Eurovision Song Contest 2006

The Eurovision Song Contest 2006 was the 51st edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Athens, Greece, following the country's victory at the 2005 contest with the song "My Number One" by Helena Paparizou. It was the first time Greece had hosted the contest - 32 years after the country made its debut. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Hellenic Broadcasting Corporation (ERT), the contest was held at the Nikos Galis Olympic Indoor Hall, and consisted of a semi-final on 18 May, and the final on 20 May 2006. The two live shows were presented by Maria Menounos and Sakis Rouvas.[2]

Eurovision Song Contest 2006
Feel the Rhythm
Eurovision Song Contest 2006 logo.svg
Dates
Semi-final18 May 2006 (2006-05-18)
Final20 May 2006 (2006-05-20)
Host
VenueNikos Galis Olympic Indoor Hall
Athens, Greece
Presenter(s)
Directed byVolker Weicker
Executive supervisorSvante Stockselius
Executive producerFotini Yannoulatou
Host broadcasterHellenic Broadcasting Corporation (ERT)
Opening act
  • Semi-final: Eurovision medley performed by Greek gods and goddesses;
  • "Love Shine a Light" performed by Sakis Rouvas and Maria Menounos
  • Final: "The Mermaid Song" performed by Foteini Darra accompanied by Greek dancers;
  • "My Number One" performed by Helena Paparizou
Interval act
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/athens-2006 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries37
Debuting countries Armenia
Returning countriesNone
Non-returning countries
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Italy in the Eurovision Song ContestNetherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Monaco in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestSpain in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Austria in the Eurovision Song ContestFrance in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Serbia and Montenegro in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Estonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Slovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestHungary in the Eurovision Song ContestRomania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Lithuania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Poland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Macedonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Latvia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Ukraine in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Albania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Andorra in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Belarus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Bulgaria in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Moldova in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006Armenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2006A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Did not qualify from the semi final     Countries that participated in the past but not in 2006
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8–1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul pointsNone
Winning song
2005 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 2007

Thirty-seven countries participated in the contest. Armenia took part for the first time this year. Meanwhile, Austria, Hungary, and Serbia and Montenegro announced their non-participations in the contest for various reasons. Serbia and Montenegro had intended to participate, however, due to a scandal in the national selection, tensions were caused between the Serbian broadcaster, RTS, and the Montenegrin broadcaster, RTCG. Despite of this, the nation did retain voting rights for the contest.

The winner was Finland with the song "Hard Rock Hallelujah", performed by Lordi and written by lead singer Mr. Lordi a.k.a. Tomi Petteri Putaansuu. This was Finland's first victory in the contest - and first top five placing - in 45 years of participation. It was the first ever hard rock / heavy metal music song to win the contest, and Lordi was the first band to win since 1997. Russia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Romania and Sweden rounded out the top five. Bosnia and Herzegovina achieved their best result in their Eurovision history. Further down the table, Lithuania also achieved their best result to date, finishing sixth. Of the "Big Four" countries Germany placed the highest, finishing joint fourteenth (with Norway).

The contest saw the 1,000th song performed in the contest, when Ireland's Brian Kennedy performed "Every Song Is a Cry for Love" in the semi-final.

LocationEdit

The contest took place in Athens, Greece, following the country's victory at the 2005 edition with the song "My Number One", performed by Helena Paparizou. It was the first time Greece hosted the contest.[3]

VenueEdit

 
Olympic Indoor Hall, Athens - host venue of the 2006 contest.

The venue that was chosen as the host venue was the Nikos Galis Olympic Indoor Hall (in 2006 it was named as Olympic Indoor Arena), which is located in the Athens Olympic Sports Complex, in the capital city of Greece. Completed in 1995, it was the largest indoor venue used at the 2004 Summer Olympics when hosted gymnastics and the basketball finals and the 2004 Summer Paralympics when hosted the whelchair basketball.[4]

Bidding phaseEdit

Locations of the candidate cities: the chosen host city is marked in blue, while the eliminated cities are marked in red.

When Greece won the 2005 contest, the Head of the Greek Delegation, Fotini Yiannoulatou, said that ERT was ready to host the event in Athens the next year. However, multiple cities bid to host the 2006 contest, including Thessaloniki and Patras, the second and the third largest city in Greece, respectively. The majors of the three cities (Athens, Thessaloniki, Patras) were said that their cities were ready to host the event. The venues that were rumored for each city were Olympic Indoor Hall for Athens, Pylea Sports Hall for Thessaloniki and Dimitris Tofalos Arena for Patras.[5][6]

Few days after Greece's won in the contest, the Greek public broadcaster stated that “ERT intends to hold the Eurovision Song Contest in Athens, taking into account EBU's already expressed wish for the event to be combined with the Olympic facilities and amenities that the city of Athens has to offer”. Mr. Panaghiotis Psomiadis, the Prefect of Thessaloniki stated the city will fight for the hosting of the contest.[5] As the city of Patras seemed not to be available to host the contest, at the end it was a two-horse race between Athens and Thessaloniki.

Finally, on June 30, 2005, ERT and EBU announced that Athens will be the host city of the 2006 contest, despite the opposition of some Greek politicians, stated that Athens already had its promotion during the 2004 Summer Olympics and that it's “another city's turn now”. The joint decision of the EBU and ERT is to host the 51st Eurovision Song Contest in Athens, which has several modern Olympic venues, infrastructure and a proven ability to host events of this size.[7]

Other sitesEdit

The Eurovision Village was the official Eurovision Song Contest fan and sponsors' area during the events week. There it was possible to watch performances by local artists, as well as the live shows broadcast from the main venue. Located at the Zappeion, it was open from 15 to 21 May 2006.[8][9]

The EuroClub was the venue for the official after-parties and private performances by contest participants. Unlike the Eurovision Village, access to the EuroClub was restricted to accredited fans, delegates, and press. It was located at Athens Technopolis, an industrial museum and a major cultural venue of the city.[8]

The official "Welcome and Opening Ceremonies" events, where the contestants and their delegations are presented before the accredited press and fans, took place also in Zappeon on 15 May 2006 at 21:00 EET, followed by the Opening Ceremony.[8]

FormatEdit

Visual designEdit

The official logo of the contest remained the same from 2004 and 2005 with the country's flag in the heart being changed. The 2006 sub-logo created by the design company Karamela for Greek television was apparently based on the Phaistos Disc which is a popular symbol of ancient Greece. According to ERT, it was "inspired by the wind and the sea, the golden sunlight and the glow of the sand". Following Istanbul's "Under The Same Sky" and Kyiv's "Awakening", the slogan for the 2006 show was "Feel The Rhythm". This theme was also the basis for the postcards for the 2006 show, which emphasized Greece's historical significance as well as being a major modern tourist destination.[10]

The stage for the contest was designed by Greek stage designer Elias Ledakis. He would go on to design the stage for the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2013 in Kyiv, Ukraine.[11] The stage was a replica of an ancient Greek amphitheatre.[12][13]

PostcardsEdit

As it was referred, the theme "Feel The Rhythm" was also the basis for the postcards, which emphasized Greece's historical significance as well as being a major modern tourist destination. The postcards filmed between March and April 2006. The host broadcaster ERT spent 3 million euros on the production of the 37 postcards. Fanis Papathanisiou of ERT said: “An impressive, international tourism campaign is expensive as well. The Eurovision Song Contest is a perfect platform to achieve equal or even better results. That's why it is worth the investment”. To decide what to show in the postcards, ERT hold surveys in all participating countries, asking what people associate Greece with.[14]

VotingEdit

To save time in the final, the voting time lasted ten minutes and the voting process was changed: points 1-7 were shown immediately on-screen. The spokespersons only announced the countries scoring 8, 10 and 12 points. Despite this being intended to speed proceedings up, there were still problems during voting – EBU imaging over-rode Maria Menounos during a segment in the voting interval and some scoreboards were slow to load. The Dutch spokesperson Paul de Leeuw also caused problems, giving his mobile number to presenter Rouvas during the Dutch results,[15] and slowing down proceedings, also by announcing the first seven points. Constantinos Christoforou (who also represented Cyprus in 1996, 2002 and 2005) saluted from "Nicosia, the last divided capital in Europe"; during Cyprus' reading, the telecast displayed Switzerland by mistake. This voting process has been criticized because suspense was lost by only reading three votes instead of ten. And for the first and only time before the Prespa agreement, the display for the Macedonian entry had the title spelled out in its entirety (as "Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia") instead of being abbreviated as it has been in previous years (as "FYR Macedonia").

PresentersEdit

Initially, the Hellenic Broadcasting Corporation (ERT) asked Sakis Rouvas to represent again Greece in Athens, an offer which he didn't accept. With the Greek broadcaster wanting Rouvas' involvement in the contest, they offered him to be one of the hosts of the contest, where he accepted. Between the names that were rumored for the female host, included the Greek Canadian actress, screenwriter, director, and producer Nia Vardalos (known for writing and starring in My Big Fat Greek Wedding), the Greek social entrepreneur and philanthropist Elizabeth Filippouli (later, she founded the Global Thinkers Forum in London), the Greek American actress, producer, and businesswoman Jennifer Aniston (world-known for her role as Rachel Green on the television sitcom Friends (1994–2004), for which she earned Primetime Emmy, Golden Globe, and Screen Actors Guild awards), all three of them having Greek roots, and the previous edition's winner, Helena Paparizou.[16]

After a lot of speculations, the Greek broadcaster announced on 7 March 2006 that the Greek American entertainment reporter, television personality, professional wrestler, actress, and businesswoman Maria Menounos will be the hostess of the contest. Menounos was starring along with Sean Connery in the movie remake video game James Bond 007: From Russia with love, while in 2002 she joined the NBC show Entertainment Tonight.[17]

Menounos and Rouvas, will also host the allocation draw on March 21, 2006, in order to determine the running order for the semi-final, the grand final and - for the first time in the history of the contest - the voting order.[18][19]

The "Welcome to the Party" opening ceremony was hosted by actress Zeta Makrypoulia and actor/screenwriter of the show, Giorgos Kapoutzidis, while Ioanna Papanikolopoulou was moderated the press conferences.[20]

Opening and interval actsEdit

 
Nana Mouskouri appeared as a guest in the grand final.

The semi-final opened with a medley of former Eurovision songs performed by Greek gods: "Welcome to the Party" (runner-up at the Ellinikós Telikós 2006) of Anna Vissi performed by Muses, "Nel blu, dipinto di blu" (Italy 1958) of Domenico Modugno performed by Zeus, "L'amour est bleu" (Luxembourg 1967) of Vicky Leandros performed by Poseidon, "Save Your Kisses for Me" (United Kingdom 1976) of Brotherhood of Man performed by Hermes, "Making Your Mind Up" (United Kingdom 1981) of Bucks Fizz performed by Athena, "A-Ba-Ni-Bi" (Israel 1978) of Izhar Cohen & The Alphabeta performed by Hephaestus, "Dschinghis Khan" (Germany 1979) of Dschinghis Khan performed by Ares, "Diva" (Israel 1998) of Dana International performed by Aphrodite, "Waterloo" (Sweden 1974) of ABBA performed by Charites, "Wild Dances" (Ukraine 2004) of Ruslana performed by Artemis and "My Number One" (Greece 2005) of Helena Paparizou performed by the ensemble cast of the Greek gods. In addition, the hosts Maria Menounos and Sakis Rouvas sang the winning song of the 1997 contest, "Love Shine a Light" of Katrina and the Waves, representing the United Kingdom.

The grand final opened with a ballet dance, symbolizing the birth of Greece. Greek singer Foteini Darra performed "The Mermaid Song" (also known as "The Song of Life"), while the dancers and the sets mimicked the creative elements (the sea, the wind, the sun). At the end of the ballet, the presenters appeared in the air, suspended from ropes. They landed on the stage and greeted the audience. They immediately introduced the previous year's winner, Helena Paparizou, who covered her winning song, "My Number One".

The interval act of the semi-final began with the English cover of the song "S'eho Erotefthi", performed as "I’m In Love With You" from the host Sakis Rouvas. A folkloric ballet followed, using traditional Greek music and dances, with the pan flute as a conducting element. This ballet was composed by Dimitris Papadimitriou and choreographed by Fokas Evangelinos, while for the grand final, Helena Paparizou performed her song "Mambo!", already a hit in Greece. The interval act closed with a contemporary ballet entitled 4000 Years of Greek Song and which traced the history of the musical culture of the host country. This ballet was also composed by Dimitris Papadimitriou and choreographed by Fokas Evangelinos.

The voting lines for both shows opened by three special guests: for the semi-final the lines opened by Emilia Tsoulfa (Gold medalist in Athens 2004 at 470 class sailing representing Greece) and Dimosthenis Tampakos (Greek gymnast and Olympic gold medalist) and for the grand final the lines opened from the Luxembourgish entrant at the 1963 contest, Nana Mouskouri.

Participating countriesEdit

All participating countries in a Eurovision Song Contest must be active members of the EBU.

The EBU initially announced on 16 January 2006 that thirty-eight countries would participate in the contest,[21] with Austria opting not to participate due to the bad result at the previous contest[22] and Hungary also deciding not to participate due to financial reasons.[23] Armenia participated for the very first time in the history of the contest.[24]

Serbia and Montenegro announced its withdrawal on 15 March 2006, reducing the participants number from 38 to 37.[25]

Returning artistsEdit

Lead artistsEdit

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Anna Vissi   Greece 1980 (along with the Epikouri) and 1982 (for   Cyprus)
Carola   Sweden 1983 and 1991
Eddie Butler   Israel 1999 (as a member of Eden)
Fabrizio Faniello   Malta 2001
Ich Troje   Poland 2003
Victor Diawara (part of LT United)   Lithuania 2001 (as a member of Skamp)

Backing performersEdit

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Sigga   Iceland 1990 (as member of Stjórnin), 1992 (as member of Heart 2 Heart), and 1994
Pétur Örn Guðmundsson 2000 (as backing singer for August & Telma)

Additionally, Hari Mata Hari were selected to represented Bosnia and Herzegovina in the 1999 contest, but their entry was disqualified. Ireland's Brian Kennedy performed in Lumen, the interval act of the 1995 contest.

Host Sakis Rouvas previously represented Greece at the 2004 contest. If No Name had been permitted to represent Serbia and Montenegro, they would have done so for the second consecutive year.

ResultsEdit

Semi-finalEdit

The semi-final was held on 18 May 2006 at 21:00 (CET). 23 countries performed and all 37 participants and Serbia and Montenegro voted.

Draw Country Artist Song Language[26] Place[27] Points
01   Armenia André "Without Your Love" English 6 150
02   Bulgaria Mariana Popova "Let Me Cry" English 17 36
03   Slovenia Anžej Dežan "Mr Nobody" English 16 49
04   Andorra Jenny "Sense tu" Catalan 23 8
05   Belarus Polina Smolova "Mum" English 22 10
06   Albania Luiz Ejlli "Zjarr e ftohtë" Albanian 14 58
07   Belgium Kate Ryan "Je t'adore" English 12 69
08   Ireland Brian Kennedy "Every Song Is a Cry for Love" English 9 79
09   Cyprus Annet Artani "Why Angels Cry" English 15 57
10   Monaco Séverine Ferrer "La Coco-Dance" French, Tahitian 21 14
11   Macedonia Elena Risteska "Ninanajna" (Нинанајна) English, Macedonian 10 76
12   Poland Ich Troje feat. Real McCoy "Follow My Heart" English, Polish, German, Russian[a] 11 70
13   Russia Dima Bilan "Never Let You Go" English 3 217
14   Turkey Sibel Tüzün "Süper Star" Turkish 8 91
15   Ukraine Tina Karol "Show Me Your Love" English 7 146
16   Finland Lordi "Hard Rock Hallelujah" English 1 292
17   Netherlands Treble "Amambanda" English, Imaginary 20 22
18   Lithuania LT United "We Are the Winners" English[b] 5 163
19   Portugal Nonstop "Coisas de nada" Portuguese, English 19 26
20   Sweden Carola "Invincible" English 4 214
21   Estonia Sandra Oxenryd "Through My Window" English 18 28
22   Bosnia and Herzegovina Hari Mata Hari "Lejla" Bosnian 2 267
23   Iceland Silvia Night "Congratulations" English 13 62

FinalEdit

The finalists were:

The final was held on 20 May 2006 at 21:00 (CET) and was won by Finland.

Draw Country Artist Song Language[26] Place[28] Points
01    Switzerland six4one "If We All Give a Little" English 16 30
02   Moldova Arsenium and Natalia Gordienko "Loca" English[a] 20 22
03   Israel Eddie Butler "Together We Are One" Hebrew, English 23 4
04   Latvia Vocal Group Cosmos "I Hear Your Heart" English 16 30
05   Norway Christine Guldbrandsen "Alvedansen" Norwegian 14 36
06   Spain Las Ketchup "Un Blodymary" Spanish 21 18
07   Malta Fabrizio Faniello "I Do" English 24 1
08   Germany Texas Lightning "No No Never" English 14 36
09   Denmark Sidsel Ben Semmane "Twist of Love" English 18 26
10   Russia Dima Bilan "Never Let You Go" English 2 248
11   Macedonia Elena Risteska "Ninanajna" (Нинанајна) English, Macedonian 12 56
12   Romania Mihai Trăistariu "Tornerò" English, Italian 4 172
13   Bosnia and Herzegovina Hari Mata Hari "Lejla" Bosnian 3 229
14   Lithuania LT United "We Are the Winners" English[b] 6 162
15   United Kingdom Daz Sampson "Teenage Life" English 19 25
16   Greece Anna Vissi "Everything" English 9 128
17   Finland Lordi "Hard Rock Hallelujah" English 1 292
18   Ukraine Tina Karol "Show Me Your Love" English 7 145
19   France Virginie Pouchain "Il était temps" French 22 5
20   Croatia Severina "Moja štikla" Croatian 12 56
21   Ireland Brian Kennedy "Every Song Is a Cry for Love" English 10 93
22   Sweden Carola "Invincible" English 5 170
23   Turkey Sibel Tüzün "Süper Star" Turkish, English[d] 11 91
24   Armenia André "Without Your Love" English 8 129

ScoreboardEdit

Televoting was used in all nations except Monaco and Albania. Monaco used a jury as the chances of getting enough votes needed to validate the votes were low. Albania used a jury since there were problems with their televote. In the semi final, Monaco and Albania used the jury voting due to insufficient televoting numbers. Coincidentally, Albania and Monaco were two of the three countries that did not vote for the winning entry, the third one was Armenia.

Semi-finalEdit

Semi-final voting results[29]
Voting procedure used:
  100% Televoting
  100% Jury vote
Total score
Slovenia
Andorra
Romania
Denmark
Latvia
Portugal
Sweden
Finland
Belgium
Croatia
Serbia and Montenegro
Norway
Estonia
Ireland
Malta
Lithuania
Cyprus
Netherlands
Switzerland
Ukraine
Russia
Poland
United Kingdom
Armenia
France
Belarus
Germany
Spain
Moldova
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Iceland
Monaco
Israel
Albania
Greece
Bulgaria
Macedonia
Turkey
Contestants
Armenia 150 2 3 12 12 12 3 7 12 3 3 12 7 7 12 2 10 3 10 8 10
Bulgaria 36 1 8 4 5 8 3 6 1
Slovenia 49 1 6 7 5 2 2 2 7 3 4 7 3
Andorra 8 8
Belarus 10 1 6 3
Albania 58 1 2 7 3 10 2 2 1 3 5 7 12 3
Belgium 69 5 7 3 2 5 3 3 5 7 2 1 7 4 3 2 4 6
Ireland 79 3 5 4 4 1 4 3 1 6 6 6 4 3 2 1 2 8 1 2 7 5 1
Cyprus 57 4 4 1 3 7 7 1 2 10 4 12 2
Monaco 14 3 2 1 8
Macedonia 76 8 1 8 10 6 8 10 12 5 8
Poland 70 3 1 2 7 1 8 2 10 5 1 3 2 4 6 4 4 3 2 2
Russia 217 4 4 7 1 12 7 7 6 2 3 6 4 10 4 8 12 10 1 12 8 12 12 5 12 4 6 12 5 12 5 4
Turkey 91 10 6 8 1 10 8 10 8 12 3 6 1 8
Ukraine 146 2 6 8 6 10 2 2 5 4 3 3 6 6 10 6 10 10 3 10 3 5 2 8 4 3 2 7
Finland 292 10 10 5 10 8 8 12 10 10 8 8 12 10 10 10 7 6 5 6 8 12 12 5 8 12 10 5 8 12 7 8 7 7 6
Netherlands 22 2 4 1 3 4 1 2 5
Lithuania 163 6 5 3 4 10 5 4 8 7 5 3 5 8 12 4 5 5 4 10 10 6 1 6 2 8 4 1 6 4 2
Portugal 26 12 7 7
Sweden 214 7 8 6 12 5 12 10 5 4 4 10 7 8 12 5 2 4 4 4 3 7 6 6 5 4 7 7 6 10 8 6 5 4 1
Estonia 28 2 7 8 5 1 5
Bosnia and Herzegovina 267 12 1 12 8 2 6 10 12 6 12 12 12 1 6 2 3 5 8 12 8 7 5 4 5 6 3 10 1 8 7 12 1 10 6 10 10 12
Iceland 62 7 1 3 6 7 1 2 7 5 2 7 5 1 6 1 1

12 pointsEdit

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the semi-final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
9   Bosnia and Herzegovina   Croatia,   Finland,   Monaco,   Norway,   Romania,   Serbia and Montenegro,   Slovenia,    Switzerland,   Turkey
8   Russia   Armenia,   Belarus,   Bulgaria,   Israel,   Latvia,   Lithuania,   Moldova,   Ukraine
6   Armenia   Belgium,   Cyprus,   France,   Netherlands,   Russia,   Spain
  Finland   Estonia,   Germany,   Iceland,   Poland,   Sweden,   United Kingdom
3   Sweden   Denmark,   Malta,   Portugal
1   Albania   Macedonia
  Cyprus   Greece
  Lithuania   Ireland
  Macedonia   Albania
  Portugal   Andorra
  Turkey   Bosnia and Herzegovina

FinalEdit

Final voting results[30]
Voting procedure used:
  100% Televoting
  100% Jury vote
Total score
Slovenia
Andorra
Romania
Denmark
Latvia
Portugal
Sweden
Finland
Belgium
Croatia
Serbia and Montenegro
Norway
Estonia
Ireland
Malta
Lithuania
Cyprus
Netherlands
Switzerland
Ukraine
Russia
Poland
United Kingdom
Armenia
France
Belarus
Germany
Spain
Moldova
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Iceland
Monaco
Israel
Albania
Greece
Bulgaria
Macedonia
Turkey
Contestants
Switzerland 30 1 12 3 4 6 4
Moldova 22 12 3 3 2 1 1
Israel 4 4
Latvia 30 3 4 8 4 1 2 8
Norway 36 1 6 2 5 3 7 1 1 3 4 1 2
Spain 18 12 6
Malta 1 1
Germany 36 3 3 1 1 3 3 7 5 5 5
Denmark 26 8 3 6 1 8
Russia 248 4 6 8 2 12 7 7 12 3 7 5 3 10 5 5 12 8 2 12 10 1 12 2 12 6 7 10 6 5 12 4 8 10 8 5
Macedonia 56 6 8 8 4 7 8 3 6 6
Romania 172 5 3 6 2 10 6 6 2 5 4 4 4 6 10 1 10 1 1 4 3 6 4 7 3 5 12 12 2 2 10 2 7 2 2 3
Bosnia and Herzegovina 229 12 7 8 2 10 10 6 12 12 8 2 4 2 8 12 10 6 4 5 6 4 7 1 5 3 12 2 12 6 7 12 12
Lithuania 162 3 7 7 10 4 3 8 4 6 3 5 8 12 1 4 6 5 5 8 10 6 1 4 4 10 7 3 4 1 3
United Kingdom 25 2 4 1 1 2 2 8 3 1 1
Greece 128 1 10 4 1 10 6 8 3 12 5 5 7 8 5 2 8 1 1 8 12 7 4
Finland 292 8 10 4 12 8 6 12 8 10 7 12 12 10 7 10 5 7 8 7 8 12 12 8 7 10 10 6 7 12 7 12 5 6 7
Ukraine 145 2 5 3 5 12 1 2 4 2 5 1 2 7 6 1 10 6 10 10 3 8 5 6 2 6 5 3 5 8
France 5 2 3
Croatia 56 10 10 6 2 12 4 10 2
Ireland 93 1 4 2 5 4 5 5 4 2 7 6 4 6 4 3 2 2 8 3 1 4 1 10
Sweden 170 7 8 5 10 7 8 7 5 3 1 10 7 7 6 5 2 6 2 7 4 6 3 5 6 2 3 7 5 5 10 1
Turkey 91 6 7 12 10 3 12 12 10 1 7 3 4 4
Armenia 129 1 12 2 7 10 8 12 5 10 8 3 8 7 8 10 8 10

12 pointsEdit

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
8   Bosnia and Herzegovina   Albania,   Croatia,   Macedonia,   Monaco,   Serbia and Montenegro,   Slovenia,    Switzerland,   Turkey
  Finland   Denmark,   Estonia,   Greece,   Iceland,   Norway,   Poland,   Sweden,   United Kingdom
7   Russia   Armenia,   Belarus,   Finland,   Israel,   Latvia,   Lithuania,   Ukraine
3   Turkey   France,   Germany,   Netherlands
2   Armenia   Belgium,   Russia
  Greece   Bulgaria,   Cyprus
  Romania   Moldova,   Spain
1   Croatia   Bosnia and Herzegovina
  Lithuania   Ireland
  Moldova   Romania
  Spain   Andorra
   Switzerland   Malta
  Ukraine   Portugal

Other countriesEdit

RatingsEdit

After the contest, EBU officials stated that the overall ratings for the Semi-Final were 35% higher than in 2005, and for the Final had risen by 28%.[36]

In France, average market shares reached 30.3%, up by 8% over the 2005 figure. Other countries that showed a rise in average market shares included Germany with 38% (up from 29%), United Kingdom with 37.5% (up from 36%), Spain with 36% (up from 35%), Ireland with 58% (up from 35%) and Sweden, which reached over 80% compared to 57% the year previously.[36]

Voting revenues had also risen from the Kyiv contest, and the official Eurovision website, www.eurovision.tv, reported visits from over 200 countries and over 98 million page views, compared with 85 million in 2005.

AftermathEdit

ERT's net income from the Eurovision event amounted to 7,280,000 euros, while the cost of the entire event reached 5,500,000 euros, said on Thursday in a press conference the president of ERT, Christos Panagopoulos and the authorized consultant George Chouliaras, who stated: "The allegations about the waste of money of the Greek taxpayer do not apply. The Greek people did not pay a penny for the event. It was a commercial and profitable event and the money we spent was donor money".[36][37]

According to G. Chouliaras, the revenues that ERT had from the event were 3,630,000 euros from national sponsors, 2,200,000 euros from tickets and 1,450,000 euros from the share of international sponsors, advertising revenues outside sponsorships, sms, etc.[36][37]

Regarding the costs paid by ERT for the event together with the EBU, it amounted to a total of 9 million euros, of which 5.5 million euros were paid by ERT and 3.5 million euros by the EBU. These costs include the costs for the television production, the production of the artistic program, the technical production, the payment of contributions, the organization of the competition and any other direct costs related to the organization of Eurovision 2006. It is also noted that EOT paid for the production of 47 commercials and their promotion during the semifinals and the final 3.5 million euros.[36][37]

Spectacles and rewardsEdit

The president of ERT, Christos Panagopoulos, clarified, however, that the total cost does not include the shows that started in February for the advertising support of the event, for which he estimated that their cost will not exceed 1 million euros. He stated that in essence the net profit of ERT amounts to 745,000 euros, which will be allocated for other cultural events.[36]

It was also clarified that ERT did not pay anything to Anna Vissi, nor to Nikos Karvelas, as well as did not pay for the dress of Anna Vissi. Chouliaras stressed that all the participants of the event were paid at market prices and in particular Zeta Makrypoulia and Giorgos Kapoutzidis received 8-10 thousand euros per month for their four-month employment, Sakis Rouvas 50,000 euros and Maria Menounos 45,000 euros.[36][37]

It was also clarified that the costs of the "promotour" of Anna Vissi are included in the total cost and that from these the transfers were covered by Olympic Airlines and the hotels, the cost of which amounted to 150,000 euros, by the sponsors.[36]

Regarding the future, Giorgos Chouliaras noted that "ERT should have a dynamic participation in the next Eurovision Song Contests and not devalue the institution, since it is a television product watched by 3.5 million Greeks".[36]

Broadcasters, commentators and spokespersonsEdit

SpokespersonsEdit

The following people were the spokespersons for their countries. A spokesperson delivers the results of national televoting during the final night, awarding points to the entries on behalf of his or her country.[38] Although Serbia and Montenegro withdrew from the contest, it retained its voting rights.[27] A draw was held to determine each country's voting order. Countries revealed their votes in the following order:

  1.   SloveniaPeter Poles
  2.   AndorraXavi Palma
  3.   RomaniaAndreea Marin Bănică (Presenter of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2006)
  4.   DenmarkJørgen de Mylius
  5.   LatviaMārtiņš Freimanis (Latvian singer in the 2003 contest as part of F.L.Y.)
  6.   PortugalCristina Alves
  7.   SwedenJovan Radomir
  8.   FinlandNina Tapio
  9.   BelgiumYasmine
  10.   CroatiaMila Horvat
  11.   Serbia and MontenegroJovana Janković (later co-presenter of the 2008 contest)
  12.   NorwayIngvild Helljesen
  13.   EstoniaEvelin Samuel (Estonian singer in the 1999 contest)
  14.   IrelandEimear Quinn (Irish winner of the 1996 contest)
  15.   MaltaMoira Delia (Presenter of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2014)
  16.   LithuaniaLavija Šurnaitė
  17.   CyprusConstantinos Christoforou (Cypriot singer in the 1996, 2002 and 2005 contests)
  18.   NetherlandsPaul de Leeuw
  19.    SwitzerlandJubaira Bachmann
  20.   UkraineIgor Posypaiko
  21.   RussiaYana Churikova
  22.   PolandMaciej Orłoś
  23.   United KingdomFearne Cotton
  24.   ArmeniaGohar Gasparyan (Co-presenter of the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2011)
  25.   FranceSophie Jovillard
  26.   BelarusCorrianna
  27.   GermanyThomas Hermanns
  28.   SpainSonia Ferrer
  29.   MoldovaSvetlana Cocoş
  30.   Bosnia and HerzegovinaVesna Andree-Zaimović
  31.   IcelandRagnhildur Steinunn Jónsdóttir
  32.   MonacoÉglantine Eméyé
  33.   IsraelDana Herman [he]
  34.   AlbaniaLeon Menkshi
  35.   GreeceAlexis Kostalas [el]
  36.   BulgariaDragomir Simeonov
  37.   MacedoniaMartin Vučić (Macedonian singer in the 2005 contest)
  38.   TurkeyMeltem Yazgan

Broadcasters and commentatorsEdit

All participating broadcasters may choose to have on-site or remote commentators providing an insight about the show to their local audience and, while they must broadcast at least the semi-final they are voting in and the final, most broadcasters air all three shows with different programming plans. Similarly, some non-participating broadcasters may still want to air the contest. These are the broadcasters that have confirmed their broadcasting plans and/or their commentators:

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Show(s) Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
  Albania All shows TVSH Leon Menkshi
  Andorra All shows RTVA Meri Picart and Josep Lluís Trabal
  Armenia All shows Public Television Gohar Gasparyan and Phelix Khachatryan
  Belarus All shows Belarus 1 Denis Dudinskiy [39]
  Belgium All shows één Dutch: André Vermeulen and Bart Peeters [40]
Radio 2 Dutch: Michel Follet and Sven Pichal
La Une French: Jean-Pierre Hautier
La Première French: Patrick Duhamel and Thomas Gunzig
  Bosnia and Herzegovina All shows BHT1 Dejan Kukrić [41]
  Bulgaria All shows BNT Elena Rosberg and Georgi Kushvaliev
  Croatia All shows HRT Duško Čurlić [42]
  Cyprus Semi-final RIK 1 Evi Papamichail and Pampina Themistokleous [43]
Final Evi Papamichail and Vasso Komninou
  Denmark All shows DR1 Mads Vangsø and Adam Duvå Hall [44]
  Estonia All shows ERR Marko Reikop [45]
  Finland All shows YLE TV2 Finnish: Heikki Paasonen, Jaana Pelkonen and Asko Murtomäki [46][47]
YLE Radio Suomi Finnish: Sanna Kojo and Jorma Hietamäki
YLE FST Swedish: Thomas Lundin
  France Semi-final France 4 Peggy Olmi and Éric Jean-Jean [40]
Final France 3 Michel Drucker, Claudy Siar
France Bleu Alexandre Devoise
  Germany All shows Das Erste Peter Urban [48][49]
Deutschlandfunk/NDR 2 Thomas Mohr
  Greece All shows ERT, NET Zeta Makrypoulia and Giorgos Kapoutzidis [50]
Second Programme Maria Kozakou [51]
  Iceland All shows Sjónvarpið Sigmar Guðmundsson [52]
  Ireland All shows RTÉ One Marty Whelan [53]
Final RTÉ Radio 1 Larry Gogan
  Israel All shows IBA No commentary
  Latvia All shows LTV Kārlis Streips
  Lithuania All shows LRT Darius Užkuraitis
  Malta All shows TVM Eileen Montesin [54]
  Moldova All shows TRM Vitalie Rotaru
  Monaco All shows TMC Monte Carlo Bernard Montiel and Églantine Eméyé [55]
  Netherlands All shows Nederland 2 Cornald Maas and Paul de Leeuw [56]
Radio 2 Ron Stoeltie
  Macedonia All shows MRT Karolina Petkovska
  Norway All shows NRK1 Jostein Pedersen [57]
  Poland All shows TVP1 Artur Orzech [58]
  Portugal All shows RTP1 Eládio Clímaco [59]
  Romania All shows TVR1 Andreea Demirgian
  Russia All shows C1R Yuri Aksyuta and Tatiana Godunova
  Slovenia All shows RTV SLO Mojca Mavec
  Spain All shows TVE1 Beatriz Pécker [60]
  Sweden All shows SVT1 Pekka Heino [61][62]
SR P3 Carolina Norén and Björn Kjellman
   Switzerland All shows SF zwei German: Sandra Studer
TSR 1 French: Jean-Marc Richard and Alain Morisod
TSI 2 Italian: Sandy Altermatt and Claudio Lazzarino
  Turkey All shows TRT 1 Bülend Özveren
  Ukraine All shows First National TV Channel Pavlo Shylko
  United Kingdom Semi-final BBC Three Paddy O'Connell
Final BBC One Terry Wogan
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Show(s) Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
  Australia All shows SBS TBC [63]
  Austria All shows ORF2 Andi Knoll [64]
  Azerbaijan All shows İctimai TBC [65][66]
  Gibraltar Final GBC TBC [67]
  Italy All shows TBC TBC [68]
  Serbia and Montenegro All shows RTS1 Serbian: Duška Vučinić-Lučić
TVCG 2 Montenegrin: Dražen Bauković and Tamara Ivanković

International broadcastsEdit

  •   Australia – Although Australia was not itself eligible to enter, the semi-final and final were broadcast on SBS. As is the case each year, they were not however broadcast live due to the difference in Australian time zones. Australia aired the United Kingdom's broadcast, including commentary from Paddy O'Connell and Terry Wogan. Before the broadcasts, viewers were told by an SBS host that the Eurovision Song Contest was one of their most popular programmes. The final rated an estimated 462,000, and was ranked 21st of the broadcaster's top rating programs for the 2005/06 financial year.[63]
  •   AzerbaijanAzerbaijan were willing to enter the contest but since AzTV applied for active EBU membership but was denied on June 18, 2007, they missed the contest and had to wait until they were accepted. Another Azerbaijan broadcaster, İctimai, broadcast the contest. It was a passive EBU member, and had broadcast it for the last 2 years. It was the only non-participating broadcaster this year to send its own commentators to the contest.[66]
  •   GibraltarGibraltar screened only the final on GBC.[67]
  •   Italy – Italian television did not enter because RAI, the national broadcaster, is in strong competition with commercial TV stations and they believe that the Eurovision Song Contest would not be a popular show in Italy. They have not broadcast the contest in recent years, although an independent Italian channel for the gay community has shown it.[68]

A live broadcast of the Eurovision Song Contest was broadcast worldwide by satellite through Eurovision streams such as Channel One Russia, ERT World, TVE Internacional, TVP Polonia, RTP Internacional and TVR i. The official Eurovision Song Contest website also provided a live stream without commentary using the peer-to-peer transport Octoshape.

Other awardsEdit

In addition to the main winner's trophy, the Marcel Bezençon Awards and the Barbara Dex Award were contested during the 2006 Eurovision Song Contest.

Marcel Bezençon AwardsEdit

The Marcel Bezençon Awards honour the best competing songs in the final. Named after the founder of the contest, the awards were created and first handed at the 2002 contest by Christer Björkman (Sweden's representative in the 1992 contest and the country's current Head of Delegation), and Richard Herrey (a member of the Herreys who won the 1984 contest for Sweden).[69] The awards are divided into three categories: Artistic Award which was voted by previous winners of the contest, Composer Award, and Press Award.[70]

Category Country Song Performer(s) Composer(s) Final result Points
Artistic Award   Sweden "Invincible" Carola Thomas G:son, Bobby Ljunggren,
Henrik Wikström, Carola
5th 170
Composer Award   Bosnia and Herzegovina "Lejla" Hari Mata Hari Željko Joksimović,
Fahrudin Pecikoza, Dejan Ivanović
3rd 229
Press Award   Finland "Hard Rock Hallelujah" Lordi Mr. Lordi 1st 292

Barbara Dex AwardEdit

The Barbara Dex Award is a humorous fan award given to the worst dressed artist each year. Named after Belgium's representative who came last in the 1993 contest, wearing her self-designed dress, the award was handed by the fansite House of Eurovision from 1997 to 2016 and is being carried out by the fansite songfestival.be since 2017.

Country Song Performer(s) Composer(s)
  Portugal "Coisas de nada" Nonstop José Manuel Afonso, Elvis Veiguinha

Official albumEdit

Eurovision Song Contest: Athens 2006
 
Compilation album by
Released28 April 2006
GenrePop
Length
  • 53:38 (CD 1)
  • 56:12 (CD 2)
LabelCMC
Eurovision Song Contest chronology
Eurovision Song Contest: Kyiv 2005
(2005)
Eurovision Song Contest: Athens 2006
(2006)
Eurovision Song Contest: Helsinki 2007
(2007)

Eurovision Song Contest: Athens 2006 was the official compilation album of the 2006 contest, put together by the European Broadcasting Union and released by CMC International on 28 April 2006. The album featured all 37 songs that entered in the 2006 contest, including the semi-finalists that failed to qualify into the grand final.[71]

ChartsEdit

Chart (2006) Peak
position
German Compilation Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[72] 2

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b The song also contains words in Spanish.
  2. ^ a b The song also contains phrases in French.
  3. ^ Following Serbia and Montenegro's withdrawal, Croatia took its place as an automatic qualifier.
  4. ^ The songs was performed entirely in Turkish in the semi-final, and with an English chorus in the final.

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit

Coordinates: 37°58′N 23°43′E / 37.967°N 23.717°E / 37.967; 23.717