The 1170s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1170, and ended on December 31, 1179.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

EventsEdit

1170

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
  • Winter – An Egyptian army led by Saladin invades Palestina and besiege Darum on the Mediterranean coast. Its defenses are weak, and though Saladin has no siege-engines with him, its fall seems imminent. King Amalric I withdraws his Templar garrison from Gaza to assist him in defending Darum. Saladin raises the siege and marches on Gaza – where he captures the lower town (despite the stiff resistance ordered by Lord Miles of Plancy) and massacres the inhabitants. But the citadel is too strong for Saladin and he is forced to retreat back to Egypt.[1]
  • Saladin sends an Egyptian squadron up the Gulf of Akaba, which captures the Crusader outpost of Aila, at the head of the Gulf.[2]
EnglandEdit
IrelandEdit
AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

FolkloreEdit
ReligionEdit

1171Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
  • March 12 – Emperor Manuel I (Komnenos) orders the arrest of all Venetians in his empire, and seizes their ships and goods. In September, Doge Vitale II Michiel leads a Venetian fleet (120 ships) against the Byzantines, conquering the cities of Trogir and Dubrovnik. But the plague takes a heavy toll among the fleet's crewman, half the ships have to be burned to keep them from falling into enemy hands. A plague also breaks out in Venice when the remaining ships return.
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
  • July – King Henry II decides to lead a military expedition to Ireland and summons Richard de Clare (Strongbow) to join forces. In September, Richard travels to England and promises his loyalty to Henry. He is granted Leinster as a fiefdom and is honored with the post of "royal constable in Ireland". The army is assembled at Pembroke – several siege towers are shipped over, should Henry need to assault the Norman-held towns (or others such as Cork and Limerick).[9]
  • October 17 – Henry II invades Ireland and lands with a large army of at least 500 mounted knights, and 4,000 men and archers at Waterford. Henry commandeers merchant ships as part of his invasion.[10] He claims the ports of Dublin, Waterford, and Wexford, and promises the Irish chieftains protection if they will acknowledge him as their overlord. Henry is recognized as "Lord of Ireland", traders are invited to Dublin where an English colony is set up.[10]
  • Ascall mac Ragnaill (or Torcaill), last Norse–Gaelic king of Dublin, is captured while trying to retake Dublin from the English forces under Richard de Clare, perhaps in company with Sweyn Asleifsson, and is beheaded. Before the end of the year, Richard relinquishes possession of the city to Henry II, who converts it into an English royal town.
LevantEdit
EgyptEdit
AsiaEdit
  • Yesugei (Baghatur), Mongol chieftain, arranges a marriage between his 9-year-old son Temujin (Genghis Khan) and the daughter of the chief of a nearby clan, Börte. He is poisoned by the Tatars while sharing a meal during the wedding.[12]

1172Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
  • King Henry II and Humbert III (the Blessed), agree to wed their respective heirs, John and Alicia. The alliance never occurs because Henry's elder heir, Henry the Young King, becomes jealous over the castles in the realm which Henry has promised to the couple. He stages a rebellion which will take Henry two years to put down. By that time, Alicia has died.[15]
  • April 17 – Henry II receives homage from the Irish princess who include Domnall Mór Ua Briain, king of Munster. He grants Hugh de Lacy the lordship of Meath (or Mide) for providing the services of 50 knights.[16]
EgyptEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1173Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
EgyptEdit
ChinaEdit
  • The Qiandao era ends and the Chunxi era begins during the reign of Emperor Xiao Zong of the Song Dynasty.

By topicEdit

Art and LeisureEdit
AgricultureEdit
ReligionEdit

1174Edit

By placeEdit

EnglandEdit
EuropeEdit
LevantEdit
EgyptEdit
  • July 25 – The Sicilian fleet (some 250 ships) under Admiral Tancred launches a failed attack against Alexandria. But he is deprived of support and forced to sail away after a seven-days blockade on August 1.[28]
  • Saladin sends his brother Turan-Shah with an army and supporting fleet to conquer Yemen. This to consolidate Muslim control over the Red Sea while protecting the pilgrimage route from Egypt to Mecca.[29]
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1175Edit

By placeEdit

EnglandEdit
EuropeEdit
LevantEdit
  • May 22 – A group of Isma'ili Assassins gains access into Saladin's camp and attempts to kill him during the siege of Aleppo. But his bodyguard saves his life, the others are slain while trying to escape.[34]
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1176Edit

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
  • Summer – Emperor Manuel I (Komnenos) assembles a Byzantine expeditionary force and marches towards Iconium the Seljuk capital. Meanwhile, hordes of Seljuk Turks destroy crops and poison water supplies, to make Manuel's march more difficult, and harass the Byzantine army in order to force it into the Meander valley. Kilij Arslan II, ruler of the Sultanate of Rum, hears of the expedition and sends envoys to ask for peace.[37]
  • September 17Battle of Myriokephalon: The Seljuk Turks defeat the Byzantine forces led by Manuel I, who are ambushed when moving through a narrow mountain pass near Lake Beyşehir. The Byzantines are dispersed and surrounded. They suffer heavy casualties and their siege equipment is destroyed. Manuel flees in panic and is forced to sign a peace treaty with Kilij Arslan II.[38]
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
EgyptEdit
  • Al-Adil I, Ayyubid governor of Egypt, suppresses a revolt by the Christian Copts in the city of Qift, hanging nearly 3,000 of them on the trees near the city.
LevantEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1177Edit

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1178Edit

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

Art and ScienceEdit
ReligionEdit

1179Edit

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AfricaEdit
  • September 17 – A large offensive, by the Almohad army led by Yusuf I in southern Portugal, aims at the reconquest of the Alentejo.[73] Further north, an Almohad fleet sails to attack Lisbon, but is repelled by the Portuguese, near the Cape Espichel.[73] The Portuguese fleet later manages to enter in the harbor of Ceuta, and destroy a number of Muslim ships. It is the beginning of a four-year naval conflict between the Almohads and Portuguese.
AsiaEdit
  • Taira no Kiyomori, Japanese military leader, confines the former Emperor Go-Shirakawa to his quarters after discovering that he has tried to confiscate the estates of Kiyomori's deceased children.
MesoamericaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

1170

1171

1172

1173

1174

1175

1176

1177

1178

1179

DeathsEdit

1170

1171

1172

1173

1174

1175

1176

1177

1178

1179


ReferencesEdit

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