Eurovision Song Contest 1999

The Eurovision Song Contest 1999 was the 44th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Jerusalem, Israel, following the country's victory at the 1998 contest with the song "Diva" by Dana International. It was the second time Israel had hosted the contest, having previously done so in 1979. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA), the contest was held at the International Convention Center with the final on 29 May 1999. The live show was presented by Yigal Ravid, Dafna Dekel and Sigal Shachmon.

Eurovision Song Contest 1999
ESC 1999 logo.jpg
Dates
Final29 May 1999 (1999-05-29)
Host
VenueUssishkin Auditorium at the
International Convention Center
Jerusalem, Israel
Presenter(s)
Directed byHagai Mautner
Executive supervisorChristine Marchal-Ortiz
Executive producerAmnon Barkai
Host broadcasterIsrael Broadcasting Authority (IBA)
Opening actDigital animation "From Birmingham to Jerusalem" transitioning into a film about Jerusalem
Interval act"To Life" by Dafna Dekel & Sigal Shachmon"
"Freedom Calling", with the song "Free" performed in a medley with a version of a traditional prayer for freedom, "Dror Yikra" by Dana International
Reprise actAll acts performed the English version of "Hallelujah" as a tribute to the victims of the Balkan War
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/jerusalem-1999 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries23
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries
Non-returning countries
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Italy in the Eurovision Song ContestNetherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Switzerland in the Eurovision Song ContestGermany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestSpain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Finland in the Eurovision Song ContestNorway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Greece in the Eurovision Song ContestMalta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song ContestMorocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Estonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Slovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestHungary in the Eurovision Song ContestRomania in the Eurovision Song ContestLithuania in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Poland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1999Russia in the Eurovision Song ContestMacedonia in the Eurovision Song ContestA coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1999
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8–1 points to their 10 favourite songs
Nul pointsNone
Winning song
1998 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 2000

Twenty-three countries participated in the contest. It saw the return of Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Denmark and Iceland after being relegated from competing the previous year. Lithuania also returned to the contest, after their last participation in 1994. Finland, Greece, Macedonia, Romania, Slovakia and Switzerland were relegated due to having the lowest average scores over the previous five editions. Hungary decided not to participate, which left a spot open for Portugal, who otherwise would had been relegated from competing. Russia had intended to participate, but were not allowed to, due to not having broadcast the previous year's contest.

The winner was Sweden with the song "Take Me to Your Heaven", performed by Charlotte Nilsson, written by Gert Lengstrand and Marcos Ubeda, and composed by Lars Diedricson. This was Sweden's fourth victory in the contest, following their wins in 1974, 1984 and 1991. Iceland, Germany, Croatia and Israel rounded out the top five. Iceland achieved their best result in the contest at this point. Further down the table, Bosnia and Herzegovina also achieved their best result as a independent country at this point, finishing seventh.

LocationEdit

 
International Convention Center, Jerusalem – host venue of the 1999 contest.

In the run-up to the Contest, many speculated that it would not be held in Israel, but would be moved to either Malta or stay at the United Kingdom (the countries that completed the top 3 of the 1998 Contest). This came about after major concerns over funding for the event from the Israeli government arose, alongside the opposition from Orthodox Jews that they would attempt to stop the Contest from coming to Israel after Dana International won the previous year's Contest. This, however, provided no hindrance for IBA or to the organizing team of the event, and the Ussishkin Auditorium at International Convention Center in Jerusalem was selected as the venue for the 44th Contest.[1]

FormatEdit

Long-standing rules in place for decades were abolished during this Contest: rules that each country had to sing in one of their national languages was abolished for the first time since 1977. A majority of the participating countries, fourteen out of twenty-three, chose to sing entirely or partly in English and only eight entirely in their respective national languages; Lithuania, Spain, Croatia, Poland, France, Cyprus, Portugal and Turkey, not counting the United Kingdom, Ireland and Malta, who have English as a national or official language. Furthermore, live music became optional for the first time in the Contest's history. IBA took advantage of this and decided to drop the orchestra from the Contest as a way to conserve money for the show. This meant that for the first time all entries used backing track during their performances.[2] This caused controversy for Eurovision traditionalists, with two-time winner Johnny Logan criticising the move, describing the event now as "karaoke".[1]

A compilation CD was released in Israel by the host broadcaster and IMP Records. Due to licensing problems, the CD omitted the songs from Poland, Cyprus, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom.[3] Since then, all compilation CDs have featured all the songs.

It was announced in 1999 that, as of the 2000 Contest, the four biggest financial contributors to the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) – Germany, Spain, France and the United Kingdom – would all be given automatic entry into the Contest, regardless of their average scores over the past five years.[1][2]

Latvia had attempted to participate in the contest for the first time, but later withdrew. This gave Hungary a chance to enter the contest, however, Magyar Televízió decided not to take part, allowing Portugal to compete as the 23rd country.[2]

Draw for the order of performances took place on 17 November 1998.[4]

Lithuania returned to the contest for the first time in five years. The Lithuanian delegation had budget problems to contend with, and so the EBU allowed the Lithuanians to arrive in Israel a day later than everyone else. The first delegation on the other hand, to arrive were Estonia.[2]

Russia's Channel One had decided not to broadcast that year's contest, in order to allow for a strong comeback in Israel. However, as only countries which had broadcast the previous year's contest were allowed to enter the next year's contest, Russia was forced to miss another year.

The favourites to win the Contest came from Iceland's Selma with "All Out of Luck", and Cyprus's Marlain with "Tha 'Ne Erotas", after an internet poll by fans. But, while Iceland finished second to Sweden (the country's best showing in the contest), Cyprus failed to inspire televotes, finishing second last with only two points, both from the United Kingdom.[1][2]

Television news anchor Yigal Ravid, singer and 1992 contestant Dafna Dekel and model/actress Sigal Shachmon presented the show, and it was the first time that three presenters were used to host the contest. Israel's two previous winners, Izhar Cohen, who won in 1978 with "A-Ba-Ni-Bi" and Milk and Honey's Gali Atari who won it the next year with "Hallelujah" attended as spectators.

PostcardsEdit

The postcards' theme was "interactive tour in the Land of the Bible". It featured paintings of biblical stories, "coming to life" with a humorous animation (created by cartoonist Yossi Abulafia), and then continuing to modern locations in Israel or modern themes that represent Israel's culture and industries. The various themes were as following, listed in appearance order:

IncidentsEdit

A number of controversies occurred before the Contest. Two songs selected to compete in Israel were found to be ineligible: Bosnia and Herzegovina's Hari Mata Hari were disqualified after their entry was discovered to have been released in Finland some years previously; Germany's Corinna May was also disqualified after her song was revealed to have been released in 1997 by a different singer.[1][5] Both artists would eventually represent their countries in Eurovision, in 2006 and 2002 respectively.

Croatia's entry, Marija Magdalena, attracted objections from the Norwegian delegation, due to synthesised male vocals being used on the backing track of Doris Dragović's entry. The EBU decided to reduce the country's score by a third for the purpose of calculating its five-year average to determine participation in future contests, though it was decided to leave its placement in the 1999 result unaffected.[1][2]

The interval act was provided by Dana International, who performed a cover of the Stevie Wonder song "Free", which although was a smash hit in Israel at the time, caused some controversy there due to the song's lyrics. Dana International also appeared at the end of the show, handing the winning trophy to Nilsson. After pretending that the trophy was too heavy to lift, she fell to the stage, bringing down the winning composers with her.[1][2] After the encore of the winning entry coming from Sweden, the three presenters re-appeared inviting everyone on stage to sing a rendition of the English version of "Hallelujah", the Israeli winner from the 1979 Contest, as a tribute to the victims of the Kosovo War (particularly then-Yugoslavia, which was banned from participation as penalty due this conflict), who were unable to view the contest after bombings destroyed television transmitters.[1]

Returning artistsEdit

Lead artistsEdit

Artist Country Previous Year(s)
Doris Dragović   Croatia 1986 (for   Yugoslavia)
Evelin Samuel (along with Camille)   Estonia 1997 (as a backing singer for Maarja-Liis Ilus)
Darja Švajger   Slovenia 1995

Backing performers[6]Edit

Artist Country Previous Year(s)
Chris and Moira   Malta 1994
Gabriel Forss   Sweden 1997 (as a member of Blond)
Stefán Hilmarsson   Iceland 1988 (as a member of Beathoven) and 1991 (with Eyjólfur Kristjánsson)
Kenny Lübcke   Denmark 1992 (with Lotte Nilsson)
Linda Williams   Belgium 1981 (for the   Netherlands).

ResultsEdit

Draw Country Artist Song Language[7][8] Place[9] Points
01   Lithuania Aistė "Strazdas" Samogitian 20 13
02   Belgium Vanessa Chinitor "Like the Wind" English 12 38
03   Spain Lydia "No quiero escuchar" Spanish 23 1
04   Croatia Doris Dragović "Marija Magdalena" Croatian 4 118
05   United Kingdom Precious "Say It Again" English 12 38
06   Slovenia Darja Švajger "For a Thousand Years" English 11 50
07   Turkey Tuğba Önal & Grup Mistik "Dön Artık" Turkish 16 21
08   Norway Stig Van Eijk "Living My Life Without You" English 14 35
09   Denmark Trine Jepsen & Michael Teschl "This Time I Mean It" English 8 71
10   France Nayah "Je veux donner ma voix" French 19 14
11   Netherlands Marlayne "One Good Reason" English 8 71
12   Poland Mietek Szcześniak "Przytul mnie mocno" Polish 18 17
13   Iceland Selma "All Out of Luck" English 2 146
14   Cyprus Marlain "Tha'nai Erotas" (Θα'ναι έρωτας) Greek 22 2
15   Sweden Charlotte Nilsson "Take Me to Your Heaven" English 1 163
16   Portugal Rui Bandeira "Como tudo começou" Portuguese 21 12
17   Ireland The Mullans "When You Need Me" English 17 18
18   Austria Bobbie Singer "Reflection" English 10 65
19   Israel Eden "Yom Huledet (Happy Birthday)" (יום הולדת) English, Hebrew 5 93
20   Malta Times Three "Believe 'n Peace" English 15 32
21   Germany Sürpriz "Reise nach Jerusalem – Kudüs'e seyahat" German, Turkish, English[a] 3 140
22   Bosnia and Herzegovina Dino & Béatrice "Putnici" Bosnian, French 7 86
23   Estonia Evelin Samuel & Camille "Diamond of Night" English 6 90

Voting structureEdit

Each country had a televote, where the top ten most voted-for songs were awarded the 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 points, with the exceptions of Turkey, Lithuania, Ireland and Bosnia and Herzegovina who used juries.[citation needed]

ScoreboardEdit

Voting results[10]
Voting procedure used:
  100% Televoting
  100% Jury vote
Total score
Lithuania
Belgium
Spain
Croatia
United Kingdom
Slovenia
Turkey
Norway
Denmark
France
Netherlands
Poland
Iceland
Cyprus
Sweden
Portugal
Ireland
Austria
Israel
Malta
Germany
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Estonia
Contestants
Lithuania 13 2 5 3 1 2
Belgium 38 4 2 10 2 10 5 5
Spain 1 1
Croatia 118 6 5 12 12 8 7 1 7 4 2 1 6 6 8 7 5 10 8 3
United Kingdom 38 5 4 5 2 4 1 4 4 8 1
Slovenia 50 10 2 2 12 1 6 12 5
Turkey 21 4 5 12
Norway 35 7 6 7 7 5 3
Denmark 71 5 5 5 1 12 8 8 3 7 5 2 4 6
France 14 2 2 8 2
Netherlands 71 4 12 3 8 3 5 7 6 4 2 1 4 6 2 4
Poland 17 7 4 6
Iceland 146 8 8 10 10 10 10 12 7 4 12 12 4 4 2 10 10 3 10
Cyprus 2 2
Sweden 163 3 7 6 12 7 6 12 10 3 8 6 10 6 10 5 6 8 12 2 12 12
Portugal 12 12
Ireland 18 12 4 1 1
Austria 65 6 7 4 6 3 2 3 8 1 7 5 5 8
Israel 93 3 8 8 1 3 2 2 10 4 10 1 10 3 8 1 6 7 2 4
Malta 32 6 6 3 1 7 1 7 1
Germany 140 10 7 3 1 6 12 3 5 8 12 12 5 2 12 10 12 3 10 7
Bosnia and Herzegovina 86 1 10 10 7 7 8 6 3 5 3 6 12 8
Estonia 90 1 4 1 3 8 5 4 4 5 8 2 10 7 8 3 1 7 6 3

12 pointsEdit

Below is a summary of all 12 point in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
5   Germany   Israel,   Netherlands,   Poland,   Portugal,   Turkey
  Sweden   Bosnia and Herzegovina,   Estonia,   Malta,   Norway,   United Kingdom
3   Iceland   Cyprus,   Denmark,   Sweden
2   Croatia   Slovenia,   Spain
  Slovenia   Croatia,   Ireland
1   Bosnia and Herzegovina   Austria
  Denmark   Iceland
  Ireland   Lithuania
  Netherlands   Belgium
  Portugal   France
  Turkey   Germany

Qualification for the 2000 contestEdit

In addition to Sweden, the host country of the 2000 contest, and the "Big Four", the 13 countries with the highest average scores between 1995 and 1999 were allowed to take part in the Eurovision Song Contest 2000 alongside new or returning countries.[11]

Table key

  Automatically qualified
  Qualified
Rank Country Average Yearly Scores
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999
1   United Kingdom 116.80 76 77 227 166 38
2   Israel 115.33 81 172 93
3   Sweden 90.40 100 100 36 53 163
4   Ireland 89.00 44 162 157 64 18
5   Croatia 84.60 91 98 24 131 79[b]
6   Malta 81.40 76 68 66 165 32
7   Netherlands 76.00 78 5 150 71
8   Estonia 75.50 94 82 36 90
9   Norway 75.20 148 114 0 79 35
10   Denmark 62.67 92 25 71
11   Germany 62.25 1 22 86 140
12   Iceland 61.50 31 51 18 146
13   Cyprus 57.60 79 72 98 37 2
14   Austria 53.00 67 68 12 65
15   Spain 50.80 119 17 96 21 1
16   Turkey 49.00 21 57 121 25 21
17   Belgium 47.50 8 22 122 38
18   Slovenia 45.40 84 16 60 17 50
19   France 44.80 94 18 95 3 14
20   Bosnia and Herzegovina 33.75 14 13 22 86
21   Portugal 29.00 5 92 0 36 12
22   Poland 27.20 15 31 54 19 17
23   Lithuania 13.00 13

International broadcasts and votingEdit

Voting and spokespersonsEdit

The spokespersons announced the score from their respective country's televote (or, in some cases, national jury) in running order.

  1.   LithuaniaAndrius Tapinas
  2.   Belgium – Sabine De Vos[13]
  3.   Spain – Hugo de Campos
  4.   Croatia – Marko Rašica[14]
  5.   United KingdomColin Berry
  6.   Slovenia – Mira Berginc
  7.   Turkey – Osman Erkan
  8.   Norway – Ragnhild Sælthun Fjørtoft
  9.   Denmark – Kirsten Siggaard (Danish representative in 1984, 1985 and 1988 as member of Hot Eyes)[15]
  10.   FranceMarie Myriam (Winner of the 1977 contest)[16]
  11.   NetherlandsEdsilia Rombley (Dutch representative in 1998 and 2007; host in 2021)
  12.   Poland – Jan Chojnacki
  13.   Iceland – Áslaug Dóra Eyjólfsdóttir
  14.   Cyprus – Marina Maleni[17]
  15.   SwedenPontus Gårdinger[18]
  16.   PortugalManuel Luís Goucha[19]
  17.   Ireland – Clare McNamara
  18.   Austria – Dodo Roščić
  19.   Israel – Yoav Ginai (Winner of the 1998 contest, as lyricist)[20]
  20.   Malta – Nirvana Azzopardi
  21.   GermanyRenan Demirkan
  22.   Bosnia and Herzegovina – Segmedina Srna
  23.   EstoniaMart Sander[21]

CommentatorsEdit

Most countries sent commentators to Jerusalem or commented from their own country, in order to add insight to the participants and, if necessary, the provision of voting information.

Participating countriesEdit

Non-participating countriesEdit

Radio commentatorsEdit

The participating countries that provided radio broadcasts for the event are listed below.

Notes and referencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Contains some words in Hebrew
  2. ^ Croatia's score from the 1999 contest was reduced by 33% for the purposes of determining average scores due to the use of synthesised pre-recorded vocals in that year's Croatian entry.[12]

ReferencesEdit

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  2. ^ a b c d e f g "History – Eurovision Song Contest 1999". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 2009-08-12.
  3. ^ "Various - Eurovision Song Contest Israel 1999". Discogs. Retrieved 21 May 2020.
  4. ^ http://www.eurosong.net/archive/esc1999.pdf
  5. ^ "GERMAN NATIONAL FINAL 1999". 50webs.com.
  6. ^ "1999". Diggiloo.net. Retrieved 7 December 2020.
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  10. ^ "Results of the Final of Jerusalem 1999". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 12 April 2021. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  11. ^ "Rules of the 45th Eurovision Song Contest, 2000" (PDF). European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  12. ^ "Jerusalem 1999 - Eurovision Song Contest". European Broadcasting Union. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
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  14. ^ "Pogledaj temu – SPOKESPERSONS". Forum.hrt.hr. 2008-02-29. Archived from the original on 2012-03-14. Retrieved 2012-08-09.
  15. ^ a b "Forside". esconnet.dk. Archived from the original on 2012-03-24. Retrieved 2012-08-09.
  16. ^ "Concours Eurovision de la Chanson • Consulter le sujet – Porte-paroles des jurys des pays francophones". Eurovision.vosforums.com. Retrieved 2012-08-09.
  17. ^ a b Savvidis, Christos (OGAE Cyprus)
  18. ^ a b "Infosajten.com". Infosajten.com. Archived from the original on July 18, 2012. Retrieved 2012-08-09.
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  21. ^ [1] Archived August 22, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  22. ^ [2] Archived February 20, 2005, at the Wayback Machine
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  32. ^ "FORO FESTIVAL DE EUROVISIÓN • Ver Tema – Uribarri comentarista Eurovision 2010". Eurosongcontest.phpbb3.es. Archived from the original on 2012-03-17. Retrieved 2012-08-09.
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  36. ^ "Diva.lv - Eirovīzijas Dziesmu konkursa Nacionālā atlase". www.diva.lv. Retrieved 26 May 2020.
  37. ^ "NRK P1 1999.05.29 : programrapport". urn.nb.no 14 (29. mai 1999). Retrieved 2017-08-21.
  38. ^ "Swedes stay at home with Eurovision fever". The Local. 2009-05-16. Archived from the original on 2013-05-15. Retrieved 2012-09-29.
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External linksEdit