baht
THB (฿)
0.5%
25
Indonesian rupiah
IDR (Rp)
0.4%
26
Hungarian forint
HUF (Ft)
0.4%
27
Czech koruna
CZK (Kč)
0.4%
28
Israeli new shekel
ILS (₪)
0.3%
29
Chilean peso
CLP (CLP$)
0.3%
30
Philippine peso
PHP (₱)
0.3%
31
UAE dirham
AED (د.إ)
0.2%
32
Colombian peso
COP (COL$)
0.2%
33
Saudi riyal
SAR (﷼)
0.2%
34
Malaysian ringgit
MYR (RM)
0.1%
35
Romanian leu
RON (L)
0.1%
Other 2.2%
Total[note 1] 200.0%

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  1. ^ The total sum is 200% because each currency trade always involves a currency pair; one currency is sold (e.g. US$) and another bought (€). Therefore each trade is counted twice, once under the sold currency ($) and once under the bought currency (€). The percentages above are the percent of trades involving that currency regardless of whether it is bought or sold, e.g. the U.S. Dollar is bought or sold in 88% of all trades, whereas the Euro is bought or sold 32% of the time.
  1. ^ "Triennial Central Bank Survey Foreign exchange turnover in April 2019" (PDF). Bank for International Settlements. 16 September 2019. p. 10. Retrieved 2019-09-16.

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