Portal:Hungary

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Hungary (Hungarian: Magyarország [ˈmɔɟɔrorsaːɡ] (About this soundlisten)) is a country in Central Europe. Spanning 93,030 square kilometres (35,920 sq mi) in the Carpathian Basin, it borders Slovakia to the north, Ukraine to the northeast, Romania to the east and southeast, Serbia to the south, Croatia and Slovenia to the southwest, and Austria to the west. With about 10 million inhabitants, Hungary is a medium-sized member state of the European Union. The official language is Hungarian, which is the most widely spoken Uralic language in the world, and among the few non-Indo-European languages to be widely spoken in Europe. Hungary's capital and largest city is Budapest; other major urban areas include Debrecen, Szeged, Miskolc, Pécs, and Győr.

The territory of present Hungary was for centuries inhabited by a succession of peoples, including Celts, Romans, Germanic tribes, Huns, West Slavs and the Avars. The foundations of the Hungarian state were established in the late ninth century AD by the Hungarian grand prince Árpád following the conquest of the Carpathian Basin. His great-grandson Stephen I ascended the throne in 1000, converting his realm to a Christian kingdom. By the 12th century, Hungary became a regional power, reaching its cultural and political height in the 15th century. Following the Battle of Mohács in 1526, Hungary was partially occupied by the Ottoman Empire (1541–1699). The country came under Habsburg rule entirely at the turn of the 18th century, and later joined Austria to form the Austro–Hungarian Empire, a major European power.

The Austro-Hungarian Empire collapsed after World War I, and the subsequent Treaty of Trianon established Hungary's current borders, resulting in the loss of 71% of its territory, 58% of its population, and 32% of ethnic Hungarians. Following the tumultuous interwar period, Hungary joined the Axis Powers in World War II, suffering significant damage and casualties. Postwar Hungary became a satellite state of the Soviet Union, which contributed to the establishment of a socialist republic spanning four decades (1949–1989). Following the failed 1956 revolution against the Soviet-backed government, Hungary became a comparatively freer, though still repressive, member of the Eastern Bloc. The seminal opening of the previously-restricted border with Austria in 1989 accelerated the collapse of the Eastern Bloc, and subsequently the Soviet Union. On 23 October 1989, Hungary became a democratic parliamentary republic.

Hungary is an OECD high-income economy, and has the world's 54th-largest economy by nominal GDP, and the 53rd-largest by PPP. It ranks 45th on the Human Development Index, due in large part to its social security system, universal health care, and tuition-free secondary education. Hungary's rich cultural history includes significant contributions to the arts, music, literature, sports, science and technology. It is the thirteenth-most popular tourist destination in Europe, drawing 15.8 million international tourists in 2017, owing to attractions such as the largest thermal water cave system in the world, second largest thermal lake, the largest lake in Central Europe and the largest natural grasslands in Europe.

Hungary's cultural, historical, and academic prominence classify it as a middle power in global affairs. Hungary joined the European Union in 2004 and has been part of the Schengen Area since 2007. It is a member of numerous international organizations, including the United Nations, NATO, WTO, World Bank, IIB, the AIIB, the Council of Europe, and the Visegrád Group. Read more...

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Joseph Szigeti

Joseph Szigeti (Hungarian: Szigeti József, [ˈjoːʒɛf ˈsiɡɛti]; 5 September 1892 – 19 February 1973) was a Hungarian violinist.

Born into a musical family, he spent his early childhood in a small town in Transylvania. He quickly proved himself to be a child prodigy on the violin, and moved to Budapest with his father to study with the renowned pedagogue Jenő Hubay. After completing his studies with Hubay in his early teens, Szigeti began his international concert career. His performances at that time were primarily limited to salon-style recitals and the more overtly virtuosic repertoire; however, after making the acquaintance of pianist Ferruccio Busoni, he began to develop a much more thoughtful and intellectual approach to music that eventually earned him the nickname "The Scholarly Virtuoso". Read more...

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házi húsleves — lit. "house meatsoup"
Hungarian or Magyar cuisine is the cuisine characteristic of the nation of Hungary and its primary ethnic group, the Magyars. Traditional Hungarian dishes are primarily based on meats, seasonal vegetables, fruits, fresh bread, dairy products and cheeses. Read more...

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  • Musicians

Béla BartókJános BihariErnő DohnányiBéni EgressyFerenc ErkelZoltán KocsisZoltán KodályFranz Liszt - Eugene Ormandy - George Szell - András Schiff

  • Painters

Gyula BenczúrTivadar Csontváry KosztkaBéla CzóbelÁrpád FesztyKároly LotzViktor MadarászMihály MunkácsyJózsef Rippl-RónaiPál Szinyei MerseIstván SzőnyiVictor Vasarely

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BrassaïCornell CapaRobert CapaLucien HervéAndré KertészLászló Moholy-NagyMartin Munkácsi

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Béla H. BánáthyZoltán BayGeorg von BékésyFarkas BolyaiJános BolyaiKároly BundJózsef EötvösLoránd EötvösDennis GaborJohn Charles HarsanyiGeorge de HevesyAlexander Csoma de KőrösLászló LovászJohn von NeumannGeorge Andrew OlahErnő RubikHans SelyeIgnaz SemmelweisCharles SimonyiJános SzentágothaiAlbert Szent-GyörgyiLeó SzilárdEdward TellerEugene Wigner

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Endre AdyJános AranyJózsef EötvösGyörgy FaludyBéla HamvasMór JókaiAttila JózsefFerenc KazinczyImre KertészJános KodolányiFerenc KölcseyImre MadáchSándor MáraiFerenc MolnárSándor PetőfiMiklós RadnótiMagda SzabóAntal SzerbMiklós VámosMihály Vörösmarty

  • Statesmen, Politicians and Military

Gyula AndrássyLajos BatthyányGabriel BethlenStephen BocskayMatthias CorvinusFerenc DeákMiklós HorthyLajos KossuthFerenc NagyImre NagyBertalan SzemereIstván SzéchenyiMiklós WesselényiVilmos Nagy of Nagybaczon

  • Sportspeople

József BozsikKrisztina EgerszegiZoltán GeraDezső GyarmatiÁgnes KeletiPéter LékóCsaba MérőTibor NyilasiLászló PappJudit PolgárZsuzsa PolgárFerenc Puskás

  • Film & Stage

Nimród AntalMichael CurtizJohn GarfieldMiklós JancsóSir Alexander KordaPeter LorreBéla LugosiEmeric PressburgerMiklós RózsaAndy G. VajnaGábor Zsazsa

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Szilágyi coat of arms
Justina Szilágyi de Horogszeg (Hungarian: horogszegi Szilágyi Jusztina; before 1455 – 1497) was a Hungarian noblewoman, who became the second wife of Vlad the Impaler, Voivode of Wallachia. She was the daughter of Ladislaus or Osvát Szilágyi and thus a cousin of Matthias Corvinus, King of Hungary. Corvinus first gave her in marriage to Wenceslas Pongrác of Szentmiklós. Pongrác had inherited estates in Upper Hungary (present-day Slovakia), but was forced to renounce them in exchange for landed property he and Justina jointly received in Transylvania following their marriage. After Pongrác died in 1474, the widowed Justina married Vlad, whom Corvinus acknowledged as the lawful voivode of Wallachia in 1475. Vlad seized Wallachia in late 1476, but soon died in battle. To strengthen her claim to her Transylvanian estates, she married Paul Suki, who was related to the former owners of those territories. After the death of Suki, in 1479, Justina was married to John Erdélyi of Somkerék, until her death in 1497. Read more...

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