Eurovision Song Contest 1995

The Eurovision Song Contest 1995 was the 40th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest, held on 13 May 1995 at the Point Theatre in Dublin, Ireland. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ) and presented by Irish journalist and television presenter Mary Kennedy, the contest was held in Ireland following the country's victory at the 1994 contest with the song "Rock 'n' Roll Kids" by Paul Harrington and Charlie McGettigan. It was the third consecutive contest to be held in Ireland, and the second consecutive edition to be held in the Point Theatre in Dublin.

Eurovision Song Contest 1995
ESC 1995 logo.svg
Dates
Final13 May 1995
Host
VenuePoint Theatre,
Dublin, Ireland
Presenter(s)Mary Kennedy
Musical directorNoel Kelehan
Directed byJohn Comiskey
Executive supervisorChristian Clausen
Executive producerJohn McHugh
Host broadcasterRadio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ)
Opening actVideo montage of clips from past contests
Interval actLumen
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/dublin-1995 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries23
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries
Non-returning countries
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Italy in the Eurovision Song ContestNetherlands in the Eurovision Song ContestSwitzerland in the Eurovision Song ContestGermany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestSpain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Finland in the Eurovision Song ContestNorway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song ContestMorocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Estonia in the Eurovision Song ContestSlovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestHungary in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Romania in the Eurovision Song ContestLithuania in the Eurovision Song ContestPoland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1995
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points in finalNone
Winning song
1994 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1996

Twenty-three countries participated in the contest; Estonia, Finland, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Romania, Slovakia and Switzerland were relegated as the lowest-scoring countries in the previous edition, and were replaced by Belgium, Denmark, Israel, Slovenia and Turkey, returning after being relegated following the 1993 edition.

The winner was Norway with the song "Nocturne", composed by Rolf Løvland, written by Petter Skavlan and performed by Secret Garden. Spain, Sweden, France and Denmark rounded out the top five, with Spain achieving their best result since 1979. Croatia and Slovenia also achieved their best results so far, placing sixth and seventh respectively, while Germany finished in last place for the fourth time.

LocationEdit

 
Point Theatre, Dublin – host venue of the 1995 contest (pictured following redevelopment)

The 1995 contest took place in Dublin, Ireland, following the country's victory at the 1994 edition with the song "Rock 'n' Roll Kids", performed by Paul Harrington and Charlie McGettigan. It was the sixth time that Ireland had hosted the contest, having previously staged the event in 1971, 1981, 1988, 1993 and 1994, with all previous events held in Dublin except the 1993 contest which was held in Millstreet.[1] Ireland thus became the first, and as of 2022 only country to have hosted three successive contests.[2][3]

The selected venue was the Point Theatre, a concert and events venue located amongst the Dublin Docklands which had originally been built as a train depot to serve the nearby port. Opened as a music venue in 1988, it was closed for redevelopment and expansion in 2008 and is now known as the 3Arena.[4] Having previously hosted the 1994 contest, Dublin became the first city to host two consecutive Eurovision Song Contests, with the Point Theatre also serving as the host venue for the second year in a row.[2][5]

Alternative venues in Galway and Limerick were considered by RTÉ, however Dublin was chosen to stage the contest again as it was judged to have been the more cost-effective location.[6] A proposal by the British broadcaster BBC to host the contest, either by themselves or as a joint production hosted in Belfast, the capital city of Northern Ireland, were also rejected by RTÉ as the Irish broadcaster chose to produce the contest on its own.[5][6] RTÉ however did request a rule change, which was accepted by the EBU, which would have relieved them of the responsibility of producing the contest again should Ireland produce a fourth consecutive winner.[5]

Production and formatEdit

The Eurovision Song Contest 1995 was produced by the Irish public broadcaster Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ). John McHugh served as executive producer, John Comiskey served as director, Alan Farquharson served as designers, and Noel Kelehan served as musical director, leading the RTÉ Concert Orchestra.[2][7] The show was presented by journalist and television presenter Mary Kennedy.[2] Kennedy had previously served as the stand-by presenter at the 1981 contest, understudying for Doireann Ní Bhriain.[6] RTÉ was reported to have spent IR£2.3 million on staging the contest, with the Northern Ireland Tourist Board and the National Lottery among the contest's sponsors. Through the partnership with the National Lottery, around 1,000 places in the audience were filled by members of the public who had won tickets by playing scratchcards.[6][5]

Each participating broadcaster submitted one song, which was required to be no longer than three minutes in duration and performed in the language, or one of the languages, of the country which it represented.[8][9] A maximum of six performers were allowed on stage during each country's performance, and all participants were required to have reached the age of 16 in the year of the contest.[8][10] Each entry could utilise all or part of the live orchestra and could use instrumental-only backing tracks, however any backing tracks used could only include the sound of instruments featured on stage being mimed by the performers.[10][11]

The results of the 1995 contest were determined through the same scoring system as had first been introduced in 1975: each country awarded twelve points to its favourite entry, followed by ten points to its second favourite, and then awarded points in decreasing value from eight to one for the remaining songs which featured in the country's top ten, with countries unable to vote for their own entry.[12] The points awarded by each country were determined by an assembled jury of sixteen individuals, which was required to be split evenly between members of the public and music professionals, between men and women, and between those over and under 30 years of age. Each jury member voted in secret and awarded between one and ten votes to each participating song, excluding that from their own country and with no abstentions permitted. The votes of each member were collected following the country's performance and then tallied by the non-voting jury chairperson to determine the points to be awarded. In any cases where two or more songs in the top ten received the same number of votes, a show of hands by all jury members was used to determine the final placing.[13][14]

Rehearsals in the contest venue for the competing acts began on 8 May 1995. Each country had two technical rehearsals in the week approaching the contest, with countries rehearsing in the order in which they would perform. The first rehearsals took place on 8 and 9 May, with each country allowed 40 minutes total on stage, with an opportunity to review recordings with producers and to consult on suggested changes afterwards, followed by a 20 minute press conference. Each country's second rehearsals took place on 10 and 11 May, with 30 minutes total on stage. Three dress rehearsals were held with all artists, two held in the afternoon and evening of 12 May and one final rehearsals in the afternoon of 13 May. An audience was present for the second dress rehearsal in the evening of 12 May, with this rehearsal also recorded for use as a production stand-by in case of problems during the live contest.[6] The competing delegations were additionally invited to a welcome reception during the week in the build-up to the event, organised by Irish Ferries and hosted at the Royal Hospital Kilmainham on the evening of 8 May.[6][15]

To celebrate the contest's fortieth anniversary, the show opened with a four-minute sequence, directed by Pat Cowap, containing clips and performances from previous contests; Cowap had previously served as director of the 1994 contest.[6] The contest's interval act, entitled "Lumen", was a original piece composed by Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin and which combined Gregorian chant and sean-nós singing with contemporary music. Among the performers of "Lumen" were Súilleabháin on piano, Scottish percussionist Evelyn Glennie, Irish singers Brian Kennedy and Nóirín Ní Riain, members of the Irish folk band Clannad, the Benedictine monks of Glenstal Abbey, and the RTÉ Concert Orchestra conducted by Proinnsías Ó Duinn.[16][17][18][19] Kennedy would go on to perform at Eurovision again as a contestant, representing Ireland in the 2006 contest.[20][21] The trophy awarded to the winners was designed by Kevin O'Dwyer, and was presented by the previous year's winning artists Paul Harrington and Charlie McGettigan.[22][23]

Participating countriesEdit

Twenty-three countries were permitted to participate in the contest, which was to comprise the sixteen highest-scoring countries in the 1994 contest and returning countries that had been relegated and prevented from participating in the previous year's event. The total line-up was reduced from the twenty-five countries which participated in the 1994 contest to ensure that the event would not last longer than three hours.[2][6] Of the seven countries which did not participate in 1994, Belgium, Denmark, Israel, Slovenia and Turkey returned to the contest, while Italy and Luxembourg declined the invitation, which resulted in Austria and Spain, which were originally relegated, being allowed back into the line-up. Estonia, Finland, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Romania, Slovakia and Switzerland, as the lowest-scoring countries from the previous year's event, were thus ultimately relegated and were required to miss this event.[2][5][6] Switzerland did not participate in the contest for the first time, leaving Germany as the sole country to have participated in every edition of the contest to that point.[5][6]

Following the confirmation of the twenty-three competing countries, the draw to determine the running order was held on 9 December 1994.[6]

ConductorsEdit

A separate musical director could be nominated by each country to lead the orchestra during their performance, with the host musical director, Noel Kelehan, also available to conduct for those countries which did not nominate their own conductor.[24] The conductors listed below led the orchestra during the performance for the indicated countries.[25][26]

Participants and resultsEdit

 
Rolf Løvland and Fionnuala Sherry, the winning artists of the 1995 Eurovision Song Contest as Secret Garden

The contest took place on 13 May 1995 at 20:00 (IST) and lasted 2 hours and 51 minutes.[2][25] The table below outlines the participating countries, the order in which they performed, the competing artists and songs, and the results of the voting.

The contest featured two representatives who had previously performed in the contest. Turkey's Arzu Ece had previously represented her country at the 1989 contest as a member of the group Pan, and Cyprus's Alexandros Panayi had provided backing vocals for two previous Cypriot entries, for Fani Polymeri and Yiannis Savvidakis in 1989 and Elena Patroklou in 1991.[25][27]

The winner was Norway represented by the song "Nocturne", composed by Rolf Løvland, written by Petter Skavlan and performed by Secret Garden.[28] This was Norway's second contest win, following the victory by Bobbysocks! ten years previously at the 1985 contest with "La det swinge", which was also written by Rolf Løvland;[29][30] Løvland thus became one of four individuals to have won the contest more than once as an artist or songwriter up to that point in time, alongside Willy van Hemert, Yves Dessca and Johnny Logan.[31] The group Secret Garden consisted principally of Norwegian composer and pianist Løvland and Irish violinist Fionnuala Sherry and was formed after the pair had met at the 1994 contest, where Sherry was a member of the RTÉ Concert Orchestra and Løvland was in attendance as composer of that year's Norwegian entry.[32] For their performance during the contest they were joined by instrumentalists Hans Fredrik Jacobsen and Åsa Jinder and singer Gunnhild Tvinnereim.[33] "Nocturne" was a largely instrumental piece featuring only 24 words in total, with brief vocals only at the start and end of the song performed by Tvinnereim.[2][25][5]

Spain achieved its best result since 1979 by finishing as the contest's runner-up, Croatia and Slovenia gained their highest placements to date by finishing in sixth and seventh place respectively, while conversely Germany finished in last place for the fourth time.[13][34][35][36][37] The 1995 contest was the last edition of the contest where the top three songs were all performed in a language other than English until the 2021 event.[38]

Participants and results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1995[25][39][40]
R/O Country Artist Song Language Points Place
1   Poland Justyna "Sama" Polish 15 18
2   Ireland Eddie Friel "Dreamin'" English 44 14
3   Germany Stone and Stone "Verliebt in Dich" German 1 23
4   Bosnia and Herzegovina Davor Popović "Dvadeset prvi vijek" Bosnian 14 19
5   Norway Secret Garden "Nocturne" Norwegian 148 1
6   Russia Philipp Kirkorov "Kolybelnaya dlya vulkana" (Колыбельная для вулкана) Russian 17 17
7   Iceland Bo Halldórsson "Núna" Icelandic 31 15
8   Austria Stella Jones "Die Welt dreht sich verkehrt" German 67 13
9   Spain Anabel Conde "Vuelve conmigo" Spanish 119 2
10   Turkey Arzu Ece "Sev!" Turkish 21 16
11   Croatia Magazin and Lidija "Nostalgija" Croatian 91 6
12   France Nathalie Santamaria "Il me donne rendez-vous" French 94 4
13   Hungary Csaba Szigeti "Új név egy régi ház falán" Hungarian 3 22
14   Belgium Frédéric Etherlinck "La voix est libre" French 8 20
15   United Kingdom Love City Groove "Love City Groove" English 76 10
16   Portugal Tó Cruz "Baunilha e chocolate" Portuguese 5 21
17   Cyprus Alexandros Panayi "Sti fotia" (Στη φωτιά) Greek 79 9
18   Sweden Jan Johansen "Se på mej" Swedish 100 3
19   Denmark Aud Wilken "Fra Mols til Skagen" Danish 92 5
20   Slovenia Darja Švajger "Prisluhni mi" Slovene 84 7
21   Israel Liora "Amen" (אמן) Hebrew 81 8
22   Malta Mike Spiteri "Keep Me in Mind" English 76 10
23   Greece Elina Konstantopoulou "Pia prosefhi" (Ποιά προσευχή) Greek[a] 68 12

Detailed voting resultsEdit

Jury voting was used to determine the points awarded by all countries.[13] The announcement of the results from each country was conducted in the order in which they performed, with the spokespersons announcing their country's points in English or French in ascending order.[41] The detailed breakdown of the points awarded by each country is listed in the tables below.

Detailed voting results of the Eurovision Song Contest 1995[13][42][43]
Total score
Poland
Ireland
Germany
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Norway
Russia
Iceland
Austria
Spain
Turkey
Croatia
France
Hungary
Belgium
United Kingdom
Portugal
Cyprus
Sweden
Denmark
Slovenia
Israel
Malta
Greece
Contestants
Poland 15 4 6 1 1 3
Ireland 44 1 5 1 5 3 3 5 1 10 1 5 4
Germany 1 1
Bosnia and Herzegovina 14 3 8 3
Norway 148 12 10 4 1 12 12 4 12 10 6 5 4 12 7 2 7 10 6 12
Russia 17 10 6 1
Iceland 31 6 2 3 4 2 6 8
Austria 67 2 3 6 4 8 4 10 5 2 4 10 2 7
Spain 119 8 2 6 8 5 8 10 7 2 12 8 7 10 12 8 6
Turkey 21 2 5 1 2 3 1 7
Croatia 91 3 10 7 10 12 7 4 5 12 4 12 5
France 94 7 5 8 6 8 10 2 3 10 6 1 2 3 6 8 7 2
Hungary 3 2 1
Belgium 8 1 7
United Kingdom 76 5 1 4 1 12 12 7 7 10 5 7 5
Portugal 5 4 1
Cyprus 79 1 3 5 4 2 5 1 12 8 3 8 5 4 6 4 8
Sweden 100 10 12 12 2 8 6 4 8 1 3 6 8 4 12 1 3
Denmark 92 3 7 7 3 12 10 7 7 6 3 3 6 12 6
Slovenia 84 4 8 5 6 7 1 3 2 8 10 5 3 7 3 2 10
Israel 81 10 7 8 6 4 5 4 12 8 2 10 5
Malta 76 4 2 12 2 10 10 12 6 7 6 1 4
Greece 68 6 5 8 7 5 2 3 12 2 8 10

12 pointsEdit

The below table summarises how the maximum 12 points were awarded from one country to another. The winning country is shown in bold.

Distribution of 12 points awarded at the Eurovision Song Contest 1995[42][43]
N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
6   Norway   Greece,   Iceland,   Poland,   Portugal,   Russia,   Turkey
3   Croatia   Malta,   Slovenia,   Spain
  Sweden   Denmark,   Germany,   Ireland
2   Denmark   Norway,   Sweden
  Malta   Bosnia and Herzegovina,   Croatia
  Spain   Belgium,   Israel
  United Kingdom   Austria,   France
1   Cyprus   Hungary
  Greece   Cyprus
  Israel   United Kingdom

SpokespersonsEdit

Each country nominated a spokesperson who was responsible for announcing, in English or French, the votes for their respective country.[8] As had been the case in the 1994 contest, the spokespersons were connected via satellite and appeared in vision during the broadcast.[44] Spokespersons at the 1995 contest are listed below.[41]

  1.   Poland – Jan Chojnacki
  2.   Ireland – Eileen Dunne[45]
  3.   Germany – Carmen Nebel
  4.   Bosnia and Herzegovina – Diana Grković-Foretić
  5.   Norway – Sverre Christophersen [no]
  6.   Russia – Marina Danielian
  7.   Iceland – Áslaug Dóra Eyjólfsdóttir
  8.   Austria – Tilia Herold [de]
  9.   Spain – Belén Fernández de Henestrosa
  10.   Turkey – Ömer Önder
  11.   Croatia – Daniela Trbović [hr]
  12.   France – Thierry Beccaro
  13.   Hungary – Katalin Bogyay
  14.   Belgium – Marie-Françoise Renson
  15.   United Kingdom – Colin Berry[13]
  16.   Portugal – Serenella Andrade
  17.   Cyprus – Andreas Iakovidis
  18.   Sweden – Björn Hedman[46]
  19.   Denmark – Bent Henius [dk][47]
  20.   Slovenia – Miša Molk
  21.   Israel – Daniel Pe'er
  22.   Malta – Stephanie Farrugia
  23.   Greece – Fotini Giannoulatou

BroadcastsEdit

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its networks. Non-participating EBU member broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants". Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers.[10] Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the tables below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
  Austria ORF ORF 1 Ernst Grissemann [de] [48][49][50][51]
FM4 Stermann & Grissemann
  Belgium RTBF RTBF1 Jean-Pierre Hautier [52][53][54]
BRTN BRTN TV1 André Vermeulen [55][56]
  Bosnia and Herzegovina RTVBiH Unknown Unknown [57]
  Croatia HRT HRT 1 Aleksandar Kostadinov [58][59]
  Cyprus CyBC Unknown Evi Papamichail [60][61]
  Denmark DR DR TV Jørgen de Mylius [62][63]
DR P3
  France France Télévision France 2 Olivier Minne [64][65][66]
  Germany ARD Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen Horst Senker [49][67][68]
  Greece ERT Unknown Dafni Bokota [69][70]
  Hungary MTV MTV2 István Vágó [71][72]
  Iceland RÚV Sjónvarpið Jakob Frímann Magnússon [73][74]
  Ireland RTÉ Unknown Pat Kenny [33][75][76]
Unknown Larry Gogan
  Israel IBA Unknown Unknown [77]
  Malta PBS TVM Unknown [78][79]
  Norway NRK NRK Annette Groth [28][80][81]
NRK P1 Stein Dag Jensen [no]
  Poland TVP TVP1 Artur Orzech [82][83][84]
  Portugal RTP RTP Canal 1 Unknown [65][85]
  Russia ORT[b] Unknown [84][86][87]
  Slovenia RTV SLO SLO 1 [sl] Unknown [88][89]
  Spain TVE La Primera José Luis Uribarri [65][90][91]
  Sweden SVT TV2 Pernilla Månsson [46][80][92]
SR SR P3 and SR P4 Claes-Johan Larsson and Lisa Syrén [46]
  Turkey TRT Unknown Unknown [93]
  United Kingdom BBC BBC1 Terry Wogan [25][94][95][96]
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
  Australia SBS SBS TV[c] Unknown [97]
  Estonia ETV Unknown [98]
  Finland YLE YLE TV1 Erkki Pohjanheimo and Olli Ahvenlahti [98][99][100]
YLE Radio Suomi Iris Mattila and Ossi Runne
  Netherlands NOS Nederland 3 Paul de Leeuw [55]
  Romania TVR TVR 1 Unknown [101]
  Switzerland SRG SSR Schweiz 4 [de] Heinz Margot [49][65]
Suisse 4 [fr] Jean-Marc Richard

Notes and referencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Contains one phrase in Ancient Greek
  2. ^ Delayed broadcast without voting sequence on 15 May 1995 at 00:30 MSD (14 May; 20:30 UTC)[5][84][86]
  3. ^ Delayed broadcast on 14 May 1995 at 20:30 AEST (10:30 UTC)[97]

ReferencesEdit

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