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Kurier is a German language daily newspaper based in Vienna, Austria.[1]

Kurier
Kurier Logo.svg
Kurier 2012.jpg
Front page of Kurier, 7 November 2012
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBerliner
Owner(s)Printmedienbeteiligungsgesellschaft
Funke Mediengruppe
PublisherKurier-Zeitungsverlag und Druckerei GmbH.
EditorMartina Salomon
Founded1954; 65 years ago (1954)
Political alignmentCentrism
Liberalism
Pro-Europeanism
HeadquartersVienna
Circulation385,000 (2013)
WebsiteKurier
The Kurier Building in Vienna (2019).

History and profileEdit

Kurier was founded as Wiener Kurier by the United States Forces in Austria (USFA) in 1945, during the Allied occupation after World War II. In 1954[2][3] the paper was acquired and re-established by Ludwig Polsterer as Neuer Kurier (New Kurier).[4][5]

Funke Mediengruppe holds 49% of the paper.[6] The company also partly owns Kronen Zeitung.[7] The publisher of Kurier is Kurier-Zeitungsverlag und Druckerei GmbH.[2] Kurier is based in Vienna.[5]

CirculationEdit

Kurier was the eighteenth largest newspaper worldwide with a circulation of 443,000 copies in the late 1980s.[8] It was the third best-selling Austrian newspaper in 1993 with a circulation of 390,000 copies.[9]

The circulation of Kurier was 263,000 copies in 2001.[10] It was the third best selling Austrian newspaper in 2002 with a circulation of 252,000 copies.[11] The daily had a circulation of 254,000 copies in 2004.[12] Its circulation in 2005 was 172,000 copies.[5] The 2007 circulation of the paper was 169,481 copies.[1] It had a circulation of 158,469 copies in 2011.[13] The circulation of the paper was 385,000 copies in 2013.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Science News? Overview of Science Reporting in the EU" (PDF). EU. 2007. Retrieved 5 October 2013.
  2. ^ a b c "Austria 2013". WAN IFRA. Retrieved 25 February 2015.
  3. ^ "European News Resources". NYU Libraries. Retrieved 24 January 2015.
  4. ^ Martina Thiele. "Press freedom and pluralism in Europe". Intellect Books. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  5. ^ a b c "The press in Austria". BBC. 10 November 2005. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  6. ^ "Communications Report 2005" (Report). Rundfunk and Telekom Regulierungs GmbH. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  7. ^ "Media Markets: Austria Country Overview". Russian Telecom. August 2004. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  8. ^ Franz Horner (1996). "Agencies of Socialization". In Volkmar Lauber (ed.). Contemporary Austrian Politics. Boulder, CO: Westview Press. p. 223. Retrieved 1 January 2015. – via Questia (subscription required)
  9. ^ Eric Solsten, ed. (1994). Austria: A Country Study. Washington: GPO for the Library of Congress. Retrieved 23 March 2015.
  10. ^ Adam Smith (15 November 2002). "Europe's Top Papers". campaign. Retrieved 7 February 2015.
  11. ^ "World Press Trends" (PDF). World Association of Newspapers. Paris. 2004. Retrieved 8 February 2015.
  12. ^ "Media pluralism in the Member States of the European Union" (PDF). Commission of the European Communities. Brussels. 16 January 2007. Retrieved 27 March 2015.
  13. ^ Paul C. Murschetz (25 January 2014). State Aid for Newspapers: Theories, Cases, Actions. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 135. ISBN 978-3-642-35691-9. Retrieved 2 December 2014.

External linksEdit