Eurovision Song Contest 2023

The Eurovision Song Contest 2023 was the 67th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Liverpool, United Kingdom, as Ukraine—the winner of the 2022 contest with the song "Stefania" by Kalush Orchestra—was unable to host the event due to the Russian invasion of the country. It was organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), with the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) acting as host broadcaster on behalf of the Public Broadcasting Company of Ukraine (UA:PBC). The contest was held at Liverpool Arena, and consisted of two semi-finals on 9 and 11 May and a final on 13 May 2023. The three live shows were presented by British singer Alesha Dixon, British actress Hannah Waddingham, and Ukrainian singer Julia Sanina, with Irish television presenter Graham Norton joining for the final.

Eurovision Song Contest 2023
United by Music
Eurovision Song Contest 2023 logo
Dates
Semi-final 19 May 2023
Semi-final 211 May 2023
Final13 May 2023
Host
VenueLiverpool Arena
Liverpool, United Kingdom
Presenter(s)
Directed by
  • Nikki Parsons
  • Richard Valentine
  • Ollie Bartlett
Executive supervisorMartin Österdahl
Executive producerAndrew Cartmell
Host broadcasterBritish Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/liverpool-2023 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries37
Number of finalists26
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countriesNone
Non-returning countries
  • A coloured map of the countries of EuropePortugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023San Marino in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023France in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Estonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Latvia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Lithuania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Slovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestAustria in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Hungary in the Eurovision Song ContestCroatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song ContestMontenegro in the Eurovision Song ContestSerbia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Albania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023North Macedonia in the Eurovision Song ContestGreece in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Bulgaria in the Eurovision Song ContestRomania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Moldova in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Ukraine in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Belarus in the Eurovision Song ContestAustralia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Russia in the Eurovision Song ContestGeorgia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Azerbaijan in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Turkey in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Armenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestLiechtenstein in the Eurovision Song ContestAndorra in the Eurovision Song ContestMonaco in the Eurovision Song ContestPoland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Czech Republic in the Eurovision Song Contest 2023Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestLebanon in the Eurovision Song ContestTunisia in the Eurovision Song Contest
         Finalist countries     Countries eliminated in the semi-finals     Countries that participated in the past but not in 2023
Vote
Voting systemEach country awards one set in the semi-finals, or two sets in the final of 12, 10, 8–1 points to ten songs.
In all three shows, online votes from viewers in non-participating countries are aggregated and awarded as one set of points.
Winning song Sweden
"Tattoo"
2022 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 2024

Thirty-seven countries participated in the contest, with Bulgaria, Montenegro, and North Macedonia ceasing their participation, mainly due to the economic impact of the global energy crisis.[1][2]

The winner was Sweden with the song "Tattoo", performed by Loreen and written by her along with Jimmy Thörnfeldt, Jimmy Jansson, Moa Carlebecker, Peter Boström, and Thomas G:son. Finland, Israel, Italy, and Norway rounded out the top five. Sweden won the combined vote and jury vote, and came second to Finland in the televote. Loreen became the second performer to win the contest twice, after Irish singer Johnny Logan; it was also the seventh win for Sweden, tying Ireland's record for the most Eurovision victories.

The EBU reported that the contest had a television audience of 162 million viewers in 38 European markets, an increase of a million viewers from the previous edition. A total of 15.6 million viewers watched the contest online on YouTube and TikTok.[3][4]

Location edit

 
Liverpool Arena – host venue of the 2023 contest
 
St George's Hall – host venue for the allocation draw and the opening ceremony of the 2023 contest
 
Location of host venue (red) and other contest-related sites and events (blue)

The 2023 contest was held in Liverpool, United Kingdom. It was the ninth time that the United Kingdom had hosted the contest, having previously done so for winning the previous year in 1968, 1977, 1982, and 1998, and in place of the previous year's winning country in 1960, 1963, 1972, and 1974.[5][6] The selected venue was the 11,000-seat Liverpool Arena, a multi-purpose indoor arena located in the ACC Liverpool complex.[7] The "Turquoise Carpet" event, where the contestants and their delegations were presented before accredited press and fans, took place outside the Walker Art Gallery on 7 May 2023, followed by the Opening Ceremony at St George's Hall.[8][9]

In conjunction with the contest, Liverpool held a cultural festival called "EuroFest", which featured collaborations between British and Ukrainian artists.[10][11][12] The Pier Head was the location of the Eurovision Village, where a stage hosted performances by Ukrainian artists, local artists, current and previous Eurovision entrants, and other groups.[13] It also held screenings of the three live shows.[14][15][16] Entry to the Village was free of charge except during the final.[17][18][19] The EuroClub, which took place at Camp and Furnace, hosted the official after-parties and private performances by contest participants.[20][21]

Host country selection edit

The 2022 contest was won by Ukraine with the song "Stefania" by Kalush Orchestra, which, according to Eurovision tradition, made Ukraine the presumptive host of the 2023 contest.[22][23] The country had hosted the contest twice before, in 2005 and 2017, both times in Kyiv. Between May and June 2022, the Ukrainian government and UA:PBC, the nation's public broadcaster, discussed hosting the contest with the EBU.[24] The chairman of UA:PBC, Mykola Chernotytskyi [uk], Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskyy, and other Ukrainian politicians expressed their willingness to host the event, and an organising committee was formed.[25][26][27][28][29]

Despite this, the EBU announced on 17 June 2022 that the Russian invasion of Ukraine meant that UA:PBC could not give the security and operations guarantees required to host the contest, and that the event could therefore not be held in Ukraine.[30] The EBU then entered discussions with the BBC, the 2022 runner-up, and on 25 July announced that the 2023 contest would be hosted in the United Kingdom.[31] It was the first time since 1980 that the contest was not hosted by the previous year's winning country.[32]

The decision not to host in Ukraine was initially met with disappointment. UA:PBC published a statement in which Chernotytskyi requested further talks with the EBU, and Oleh Psiuk of Kalush Orchestra published an open letter criticising the decision, co-signed by Ukraine's previous Eurovision winners, Ruslana and Jamala, as well as Ukraine's minister of culture Oleksandr Tkachenko.[33][34][35] This stance was supported by Boris Johnson, who was the British prime minister at the time, Nadine Dorries, who was the British culture secretary at the time, the Polish broadcaster Telewizja Polska, and Poland's deputy prime minister and minister of culture Piotr Gliński.[36][37][38][39] The announcement on 25 July that the BBC would host the contest was supported by UA:PBC.[31]

Host city bidding phase edit

Location of host city Liverpool (in blue), shortlisted city Glasgow (in yellow), longlisted cities (in green), other bidding cities (in red) and cities and towns that expressed interest but ultimately did not bid (in grey)

The host city bidding process ran from 25 July to 7 October 2022, with candidates judged against a set of criteria to demonstrate that they could host an event on the scale of the Eurovision Song Contest.[40][41] During the first stage of the process, the BBC received expressions of interest from 20 UK cities and towns, seven of which were longlisted on 12 August 2022: Birmingham, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, and Sheffield.[42] These cities had until 8 September to develop their bids in detail for evaluation by the BBC, which also conducted visits to the cities throughout the month.[43][44] On 27 September, Glasgow and Liverpool were announced to have made the shortlist,[45] and on 7 October, the EBU and the BBC announced Liverpool as the host city.[7][46]

Key:
 †  Host city  ‡  Shortlisted  *  Longlisted  ^  Submitted a bid

City/town Venue Notes Ref.
Aberdeen ^ The Event Complex Aberdeen [47]
Belfast ^ Odyssey Arena [48][49]
Birmingham * Birmingham International Arena Supported by Birmingham City Council [50]
Brighton Withdrew its proposal on 11 August 2022, citing lack of required infrastructure and venue [51][52][53][54]
Bristol ^ Bristol Arena [55]
Cardiff Millennium Stadium Withdrew its proposal on 3 August 2022, citing unavailability of the proposed venue [56][57]
Darlington ^ The Darlington Arena Proposal was dependent on the construction of a roof to cover the arena; supported by Darlington Borough Council and Tees Valley Combined Authority [58][59]
Derry Withdrew its proposal on 8 August 2022, citing lack of a suitable venue and supporting accommodation infrastructure [60][61]
Edinburgh ^ Supported by Edinburgh City Council [62]
Glasgow The Hydro Supported by Glasgow City Council [63]
Leeds * Leeds Arena Supported by Leeds City Council [64][63]
Liverpool Liverpool Arena Supported by Liverpool City Council [65][66][67][63][68]
London ^ London met the criteria but was not shortlisted, as the BBC and the British government aimed to "move events and opportunities outside the capital". [51][69][63]
Manchester * Manchester Arena Supported by Manchester City Council [70][63]
Newcastle * Newcastle Arena Supported by Newcastle City Council [71][72][63]
Nottingham Nottingham Arena Withdrew its proposal on 9 August 2022, citing the proposed venue's incapability to meet EBU requirements [73][74]
Sheffield * Sheffield Arena Supported by Sheffield City Council and South Yorkshire Mayoral Combined Authority [75][76]
Sunderland Stadium of Light Withdrew its proposal on 10 August 2022, citing unavailability of the proposed venue [77][78][79]
Wolverhampton [48]

Participating countries edit

Eurovision Song Contest 2023 – Participation summaries by country

Eligibility for potential participation in the Eurovision Song Contest requires a national broadcaster with active EBU membership capable of receiving the contest via the Eurovision network and broadcasting it live nationwide. The EBU issued an invitation to participate in the contest to all active members. Associate member Australia did not need an invitation for the 2023 contest, as it had previously been granted permission to participate until at least this year.[80]

On 20 October 2022, the EBU announced that 37 countries would participate in the 2023 contest – the lowest number of participating countries in a single edition since 2014 – with Bulgaria, Montenegro and North Macedonia, which had participated in the 2022 contest, opting not to participate in 2023 for financial reasons.[81] This was also the first contest where the Czech Republic participated under its shortened English name of Czechia.[82][83]

Returning artists edit

The contest featured four representatives who also previously performed as lead vocalists for the same country. Two of them had competed in 2012: Loreen won that year's contest representing Sweden,[122] while Pasha Parfeni represented Moldova that year and later provided backing vocals for Aliona Moon in 2013.[123] Also returning as lead artists were Marco Mengoni, who had represented Italy in 2013,[124] and Monika Linkytė, who had represented Lithuania in 2015 alongside Vaidas Baumila.[125] In addition, Belgium's Gustaph had previously provided backing vocals for Sennek in 2018 and Hooverphonic in 2021,[126] and Georgia's Iru had won the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2011 as a member of Candy.[127]

Other countries edit

Several EBU member broadcasters made statements confirming non-participation prior to the publication of the official 2023 participants list. The management board of Bulgarian broadcaster BNT, at a meeting on 7 September 2022, decided not to participate in the 2023 contest, citing an expected increase in participation fees;[128] this was later publicly confirmed in several Bulgarian news outlets on 19 October.[129][130] The Montenegrin broadcaster RTCG and the Macedonian broadcaster MRT also publicly confirmed on 13 and 14 October 2022 respectively that they would not participate in the contest, citing financial contraints.[131][132][133] Both RTCG and MRT however confirmed their intentions to broadcast the 2023 contest.[134][135] Active EBU member broadcasters in Andorra, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Luxembourg and Slovakia also confirmed non-participation prior to the announcement of the participants list by the EBU.[136][137][138][139]

A potential return for Monaco to the contest in 2023 – in what would have been its first participation since 2006 – was first discussed in November 2021, when it was reported that part of the Monégasque state budget had been reserved for participation in the 2023 contest.[140] However, these plans were curtailed due to the delay in the launch of a new Monégasque public television channel, TVMonaco, which commenced broadcasts in September 2023 instead of the initially outlined period of late 2022.[141][142] Monaco Media Diffusion, the current EBU member broadcaster for Monaco, subsequently confirmed on 5 September 2022 that the country would not participate in the 2023 event.[143]

Discussions were also reported between the EBU and Kazakh broadcaster Khabar Agency, an associate member of the EBU, which would have led to Kazakhstan being invited to participate in the contest for the first time. Kazakhstan has participated in the Junior Eurovision Song Contest since 2018, with television producer Zhan Mukanov stating that "there is every chance [for Kazakhstan] to enter the adult Eurovision next year" and that the country's participation in the 2022 Junior contest would have a "significant impact" on its chances of debuting in the adult event.[144] The country, however, did not appear on the final list of participants.[81]

Production edit

 
Exterior of the Liverpool Arena during the Eurovision event weeks

The Eurovision Song Contest 2023 was produced by the British national broadcaster British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The Ukrainian public broadcaster UA:PBC worked with the BBC to develop and implement Ukrainian elements for the live shows, including theme artwork, background music, selection of presenters, and opening and interval acts.[145][146] The three shows were produced by BBC Studios Entertainment Productions and BBC Studios Music Productions, part of the BBC's commercial subsidiary BBC Studios.[147]

The senior production team consisted of Martin Green as managing director, Rachel Ashdown as lead commissioner, Andrew Cartmell as executive producer, Lee Smithurst as head of show, Twan van de Nieuwenhuijzen as head of contest, and James O'Brien as executive in charge of production.[148] Additional production personnel included multi-camera directors Nikki Parsons, Richard Valentine and Ollie Bartlett, lead creative director Dan Shipton, music director Kojo Samuel, stage designer Julio Himede, head of sound Robert Edwards, and lighting designer Tim Routledge. The Ukrainian consultation team was led by Oksana Skybinska, Tetiana Semenova, and Herman Nenov [ru].[147] Background music for the shows was composed by Mykhailo Nekrasov.[149]

The budget was contributed to by Liverpool City Council and the Liverpool City Region Combined Authority (£2 million each), the British government (£10 million), and the BBC (£8 million to £17 million).[150][151] The overall budget was not made public, but was estimated to be at around £24.7 million (28.3 million), including expenditures by the host city.[152][153][154]

Visual design edit

 
The graphic design of the 2023 contest on display in Liverpool

On 7 October 2022, along with the host city announcement, the EBU revealed the generic logo for the 2023 contest.[155] The Eurovision heart, which typically has the flag of the host country placed in its centre, contained the Ukrainian flag for this year to reflect the country's win the previous year. The 'Song Contest' text was accompanied below by 'United Kingdom' and further down by 'Liverpool 2023'.[46]

The theme art and slogan for the contest, "United by Music", was unveiled on 31 January 2023.[156] Designed by London-based brand consultancy Superunion and Ukrainian production company Starlight Media, the artwork was built around a string of two-dimensional hearts resembling an electrocardiogram, representing response to rhythm and sound, while the colours were inspired by those of the Ukrainian and British flags. The typeface, Penny Lane, was inspired by 20th-century Liverpool street signs and the city's musical heritage.[157][158][159]

Stage design edit

 
The stage in the arena

The stage design for the 2023 contest was revealed on 2 February 2023.[160] Designed by New York-based set designer Julio Himede, the design was based on "the principles of togetherness, celebration and community", taking inspiration from a wide hug and the "cultural aspects and similarities between Ukraine, the UK and specifically Liverpool". The stage is 450 square metres, with 220 square metres of independently rotating LED screens, over 700 LED floor tiles and more than 1500 metres of LED lights.[161] King Charles III and Queen Camilla (whose coronations were held the week before the contest) inaugurated the stage on 26 April, during an official visit to Liverpool.[162]

Postcards edit

The "postcards" were 40-second video introductions shown on television whilst the stage is being prepared for the next entry. Filmed between February and April 2023 and directed by Tom Cook, with Carlo Massarella and Jane McGoldrick serving as executive producers, the postcards were based on the "United by Music" theme of the contest. Making use of 360° drone technology, each postcard began in a selected location in Ukraine, then one in the United Kingdom, before moving to the artist's country of origin, where the artist took part in an activity of their choice. The three locations appearing in each postcard were connected by a singular theme.[163] Each postcard was bookended with the "little planet effect", which symbolised the interconnections between people.[164] The postcards were produced by London-based production company Windfall Films and Ukrainian production company 23/32, with background music composed by Dmytro Shurov.[165][166] The following locations were used for each participating country:

Postcard locations
Country Theme Locations[167]
In Ukraine In the United Kingdom In the participating country
  Albania City parks Sofiyivka Park, Uman Sefton Park, Liverpool Grand Park of Tirana
  Armenia Botanical gardens Botanical garden, Lviv University Eden Project, Cornwall Yerevan Botanical Garden
  Australia Bridges Glass Bridge, Kyiv Clifton Suspension Bridge, Bristol Matagarup Bridge, Perth
  Austria City halls Lviv Town Hall Sheffield Town Hall Vienna City Hall
  Azerbaijan City squares Maidan Nezalezhnosti, Kyiv Centenary Square, Birmingham Baku Boulevard
  Belgium Monuments Independence Monument, Kyiv Angel of the North, Gateshead Atomium, Brussels
  Croatia Ports Kyiv River Port Whitby Harbour, North Yorkshire Port of Rijeka
  Cyprus Beaches Kyiv Sea beach Brighton Beach, East Sussex Akti Olympion Beach, Limassol
  Czechia Mazes Green Maze, Zhytomyr Peace Maze, Castlewellan Yew Maze, Loučeň Castle
  Denmark Opera houses Lviv Theatre of Opera and Ballet Wales Millennium Centre, Cardiff Copenhagen Opera House
  Estonia Towers Vinnytsia water tower Blackpool Tower, Lancashire Tallinn TV Tower
  Finland Ferris wheels Podil ferris wheel, Kyiv Wheel of Liverpool SkyWheel Helsinki
  France Palaces Potocki Palace, Lviv Hopetoun House, West Lothian Palace of Fontainebleau, Seine-et-Marne
  Georgia Old towns Old Town, Lviv Port Sunlight, Merseyside Old Town, Tbilisi
  Germany Canals Rusanivka, Kyiv Bridgewater Canal, Greater Manchester Kehrwiederfleet Canal, Hamburg
  Greece Ruins Tarakaniv Fort, Rivne Oblast region Dunluce Castle, County Antrim Temple of Poseidon, Sounion
  Iceland Waterfalls Maniava waterfall, Gorgany Pistyll Rhaeadr, Powys Kvernufoss [it], Skógar region
  Ireland Mountain roads Mountain road in Ivano-Frankivsk Oblast region Military Road, Isle of Wight Sally Gap, County Wicklow
  Israel Rock formations Urytski rocks in the Skole Beskids mountain range Stonehenge, Wiltshire Masada, Judaean Desert
  Italy Velodromes Kyiv Velodrome Pump Track Wales, Rhayader Circus Maximus, Rome
  Latvia Beach campsites Ecospace pods, Kyiv Sea Beach huts at Boscombe beach, Bournemouth Melnsils, Talsi Municipality
  Lithuania Fortresses Khotyn Fortress, Chernivtsi Oblast Eilean Donan, Scottish Highlands Trakai Island Castle
  Malta Buses Lviv autobus London red double-decker bus Vintage bus in Mellieħa
  Moldova Forests Skole Beskids Forest, Lviv Sherwood Forest, Nottinghamshire Orhei National Park, Trebujeni
  Netherlands Colourful architecture Comfort Town, Kyiv Portmeirion, Gwynedd Zaandam, North Holland
  Norway Libraries Vernadsky National Library of Ukraine Liverpool Central Library Oslo Public Library
  Poland Universities Chernivtsi University Trinity College, Cambridge Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw
  Portugal Churches St Sophia Cathedral, Kyiv Ely Cathedral, Cambridgeshire Church of Santa Engrácia, Lisbon
  Romania Statues Taras Shevchenko statue, Lviv The Beatles statue, Liverpool A Carriage with Clowns sculpture, Bucharest
  San Marino Castles Kamianets-Podilskyi Castle, Khmelnytskyi Oblast Herstmonceux Castle, East Sussex Guaita, Monte Titano
  Serbia Art galleries Park3020, Lviv region Tate Liverpool Museum of Contemporary Art, Belgrade
  Slovenia Rooftops Tetris Hall rooftop, Kyiv Goodness Gracious Roof Bar, Liverpool Radio Slovenija rooftop, Ljubljana
  Spain Theatres Amphitheater, Uzhhorod Minack Theatre, Cornwall Roman Theatre, Sagunto
  Sweden Islands Anti-Circe Island, Uman St Catherine's Island, Tenby Enholmen [sv], Gotland
   Switzerland Lakes Lake Buchak, Cherkasy Oblast Loch Ness, Scottish Highlands Lake Zurich
  Ukraine Street murals Street murals in Kyiv Street murals in Belfast Art-Zavod Platforma, Kyiv
  United Kingdom Rivers Dnieper, Kyiv River Mersey, Liverpool River Thames, London

Vocal rules edit

For the third year in a row, delegations had the option to use pre-recorded backing vocals, though each delegation could still use live backing singers—whether on or off stage—or a combination of live and recorded backing vocals. However, all lead vocals and lead dubs performing the melody of the song must still be live.[168] The contest's executive supervisor Martin Österdahl later stated that the use of pre-recorded backing vocals would continue to be permitted for the foreseeable future.[169]

Presenters edit

 
Presenters as they appeared in the final, from left to right: Alesha Dixon, Julia Sanina, Hannah Waddingham and Graham Norton

British singer Alesha Dixon, British actress Hannah Waddingham, and Ukrainian singer Julia Sanina were announced as the presenters for the 2023 contest on 22 February 2023, and they hosted all three shows of the event; Irish television presenter Graham Norton joined them for the final.[170] Norton has served as the BBC's commentator for the contest since 2009, and had previously co-hosted both editions of the Eurovision Dance Contest in 2007 and 2008, as well as Eurovision Song Contest's Greatest Hits in 2015.[171]

The "Turquoise Carpet" and Opening Ceremony events were hosted by Timur Miroshnychenko (who had co-hosted the 2017 contest) and Sam Quek, with Richie Anderson providing off-screen commentary.[172][173] Miroshnychenko also moderated the contest's press conferences, along with Jermaine Foster and Mariia Vynogradova.[174]

Format edit

Voting system and contest structure edit

 
Presenters Julia Sanina and Hannah Waddingham announcing the semi-final qualifiers. The contest's executive supervisor, Martin Österdahl, is seen in the background.

On 22 November 2022, the EBU announced changes to the voting system for the 2023 contest.[175] The results of the semi-finals would be determined solely by televoting, as was the case between 2004 and 2007,[b] while the results of the final would be determined by a combination of national juries and televoting, as has been the case since the 2009 final. In the event that a country cannot deliver a televoting result in a semi-final, a backup jury result would be used instead.[176] In the final, in the event that a country cannot deliver a televoting result, an aggregated result calculated on the basis of countries with similar voting patterns would be used.[177] If a country's jury is disqualified, the televoting points from that country would be doubled and used as a substitute for that country's jury points in the final. The procedure of using calculated points would remain as a last resort in the event that a country cannot deliver a valid jury or televoting result.[178] Viewers from non-participating countries would also be able to vote in all shows, with their votes being aggregated and presented as one individual set of points under "Rest of the World". Those viewers would be able to cast votes via an online platform, which requires ownership of a credit or debit card for verification.[179]

On 8 May 2023, a change to the semi-final qualifiers announcement format was revealed, where the acts would be on stage to anticipate the announcement of the finalists instead of sitting in the green room, similar to The X Factor.[180] This format was trialled during a dress rehearsal for the first semi-final, before being dropped on the same day due to negative responses.[181][182]

Semi-final allocation draw edit

 
Results of the semi-final allocation draw
  Participating countries in the first semi-final
  Pre-qualified for the final but also voting in the first semi-final
  Participating countries in the second semi-final
  Pre-qualified for the final but also voting in the second semi-final

The draw to determine the participating countries' semi-finals took place on 31 January 2023 at 19:00 GMT (20:00 CET), at St George's Hall.[183] The thirty-one semi-finalists were divided over five pots, based on historical voting patterns as calculated by the contest's official televoting partner Digame.[184] The purpose of drawing from different pots was to reduce the chance of "bloc voting" and to increase suspense in the semi-finals.[185] The draw also determined which semi-final each of the six automatic qualifiers – the previous year's winning country Ukraine and "Big Five" countries France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom – would broadcast and vote in. The ceremony was hosted by AJ Odudu and Rylan, and included the passing of the host city insignia from Stefano Lo Russo, the mayor of previous host city Turin, to Joanne Anderson, the mayor of Liverpool. London-based production company ModestTV was commissioned to produce the broadcast of the ceremony.[186]

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4 Pot 5

Contest overview edit

Semi-final 1 edit

 
Rita Ora performed as an interval act in the first semi-final.

The first semi-final took place on 9 May 2023 at 20:00 BST (21:00 CEST).[7][187] Fifteen countries participated in this semi-final, with the running order published on 22 March 2023.[188] Finland won the most points, followed by Sweden, Israel, Czechia, Moldova, Norway, Switzerland, Croatia, Portugal, and Serbia. The countries that failed to reach the final were Latvia, Ireland, the Netherlands, Azerbaijan, and Malta. All the countries competing in this semi-final were eligible to vote, plus France, Germany and Italy, as well as non-participating countries under an aggregated "Rest of the World" vote.[189]

This semi-final was opened by a dance sketch set to "Together in Electric Dreams", preceded by a pre-recorded segment featuring Paul Hollywood, King Charles III, Queen Camilla, Sister Sister, Ricky Tomlinson, and Paul O'Grady in a posthumous appearance.[190] This was followed by co-presenter Julia Sanina performing "Mayak" with her husband and fellow The Hardkiss member Valeriy Bebko.[191] The interval acts included Alyosha performing "Ordinary World" with Rebecca Ferguson, and Rita Ora performing a medley of "Ritual", "Anywhere", "I Will Never Let You Down" and "Praising You". The French, German, and Italian artists were then interviewed, and clips of their competing songs were played.[192][193][194]

  Qualifiers
Results of the first semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[195]
R/O Country Artist Song Points Place
1   Norway Alessandra "Queen of Kings" 102 6
2   Malta The Busker "Dance (Our Own Party)" 3 15
3   Serbia Luke Black "Samo mi se spava" 37 10
4   Latvia Sudden Lights "Aijā" 34 11
5   Portugal Mimicat "Ai coração" 74 9
6   Ireland Wild Youth "We Are One" 10 12
7   Croatia Let 3 "Mama ŠČ!" 76 8
8    Switzerland Remo Forrer "Watergun" 97 7
9   Israel Noa Kirel "Unicorn" 127 3
10   Moldova Pasha Parfeni "Soarele și luna" 109 5
11   Sweden Loreen "Tattoo" 135 2
12   Azerbaijan TuralTuranX "Tell Me More" 4 14
13   Czechia Vesna "My Sister's Crown" 110 4
14   Netherlands Mia Nicolai and Dion Cooper "Burning Daylight" 7 13
15   Finland Käärijä "Cha Cha Cha" 177 1

Semi-final 2 edit

 
Mariya Yaremchuk and Zlata Dziunka performed as part of an interval act in the second semi-final.

The second semi-final took place on 11 May 2023 at 20:00 BST (21:00 CEST).[7][187] Sixteen countries participated in this semi-final, with the running order published on 22 March 2023.[188] Australia won the most points, followed by Austria, Poland, Lithuania, Slovenia, Armenia, Cyprus, Belgium, Albania, and Estonia. The countries that failed to reach the final were Iceland, Georgia, Greece, Denmark, Romania, and San Marino. All the countries competing in this semi-final were eligible to vote, plus Spain, Ukraine and the United Kingdom, as well as non-participating countries under an aggregated "Rest of the World" vote.[189]

This semi-final featured a pre-recorded spoken word piece on the history of the contest by actor Luke Evans during a break between the competing performances,[9][196][197] while the interval acts included "Music Unites Generations", a medley of well-known Ukrainian musical works performed by Mariya Yaremchuk, Otoy and Zlata Dziunka, and a dance sketch choreographed by Jason Gilkison and performed by three drag performers, Miss Demeanour, Miss Mercedes Bends, and Tomara Thomas, along with the Podilya dance ensemble.[198][199][200] The sketch, titled "Be Who You Wanna Be", was set to a medley of "Free Yourself", "Free Your Mind", "Free" and the 2018 Australian entry "We Got Love". The British, Spanish and Ukrainian artists were then interviewed, and clips of their competing songs were played.[201]

  Qualifiers
Results of the second semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[202]
R/O Country Artist Song Points Place
1   Denmark Reiley "Breaking My Heart" 6 14
2   Armenia Brunette "Future Lover" 99 6
3   Romania Theodor Andrei "D.G.T. (Off and On)" 0 15[c]
4   Estonia Alika "Bridges" 74 10
5   Belgium Gustaph "Because of You" 90 8
6   Cyprus Andrew Lambrou "Break a Broken Heart" 94 7
7   Iceland Diljá "Power" 44 11
8   Greece Victor Vernicos "What They Say" 14 13
9   Poland Blanka "Solo" 124 3
10   Slovenia Joker Out "Carpe Diem" 103 5
11   Georgia Iru "Echo" 33 12
12   San Marino Piqued Jacks "Like an Animal" 0 16[d]
13   Austria Teya and Salena "Who the Hell Is Edgar?" 137 2
14   Albania Albina and Familja Kelmendi "Duje" 83 9
15   Lithuania Monika Linkytė "Stay" 110 4
16   Australia Voyager "Promise" 149 1

Final edit

 
Duncan Laurence performed together with the guest artists and the presenters as part of an interval act in the final. Ruslana can be seen on the LED background, in a pre-recorded appearance from the Golden Gate in Kyiv.

The final took place on 13 May 2023 at 20:00 BST (21:00 CEST).[7][187] Twenty-six countries participated in the final, with the jury and televote of all thirty-seven participating countries, as well as non-participating countries under an aggregated "Rest of the World" online vote, eligible to vote. The running order for the final was published on 12 May 2023.[203] Sweden won the contest with the song "Tattoo", performed by Loreen and written by her along with Jimmy Jansson, Jimmy "Joker" Thörnfeldt, Moa "Cazzi Opeia" Carlebecker, Peter Boström, and Thomas G:son.[204] Sweden won with 583 points, also winning the jury vote. Finland came second with 526 points and won the televote, with Israel, Italy, Norway, Ukraine, Belgium, Estonia, Australia and Czechia completing the top ten. Albania, Portugal, Serbia, the United Kingdom, and Germany occupied the bottom five positions.[205]

The final was opened by Kalush Orchestra performing their winning song "Stefania" and their latest single "Changes". Among those who appeared in the pre-recorded portion of the opening were Bolt Strings, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Joss Stone, Ballet Black, Ms Banks, and Catherine, Princess of Wales.[206][207] This was followed by the flag parade, introducing all twenty-six finalists, accompanied by four former Ukrainian Eurovision entrants performing new spins on their competing songs mixed with British classics: Go_A with "Shum", Jamala with her winning song "1944", Tina Karol with "Show Me Your Love", and Verka Serduchka with "Dancing Lasha Tumbai". The interval acts included Sam Ryder performing his new single "Mountain" with Queen's Roger Taylor,[208] and "The Liverpool Songbook", a homage to Liverpool's music heritage featuring six former Eurovision entrants singing their own version of songs from the host city: Mahmood with "Imagine", Netta with "You Spin Me Round (Like a Record)", Daði Freyr with "Whole Again", Cornelia Jakobs with "I Turn to You", Sonia with "Better the Devil You Know", and Duncan Laurence, together with the aforementioned artists, the presenters, and Ruslana in a pre-recorded appearance at the Golden Gate in Kyiv, with "You'll Never Walk Alone". ABBA's Björn Ulvaeus also appeared in a short video skit on the recent commercial successes to come out of the contest.[209][210][211][212]

  Winner
Results of the final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[205]
R/O Country Artist Song Points Place
1   Austria Teya and Salena "Who the Hell Is Edgar?" 120 15
2   Portugal Mimicat "Ai coração" 59 23
3    Switzerland Remo Forrer "Watergun" 92 20
4   Poland Blanka "Solo" 93 19
5   Serbia Luke Black "Samo mi se spava" 30 24
6   France La Zarra "Évidemment" 104 16
7   Cyprus Andrew Lambrou "Break a Broken Heart" 126 12
8   Spain Blanca Paloma "Eaea" 100 17
9   Sweden Loreen "Tattoo" 583 1
10   Albania Albina and Familja Kelmendi "Duje" 76 22
11   Italy Marco Mengoni "Due vite" 350 4
12   Estonia Alika "Bridges" 168 8
13   Finland Käärijä "Cha Cha Cha" 526 2
14   Czechia Vesna "My Sister's Crown" 129 10
15   Australia Voyager "Promise" 151 9
16   Belgium Gustaph "Because of You" 182 7
17   Armenia Brunette "Future Lover" 122 14
18   Moldova Pasha Parfeni "Soarele și luna" 96 18
19   Ukraine Tvorchi "Heart of Steel" 243 6
20   Norway Alessandra "Queen of Kings" 268 5
21   Germany Lord of the Lost "Blood & Glitter" 18 26
22   Lithuania Monika Linkytė "Stay" 127 11
23   Israel Noa Kirel "Unicorn" 362 3
24   Slovenia Joker Out "Carpe Diem" 78 21
25   Croatia Let 3 "Mama ŠČ!" 123 13
26   United Kingdom Mae Muller "I Wrote a Song" 24 25

Spokespersons edit

The spokespersons announced the 12-point score from their respective country's national jury in the following order.[213][214] Unlike in the editions from 2016 to 2022, in which the previous host country announced its points first, Ukraine was the first country to announce its jury points, followed by the previous host country, Italy. The current host country, the United Kingdom, announced its points last as usual.[215]

  1.   Ukraine – Zlata Ognevich
  2.   Italy – Kaze
  3.   Latvia – Jānis Pētersons
  4.   Netherlands – S10
  5.   Malta – Ryan Hili
  6.   Moldova – Doina Stimpovschi
  7.   Ireland – Niamh Kavanagh
  8.   San Marino – John Kennedy O'Connor
  9.   Azerbaijan – Narmin Salmanova
  10.   Austria – Philipp Hansa
  11.   France – Anggun
  12.   Finland – Bess
  13.   Belgium – Bart Cannaerts [nl]
  14.   Germany – Elton
  15.   Portugal – Maro
  16.   Croatia – Maja Ciglenečki
  17.   Estonia – Ragnar Klavan
  18.   Armenia – Maléna
  19.   Poland – Ida Nowakowska
  20.   Romania – Eda Marcus
  21.   Iceland – Einar Stefánsson
  22.   Serbia – Dragana Kosjerina
  23.   Cyprus – Loukas Hamatsos
  24.   Norway – Ben Adams
  25.    Switzerland – Chiara Dubey
  26.   Australia – Catherine Martin
  27.   Denmark – Tina Müller
  28.   Spain – Ruth Lorenzo
  29.   Israel – Ilanit
  30.   Sweden – Farah Abadi
  31.   Georgia – Archil Sulakvelidze
  32.   Czechia – Radka Rosická [cs]
  33.   Slovenia – Melani Mekicar
  34.   Greece – Fotis Sergoulopoulos [el]
  35.   Albania – Andri Xhahu
  36.   Lithuania – Monika Liu
  37.   United Kingdom – Catherine Tate

Detailed voting results edit

Semi-final 1 edit

The ten qualifiers from the first semi-final were determined solely by televoting.[175] All fifteen countries competing in the first semi-final voted, alongside France, Germany and Italy, and the aggregated Rest of the World vote.[185] The ten qualifying countries were announced in no particular order, and the full results of how each country voted was published after the final had been held.

  Qualifiers
Detailed voting results of the first semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[195]
Voting procedure used:
  100% Televoting
Total score
Norway
Malta
Serbia
Latvia
Portugal
Ireland
Croatia
Switzerland
Israel
Moldova
Sweden
Azerbaijan
Czechia
Netherlands
Finland
France
Germany
Italy
Rest of the World
Contestants
Norway 102 10 5 4 3 2 6 3 10 8 10 2 10 5 10 1 3 10
Malta 3 2 1
Serbia 37 5 10 6 1 3 3 4 2 1 2
Latvia 34 2 4 4 1 6 1 1 3 3 1 8
Portugal 74 2 4 3 1 5 12 3 4 4 2 7 2 12 5 2 6
Ireland 10 3 3 1 2 1
Croatia 76 4 12 7 5 5 5 3 5 4 2 6 10 5 3
Switzerland 97 8 6 1 3 5 7 2 4 7 8 7 5 8 8 6 8 4
Israel 127 5 8 7 8 7 6 7 7 12 3 12 12 4 1 8 2 6 12
Moldova 109 6 1 4 6 12 10 3 2 6 6 4 7 3 7 10 6 12 4
Sweden 135 10 12 6 10 8 8 4 8 7 10 10 6 12 5 5 4 3 7
Azerbaijan 4 2 1 1
Czechia 110 7 2 8 5 6 3 8 4 8 5 7 5 6 12 4 7 8 5
Netherlands 7 1 1 2 2 1
Finland 177 12 7 10 12 10 12 12 10 12 6 12 8 8 10 7 12 7 10

12 points edit

Below is a summary of all 12 points awarded in the first semi-final. Finland received the maximum score of 12 points from seven of the voting countries, with Israel receiving four sets of 12 points, Moldova, Portugal and Sweden receiving two sets of 12 points each, and Croatia and Czechia each received one maximum score.[195]

12 points awarded in the first semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[195]
# Recipient Countries giving 12 points
7   Finland   Croatia,   Germany,   Ireland,   Israel,   Latvia,   Norway,   Sweden
4   Israel   Azerbaijan,   Czechia,   Moldova,   Rest of the World
2   Moldova   Italy,   Portugal
  Portugal   France,    Switzerland
  Sweden   Malta,   Netherlands
1   Croatia   Serbia
  Czechia   Finland

Semi-final 2 edit

The ten qualifiers from the second semi-final were determined solely by televoting,[175] with the exception of San Marino who were unable to provide a valid televote result and thus used the votes of their back-up jury.[citation needed] All sixteen countries competing in the second semi-final voted, alongside Spain, Ukraine and the United Kingdom, and the aggregated Rest of the World vote.[185] The ten qualifying countries were announced in no particular order, and the full results of how each country voted was published after the final had been held.

  Qualifiers
Detailed voting results of the second semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[202]
Voting procedure used:
  100% Televoting
  100% Jury vote
Total score
Denmark
Armenia
Romania
Estonia
Belgium
Cyprus
Iceland
Greece
Poland
Slovenia
Georgia
San Marino
Austria
Albania
Lithuania
Australia
Spain
Ukraine
United Kingdom
Rest of the World
Contestants
Denmark 6 6
Armenia 99 6 3 12 10 8 5 1 12 4 4 8 1 2 10 3 10
Romania 0
Estonia 74 1 6 5 2 3 3 3 2 5 2 10 3 2 10 4 1 8 2 2
Belgium 90 8 1 4 4 7 1 3 7 3 5 12 3 5 7 8 1 6 5
Cyprus 94 4 10 4 5 4 5 12 7 4 5 1 2 6 4 10 3 4 4
Iceland 44 12 2 1 3 6 7 1 1 2 5 1 3
Greece 14 2 12
Poland 124 7 8 3 8 7 6 10 5 8 8 2 7 7 12 4 12 10
Slovenia 103 2 5 12 7 3 2 1 2 12 1 10 4 7 8 12 6 3 6
Georgia 33 12 2 1 7 1 3 3 1 2 1
San Marino 0
Austria 137 6 3 7 6 10 5 8 6 10 10 4 8 10 6 12 6 5 7 8
Albania 83 3 7 8 8 1 2 10 4 12 6 3 2 5 12
Lithuania 110 5 1 10 5 8 4 6 2 10 12 5 5 6 5 10 12 4
Australia 149 10 4 10 12 6 7 12 4 8 6 7 6 8 12 8 7 7 8 7

12 points edit

Below is a summary of all 12 points received in the second semi-final. Australia and Slovenia both received the maximum score of 12 points from three of the voting countries, with Albania, Armenia, Lithuania and Poland receiving two sets of 12 points each, and Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Georgia, Greece and Iceland each receiving one maximum score.[202]

12 points awarded in the second semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[202]
# Recipient Countries giving 12 points
3   Australia   Albania,   Estonia,   Iceland
  Slovenia   Poland,   Romania,   Spain
2   Albania   Rest of the World,   Slovenia
  Armenia   Belgium,   Georgia
  Lithuania   San Marino,   United Kingdom
  Poland   Lithuania,   Ukraine
1   Austria   Australia
  Belgium   Austria
  Cyprus   Greece
  Georgia   Armenia
  Greece   Cyprus
  Iceland   Denmark

Final edit

Split results[205]
Place Combined Jury Televoting
Country Points Country Points Country Points
1   Sweden 583   Sweden 340   Finland 376
2   Finland 526   Israel 177   Sweden 243
3   Israel 362   Italy 176   Norway 216
4   Italy 350   Finland 150   Ukraine 189
5   Norway 268   Estonia 146   Israel 185
6   Ukraine 243   Australia 130   Italy 174
7   Belgium 182   Belgium 127   Croatia 112
8   Estonia 168   Austria 104   Poland 81
9   Australia 151   Spain 95   Moldova 76
10   Czechia 129   Czechia 94   Albania 59
11   Lithuania 127   Lithuania 81   Cyprus 58
12   Cyprus 126   Armenia 69   Belgium 55
13   Croatia 123   Cyprus 68   Armenia 53
14   Armenia 122    Switzerland 61   France 50
15   Austria 120   Ukraine 54[e]   Lithuania 46
16   France 104   France 54[e]   Slovenia 45
17   Spain 100   Norway 52   Czechia 35
18   Moldova 96   Portugal 43    Switzerland 31
19   Poland 93   Slovenia 33   Estonia 22
20    Switzerland 92   Moldova 20   Australia 21
21   Slovenia 78   Albania 17   Serbia 16[f]
22   Albania 76   United Kingdom 15   Austria 16[f]
23   Portugal 59   Serbia 14   Portugal 16[f]
24   Serbia 30   Poland 12   Germany 15
25   United Kingdom 24   Croatia 11   United Kingdom 9
26   Germany 18   Germany 3   Spain 5

The results of the final were determined by televoting and jury voting in all thirty-seven participating countries, plus the Rest of the World aggregate public vote.[175] The announcement of the jury points was conducted by each country individually, with the country's spokesperson announcing their jury's favourite entry that received 12 points, with the remaining points shown on screen. Following the completion of the jury points announcement, the public points were announced as an aggregate by the contest hosts in ascending order starting from the country which received the fewest points from the jury.

  Winner
Detailed jury voting results of the final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[205]
  • Voting procedure used:
  •   100% Televoting
  •   100% Jury vote
Total score
Jury vote score
Televoting score
Jury vote
Ukraine
Italy
Latvia
Netherlands
Malta
Moldova
Ireland
San Marino
Azerbaijan
Austria
France
Finland
Belgium
Germany
Portugal
Croatia
Estonia
Armenia
Poland
Romania
Iceland
Serbia
Cyprus
Norway
Switzerland
Australia
Denmark
Spain
Israel
Sweden
Georgia
Czechia
Slovenia
Greece
Albania
Lithuania
United Kingdom
Contestants
Austria 120 104 16 1 1 6 10 2 12 2 2 8 6 10 7 6 7 6 3 7 8
Portugal 59 43 16 5 3 8 5 3 1 2 6 10
Switzerland 92 61 31 4 6 6 4 4 3 10 2 2 2 2 6 1 2 7
Poland 93 12 81 6 2 1 1 2
Serbia 30 14 16 1 3 4 4 1 1
France 104 54 50 3 5 7 1 7 4 6 5 10 6
Cyprus 126 68 58 6 5 4 2 1 5 10 6 7 3 5 1 1 3 4 4 1
Spain 100 95 5 8 7 3 2 7 6 7 10 6 2 6 3 3 6 1 3 4 3 2 1 5
Sweden 583 340 243 12 8 10 12 12 12 12 4 10 10 6 12 8 12 5 10 12 10 7 10 7 5 12 10 6 7 12 12 12 4 10 7 6 12 12 12
Albania 76 17 59 1 8 5 3
Italy 350 176 174 2 3 10 10 12 6 12 2 6 7 4 12 5 6 12 2 5 6 8 1 10 7 8 4 12 2 2
Estonia 168 146 22 5 6 12 7 10 1 10 8 3 8 8 10 8 7 5 2 5 2 10 8 5 6
Finland 526 150 376 10 8 8 3 8 8 5 7 10 8 10 7 3 12 5 8 1 8 12 1 5 3
Czechia 129 94 35 7 7 8 3 5 4 8 3 5 7 6 1 1 4 12 4 3 6
Australia 151 130 21 8 5 4 5 5 4 8 12 8 4 3 12 8 5 2 2 2 7 4 5 3 4 10
Belgium 182 127 55 2 2 4 10 7 3 5 6 6 5 2 5 12 3 4 3 12 5 12 5 7 7
Armenia 122 69 53 5 1 2 6 1 7 3 1 4 5 3 10 8 10 3
Moldova 96 20 76 3 2 7 8
Ukraine 243 54 189 10 4 6 2 1 7 3 7 12 2
Norway 268 52 216 2 1 6 1 4 4 4 10 2 10 8
Germany 18 3 15 2 1
Lithuania 127 81 46 10 3 7 4 1 8 7 1 1 3 10 4 6 8 8
Israel 362 177 185 1 12 5 2 7 7 12 12 10 8 4 12 12 4 10 7 3 1 8 5 7 8 6 10 4
Slovenia 78 33 45 3 6 5 12 6 1
Croatia 123 11 112 3 8
United Kingdom 24 15 9 4 2 4 1 4
Detailed televoting results of the final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[205]
Voting procedure used:
  100% Televoting
  100% Jury vote
Total score
Jury vote score
Televoting score
Televote
Ukraine
Italy
Latvia
Netherlands
Malta
Moldova
Ireland
San Marino
Azerbaijan
Austria
France
Finland
Belgium
Germany
Portugal
Croatia
Estonia
Armenia
Poland
Romania
Iceland
Serbia
Cyprus
Norway
Switzerland
Australia
Denmark
Spain
Israel
Sweden
Georgia
Czechia
Slovenia
Greece
Albania
Lithuania
United Kingdom
Rest of the World
Contestants
Austria 120 104 16 4 2 3 7
Portugal 59 43 16 5 7 4
Switzerland 92 61 31 1 1 2 1 3 4 2 5 4 8
Poland 93 12 81 12 2 4 8 1 4 4 3 5 7 2 6 5 1 1 8 8
Serbia 30 14 16 2 7 1 6
France 104 54 50 1 2 2 10 3 4 1 3 8 2 1 2 3 3 3 1 1
Cyprus 126 68 58 3 5 6 8 4 1 2 8 2 12 7
Spain 100 95 5 3 2
Sweden 583 340 243 3 3 8 8 10 8 6 8 10 4 3 10 1 7 2 10 7 7 8 10 6 8 10 5 10 8 5 4 7 6 4 8 10 7 5 7
Albania 76 17 59 7 3 3 3 8 6 12 7 4 6
Italy 350 176 174 3 12 5 7 4 8 7 7 10 6 8 2 3 7 1 2 6 7 10 3 6 7 6 5 1 8 5 12 6
Estonia 168 146 22 6 5 6 5
Finland 526 150 376 10 6 12 12 8 7 12 12 8 12 6 12 12 10 10 12 6 10 10 12 12 7 12 8 12 12 12 12 12 8 10 10 10 6 12 12 10
Czechia 129 94 35 2 2 1 1 3 10 3 3 4 2 3 1
Australia 151 130 21 1 8 6 3 1 2
Belgium 182 127 55 10 3 2 2 1 6 4 3 6 3 7 2 6
Armenia 122 69 53 2 12 6 4 2 3 12 2 2 8
Moldova 96 20 76 6 12 4 3 8 3 8 1 12 1 1 1 5 3 5 2 1
Ukraine 243 54 189 8 7 5 12 7 6 7 5 4 1 7 12 8 1 12 4 2 10 1 7 10 8 4 10 12 10 4 5
Norway 268 52 216 7 10 3 7 7 6 5 4 2 7 1 12 8 5 4 5 7 4 8 5 8 5 5 2 6 10 8 10 10 2 7 5 6 4 7 4
Germany 18 3 15 6 5 4
Lithuania 127 81 46 4 10 10 2 5 1 4 10
Israel 362 177 185 1 5 5 6 6 10 1 10 12 1 10 5 5 4 12 5 6 7 12 3 3 5 7 6 8 7 5 3 3 12
Slovenia 78 33 45 2 5 7 12 1 2 2 8 1 3 2
Croatia 123 11 112 8 4 4 2 10 4 6 6 5 10 6 4 6 5 1 4 12 8 4 3
United Kingdom 24 15 9 5 4

12 points edit

Below is a summary of all 12 points received in the final. In the jury vote, Sweden received the maximum score of 12 points from fifteen countries, with Italy and Israel receiving five sets of 12 points. Belgium received the maximum score from three countries, Australia and Finland were awarded two sets of 12 points each, and Austria, Czechia, Estonia, Slovenia and Ukraine were each being awarded one set of 12 points. In the public vote, Finland received the maximum score of 12 points from eighteen countries, followed by Israel and Ukraine which received four sets of 12 points each. Armenia, Italy and Moldova received two sets of maximum scores each, and Albania, Croatia, Cyprus, Norway, Poland and Slovenia were each awarded one set of 12 points. The winning country Sweden failed to receive any maximum scores from the public vote.[205]

12 points awarded by juries in the final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[205]
# Recipient Countries giving 12 points
15   Sweden   Albania,   Cyprus,   Denmark,   Estonia,   Finland,   Germany,   Ireland,   Israel,   Lithuania,   Malta,   Moldova,   Netherlands,   Spain,   Ukraine,   United Kingdom
5   Israel   Armenia,   Azerbaijan,   France,   Italy,   Poland
  Italy   Austria,   Croatia,   Romania,   San Marino,   Slovenia
3   Belgium   Australia,   Georgia,   Greece
2   Australia   Iceland,   Portugal
  Finland   Norway,   Sweden
1   Austria   Belgium
  Czechia    Switzerland
  Estonia   Latvia
  Slovenia   Serbia
  Ukraine   Czechia
12 points awarded by televoting in the final of the Eurovision Song Contest 2023[205]
# Recipient Countries giving 12 points
18   Finland   Australia,   Austria,   Belgium,   Denmark,   Estonia,   Germany,   Iceland,   Ireland,   Israel,   Latvia,   Lithuania,   Netherlands,   Norway,   San Marino,   Serbia,   Spain,   Sweden,   United Kingdom
4   Israel   Armenia,   Azerbaijan,   Cyprus,   Rest of the World
  Ukraine   Czechia,   Moldova,   Poland,   Portugal
2   Italy   Albania,   Malta
  Armenia   France,   Georgia
  Moldova   Italy,   Romania
1   Albania    Switzerland
  Cyprus   Greece
  Croatia   Slovenia
  Norway   Finland
  Poland   Ukraine
  Slovenia   Croatia

Broadcasts edit

All participating broadcasters may choose to have on-site or remote commentators providing insight and voting information to their local audience. While they must broadcast at least the semi-final they are voting in and the final, most broadcasters air all three shows with different programming plans. In addition, some non-participating broadcasters air the contest. The European Broadcasting Union also provided international live streams with no commentary of both semi-finals and the final through their official YouTube and TikTok channels.[216][217] The table below details the broadcasting plans and commentators for the countries that aired the contest. According to the EBU, in total 162 million people watched at least a minute of the television broadcasts, and 15.6 million people watched the online broadcasts. Votes were received from 144 countries, including the 37 competing countries.[3][4]

Technical issues occurred during the start of the first semi-final, causing most of the on-site commentators to lose connection to their broadcasters for around 15 minutes.[218]

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries[81]
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Show(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
  Albania RTSH RTSH 1, RTSH Muzikë, Radio Tirana All shows Andri Xhahu [219]
  Armenia AMPTV Armenia 1 All shows Hrachuhi Utmazyan and Hamlet Arakelyan [220][221]
  Australia SBS SBS All shows Myf Warhurst and Joel Creasey [222][223][224]
  Austria ORF ORF 1 All shows Andi Knoll [225][226][227]
FM4 Final Jan Böhmermann and Olli Schulz [228][229]
  Azerbaijan İTV All shows Azer Suleymanli [230]
  Belgium VRT VRT 1 All shows Peter Van de Veire [231][232]
Radio 2 Final
RTBF Tipik SF1 Jean-Louis Lahaye [fr] and Maureen Louys [233]
La Une SF2/Final
VivaCité All shows
  Croatia HRT HRT 1, HR 2 All shows Duško Ćurlić [234][235][236]
  Cyprus CyBC RIK 1, RIK Sat All shows Melina Karageorgiou and Alexandros Taramountas [237][238]
  Czechia ČT ČT2 All shows Jan Maxián [239][240][241][242]
  Denmark DR DR1 All shows Nicolai Molbech [243]
  Estonia ERR ETV All shows Marko Reikop [244][245]
ETV+ Aleksandr Hobotov and Julia Kalenda
ETV2 Final Sign language: Various interpreters
  Finland Yle Yle TV1 All shows Mikko Silvennoinen [246]
Yle Radio Suomi All shows Sanna Pirkkalainen and Jorma Hietamäki [246][247][248][249]
Yle X3M Eva Frantz [fi] and Johan Lindroos [sv]
YleX SF1/Final Sini Laitinen [fi]
Yle Areena [fi] All shows
  • Swedish: Eva Frantz and Johan Lindroos
  • Inari Sámi: Heli Huovinen
  • Northern Sámi: Aslak Paltto [fi]
[246]
SF1/Final
  • Russian: Levan Tvaltvadze
  • Ukrainian: Galyna Sergeyeva
  France France Télévisions Culturebox Semi‑finals Anggun and André Manoukian [250][251][252]
France 2 Final Laurence Boccolini and Stéphane Bern
  Georgia GPB 1TV All shows Nika Lobiladze [253][254]
  Germany ARD/NDR One All shows Peter Urban [255][256][257][258]
Das Erste Final
Deutsche Welle DW Deutsch, DW Deutsch+ [259][260]
ARD/RBB Radio Eins [de] Amelie Ernst [de] and Max Spallek [de] [261]
  Greece ERT ERT1 All shows Maria Kozakou and Jenny Melita [262][263][264][265][266][267]
Deftero Programma Dimitris Meidanis, Maria Kozakou and Jenny Melita
  Iceland RÚV RÚV All shows Gísli Marteinn Baldursson [268][269]
RÚV 2 Sign language: Various interpreters
  Ireland RTÉ RTÉ One SF1/Final Marty Whelan [270][271][272]
RTÉ2 SF2
RTÉ 2fm SF1/Final Neil Doherty and Zbyszek Zalinski
  Israel IPBC Kan 11, Kan Educational, Kan 88 [he] Semi‑finals Asaf Liberman [he] and Akiva Novick [he] [273][274][275]
Kan 11, Kan Tarbut [he], Kan B [he] Final Asaf Liberman, Akiva Novick and Doron Medalie
Kan 88 Kobi Menora and Sharon Kantor
  Italy RAI Rai 2 Semi‑finals Gabriele Corsi [it] and Mara Maionchi [276][277][278][279][280]
Rai 1 Final
Rai Radio 2 All shows Mariolina Simone [it], Diletta Parlangeli and Saverio Raimondo [it]
  Latvia LTV LTV1 All shows Toms Grēviņš [lv] [281]
Final Lauris Reiniks
  Lithuania LRT LRT televizija, LRT Radijas All shows Ramūnas Zilnys [lt] [282]
  Malta PBS TVM All shows No commentary [283][284]
  Moldova TRM Moldova 1, Radio Moldova, Radio Moldova Muzical All shows Ion Jalbă [285]
  Netherlands NPO/AVROTROS NPO 1, BVN All shows Cornald Maas and Jan Smit [286][287][288][289]
NPO Radio 2 Final Wouter van der Goes and Frank van 't Hof [nl]
  Norway NRK NRK1 All shows Marte Stokstad [no] [290][291][292]
NRK3, NRK P3 Final Arian Engebø [no], Egil Skurdal, Adelina Ibishi [no] and Nate Kahungu
NRK P1 Jon Marius Hyttebakk
  Poland TVP TVP1, TVP Polonia All shows Aleksander Sikora [pl] and Marek Sierocki [pl] [293][294][295]
  Portugal RTP RTP1, RTP Internacional, RTP África All shows[g] José Carlos Malato and Nuno Galopim [297][296][298][299]
  Romania TVR TVR 1, TVRi All shows Bogdan Stănescu and Kyrie Mendel [300]
  San Marino SMRTV San Marino RTV, Radio San Marino All shows Lia Fiorio and Gigi Restivo [301][302][303]
  Serbia RTS RTS Svet All shows Duška Vučinić[h] [304][305][306][307][308]
RTS 3 Semi‑finals
RTS 1 Final
Radio Beograd 1 [sr]
  Slovenia RTVSLO TV SLO 2 [sl] Semi‑finals Andrej Hofer [sl] [309][310][311][312][313][314]
TV SLO 1 [sl] Final
Radio Val 202, Radio Maribor [sl] SF2 Maja Stepančič, Maruša Kerec [sl], Neja Jerant and Uršula Zaletelj
Final Maja Stepančič, Miha Šalehar [sl] and Uršula Zaletelj
  Spain RTVE La 2 SF1 Tony Aguilar and Julia Varela [315][316][317][318]
La 1 SF2/Final
TVE Internacional All shows
Radio Nacional Final David Asensio, Imanol Durán, Irene Vaquero and Ángela Fernández
  Sweden SVT SVT1 All shows Edward af Sillén [319][320][321]
Final Måns Zelmerlöw
SR SR P4 All shows Carolina Norén [322][323]
   Switzerland SRG SSR SRF zwei Semi‑finals Sven Epiney [324][325][326][327]
SRF 1 Final
RTS 2 Semi‑finals Jean-Marc Richard, Nicolas Tanner and Priscilla Formaz [328][329]
RTS 1 Final
RSI La 2 Semi‑finals Ellis Cavallini and Gian-Andrea Costa [330][331][332][333]
RSI La 1 Final
  Ukraine UA:PBC Suspilne Kultura All shows Timur Miroshnychenko [334][335][336]
Radio Promin [uk] Final Oleksandra Franko and Oleksandr Barbelen
  United Kingdom BBC BBC One Semi‑finals Scott Mills and Rylan [172][337][338][9][339]
Final Graham Norton and Mel Giedroyc
BBC iPlayer All shows Sign language: Various interpreters
BBC Radio 2, BBC Radio Merseyside Semi‑finals Paddy O'Connell
BBC Radio 2 Final Scott Mills and Rylan
BBC Radio Merseyside Claire Sweeney and Paul Quinn
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Show(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
  Chile Canal 13 Final Sergio Lagos [es] and Rayén Araya [340][341]
  Faroe Islands KVF All shows Faroese: Gunnar Nolsøe and Siri Súsonnudóttir Hansen
Danish: Nicolai Molbech[i]
[342][343][344][345]
  Kosovo RTK RTK1 All shows Albanian: Jeta Çitaku and Ylber Asllanaj [346][347][348][349]
  Montenegro RTCG TVCG 2 All shows Dražen Bauković and Tijana Mišković [350][351][134]
  North Macedonia MRT MRT 1, MRT 2, Radio Skopje All shows Aleksandra Jovanovska and Eli Tanaskovska [352][353][354]
  Slovakia RTVS Rádio FM Final Daniel Baláž, Lucia Haverlík, Pavol Hubinák and Juraj Malíček [355][356][357]
  United States NBC Peacock All shows No commentary [358][359]
Final Johnny Weir
WJFD-FM Final Ewan Spence and Samantha Ross [360]

Reception edit

Commercial impact edit

After winning the 2023 contest, Sweden's entry "Tattoo" became a commercial success. It peaked at number two on the UK Singles Chart dated 19 May 2023, and later became the first Eurovision song in 27 years to spend two weeks in the UK top five.[361] In total, it spent four weeks in the UK top ten.[362] It also topped the official charts in ten countries, and reached the top ten in a further 17 countries. The day after the final, "Tattoo" garnered 4,275,290 streams on Spotify, thus breaking the record for the most streams achieved by a Eurovision song on a single day, which was previously held by the 2021 winning entry "Zitti e buoni".[363]

Along with "Tattoo", three other entries in the 2023 contest entered the top ten of the UK Singles Chart dated 19 May 2023, which is a first in the history of the chart: Finland's "Cha Cha Cha" at number six, the UK's "I Wrote a Song" at number nine, and Norway's "Queen of Kings" at number ten.[364] On the Billboard Global 200 chart dated 27 May 2023, "Tattoo", "Cha Cha Cha" and "Queen of Kings" entered at numbers 15, 27 and 58, respectively. On the Billboard Global Excl. US chart also dated 27 May 2023, "Tattoo", "Cha Cha Cha" and "Queen of Kings" entered at numbers 7, 13 and 29, respectively, followed by Israel's "Unicorn" at number 153 and Italy's "Due vite" at number 174. "Due vite" had previously peaked at number 32 following its win at the Sanremo Music Festival 2023, which also doubled as the Italian national final.[365][366]

Reaction to the results edit

Sweden's overall victory despite Finland's lead in the televoting sparked controversy among a subset of viewers and members of the live audience.[367][368][369] During the jury voting sequence, several occasions when Sweden scored 12 points were disrupted by chanting from Finland's supporters,[370] although the Swedish entrant Loreen, following her win, stated that she did not mind and furthermore appreciated their enthusiasm.[371][372] While the televote winner failed to win overall on three previous occasions, in 2015, 2016 and 2019, 2023 was different in that Finland's lead of 133 points in the televote was the largest to date for an entry that did not win, and it also received the full 12 points from 18 different countries in the televoting, while Sweden did not win 12 points from any.[367]

Broadcasting awards edit

The 2023 contest was presented with the Changemaker Award at the International Broadcasting Convention, in recognition of "its contribution to society and culture – celebrating a brand that continues to stay relevant and fresh on a huge scale". The award was received on 17 September 2023 by the contest's executive supervisor Martin Österdahl.[373][374][375] The broadcast of the contest also received nominations for Best Entertainment Performance (for co-presenter Hannah Waddingham) and Best Live Event Coverage at the 2024 British Academy Television Awards.[376][377]

Other awards edit

In addition to the main winner's trophy, the Marcel Bezençon Awards and the You're a Vision Award were contested during the Eurovision Song Contest 2023. The OGAE, "General Organisation of Eurovision Fans" voting poll also took place before the contest.

Marcel Bezençon Awards edit

The Marcel Bezençon Awards, organised since 2002 by Sweden's then-Head of Delegation and 1992 representative Christer Björkman, and winner of the 1984 contest Richard Herrey, honours songs in the contest's final.[378] The awards are divided into three categories: the Artistic Award, the Composers Award, and the Press Award.[379] The winners were revealed shortly before the Eurovision final on 13 May.[380]

Category Country Song Performer(s) Songwriter(s)
Artistic Award   Sweden "Tattoo" Loreen
Press Award
Composers Award   Italy "Due vite" Marco Mengoni

OGAE edit

OGAE, an organisation of over forty Eurovision Song Contest fan clubs across Europe and beyond, conducts an annual voting poll first held in 2002 as the Marcel Bezençon Fan Award. After all votes were cast, the top-ranked entry in the 2023 poll was also the winner of the contest, "Tattoo" performed by Loreen; the top five results are shown below.[381][382][383]

Country Performer(s) Song OGAE result
  Sweden Loreen "Tattoo" 423
  Finland Käärijä "Cha Cha Cha" 394
  France La Zarra "Évidemment" 302
  Norway Alessandra "Queen of Kings" 263
  Austria Teya and Salena "Who the Hell Is Edgar?" 228

You're a Vision Award edit

The You're a Vision Award (a word play of "Eurovision"), established in 2022 by the fansite Songfestival.be following the cancellation of the Barbara Dex Award due to its associated negative connotations, aims to "celebrate the creativity and diversity that embody the Eurovision spirit", with the winner being the one with the most notable outfit. Finland's Käärijä won the 2023 award, with Croatia's Let 3 and Belgium's Gustaph completing the top three.[384]

Place Country Performer(s)
1   Finland Käärijä
2   Croatia Let 3
3   Belgium Gustaph

Eurovision Awards edit

The third edition of the Eurovision Awards saw the competing acts of 2023 celebrated across eight categories, with the results determined via a vote held on the contest's official app.[385][386]

Winners are listed first and highlighted in boldface.

King/Queen of Rizz Style Icon
Most Iconic Duo Vocal Powerhouse
King/Queen of Choreo Exemplary Artistic Vision
Best Bouffant Miss Congeniality

Official album edit

 
Cover art of the official album

Eurovision Song Contest: Liverpool 2023 is the official compilation album of the contest. It was put together by the European Broadcasting Union and was released by Universal Music Group digitally on 14 April 2023, in CD format on 28 April 2023, and in vinyl format on 26 May 2023.[387][388][389] The album features all 37 entries.

Charts edit

Weekly chart performance for Eurovision Song Contest: Liverpool 2023
Chart (2023) Peak
position
Australian Albums (ARIA)[390] 15
Austrian Compilation Albums (Ö3 Austria)[391] 1
Belgian Compilation Albums (Ultratop 50 Flanders)[392] 1
Belgian Compilation Albums (Ultratop 50 Wallonia)[393] 1
Danish Compilation Albums (Tracklisten)[394] 4
Dutch Compilation Albums (Compilation Top 30)[395] 1
German Compilation Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[396] 2
Irish Compilation Albums (IRMA)[397] 1
Scottish Compilation Albums (OCC)[398] 1
Swedish Physical Albums (Sverigetopplistan)[399] 5
Swiss Compilation Albums (Schweizer Hitparade)[400] 1
UK Compilation Albums (OCC)[401] 1

Certifications edit

Certifications for Eurovision Song Contest: Liverpool 2023
Region Certification Certified units/sales
United Kingdom (BPI)[402] Silver 60,000

Sales+streaming figures based on certification alone.

See also edit

Notes edit

  1. ^ On behalf of the German public broadcasting consortium ARD[98]
  2. ^ 100% televoting for the semi-finals was also used in 2008 and 2009, with the exception that only nine countries qualified via televoting whilst the highest-ranked entry by the backup juries outside the top nine also qualified.
  3. ^ Both Romania and San Marino scored 0 points, but Romania is deemed to have placed fifteenth according to the tie-break procedure, as it performed earlier in the running order.
  4. ^ Both Romania and San Marino scored 0 points, but Romania is deemed to have placed 15th according to tie-break procedure, as they performed earlier in the running order.
  5. ^ a b Despite finishing with the same number of points as France and receiving points from the same number of countries, Ukraine finished in fifteenth place in the jury voting due to receiving 12 points from a greater number of countries.
  6. ^ a b c Despite finishing with the same number of points, Serbia and Austria finished higher than Portugal in the televoting due to receiving points from a greater number of countries. Furthermore, despite receiving points from the same number of countries and the same amount of 12, 10, 8 and 7 points, Serbia finished higher in the televoting than Austria due to receiving more 6 points.
  7. ^ Second semi-final broadcast live on RTP Play and on tape-delay on RTP1 and RTP Internacional at 21:43 WEST (20:43 UTC) and on RTP África at 02:45 WEST (01:45 UTC) on 12 May[296]
  8. ^ Due to the aforementioned technical issues, Tijana Lukić commentated from Belgrade during the first 15 minutes of the first semi-final.
  9. ^ Retransmission of DR's commentary feed

References edit

  1. ^ Rosney, Daniel (17 October 2022). "Eurovision: Montenegro and North Macedonia pull out of Liverpool contest". BBC News. Retrieved 20 October 2022.
  2. ^ Hallsenius, Hedda (8 November 2022). "Flera länder drar sig ur när Eurovision blir dyrare" [Several countries withdraw when Eurovision becomes more expensive]. SVT Nyheter (in Swedish). Sveriges Television. Retrieved 10 November 2022.
  3. ^ a b "Eurovision Song Contest 2023 reaches 162 million viewers with record breaking online engagement and musical impact". ebu.ch. European Broadcasting Union (EBU). 25 May 2023. Retrieved 25 May 2023.
  4. ^ a b "Welcome back Luxembourg! Here's what you've missed..." Eurovision.tv. EBU. 7 September 2023. Retrieved 8 September 2023.
  5. ^ "A History of the United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest". Eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union (EBU). 25 July 2022. Retrieved 22 October 2022.
  6. ^ Heap, Steven (21 June 2023). "Ukraine: An Experience That Will Never Be Forgotten – Ukrainian Team Discuss Eurovision 2023". Eurovoix. Retrieved 21 June 2023.
  7. ^ a b c d e "Liverpool will host Eurovision 2023". Eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union (EBU). 7 October 2022. Retrieved 7 October 2022.
  8. ^ Falk, Simon (5 April 2023). "Turquoise Carpet and Welcome Party with access for OGAE members". Wiwibloggs. Retrieved 5 April 2023.
  9. ^ a b c Sullivan, Gail (19 April 2023). "Eurovision Song Contest 2023 on the BBC". bbc.co.uk (Press release). BBC. Retrieved 19 April 2023.
  10. ^ Wilde, Clare (1 March 2023). "Opera, trains and submarines star in Eurovision-inspired Cultural Festival - Culture Liverpool". www.cultureliverpool.co.uk. Retrieved 17 May 2023.
  11. ^ "EuroFest: Two-week cultural festival planned for Liverpool 2023". Eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union (EBU). 1 March 2023. Retrieved 1 March 2023.
  12. ^ Humphreys, David (1 March 2023). "Liverpool to host EuroFest in run up to Eurovision Song Contest". Liverpool Echo. Retrieved 3 March 2023.
  13. ^ "Liverpool 2023: Full Eurovision Village lineup announced". Eurovision.tv. EBU. 3 May 2023. Retrieved 17 May 2023.
  14. ^ "Eurovision Village 2023 - Stewarding & Security - Contracts Finder". contractsfinder.service.gov.uk. Government of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 1 November 2022.
  15. ^ Humphreys, David (1 November 2022). "Pier Head to host Eurovision village during song contest". Liverpool Echo. Retrieved 2 November 2022.
  16. ^ "Eurovision Village". Eurovision.tv. EBU. 23 April 2018. Retrieved 17 May 2023.
  17. ^ Megrath, Christopher (15 February 2023). "Eurovision fan zone to host 25,000 people during contest". Liverpool Echo. Retrieved 31 March 2023.
  18. ^ Farren, Neil (16 February 2023). "Eurovision 2023: Eurovision Village Details Announced". Eurovoix. Retrieved 22 March 2023.
  19. ^ "Eurovision Village: tickets for the Grand Final to cost £15". ESCUnited. 31 March 2023. Retrieved 10 April 2023.
  20. ^ "Liverpool 2023: EuroClub revealed... Camp and Furnace!". Eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union (EBU). 6 December 2022. Retrieved 6 December 2022.
  21. ^ "Camp and Furnace to host OGAE EuroClub during Eurovision 2023". Explore Liverpool. 6 December 2022. Retrieved 6 December 2022.
  22. ^ "How it works". Eurovision.tv. European Broadcasting Union (EBU). 15 January 2017. Retrieved 7 May 2022.