Eurovision Song Contest 1990

The Eurovision Song Contest 1990 was the 35th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It was held in Zagreb, SR Croatia, Yugoslavia,[a] following the country's victory at the 1989 contest with the song "Rock Me" by Riva. It was the only time Yugoslavia hosted the contest. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcasters Yugoslav Radio Television (JRT) and Radiotelevision Zagreb (RTZ), the contest was held at Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall on 5 May 1990 and was hosted by Croatian television presenters Helga Vlahović and Oliver Mlakar.[1] It was the first Eurovision Song Contest held in the Balkans as well as the first contest held in a communist or socialist state.

Eurovision Song Contest 1990
ESC 1990 logo.png
Dates
Final5 May 1990
Host
VenueVatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall
Zagreb, SR Croatia, SFR Yugoslavia
Presenter(s)Helga Vlahović
Oliver Mlakar
Musical directorIgor Kuljerić
Stanko Selak (assistant)
Directed byNenad Puhovski
Executive supervisorFrank Naef
Executive producerGoran Radman
Host broadcasterYugoslav Radio Television (JRT)
Radiotelevision Zagreb (RTZ)
Opening actA short film "Zagreb: City of Music"
Interval actYugoslav Changes – a film about tourism in the country.
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/zagreb-1990 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries22
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countriesNone
Non-returning countriesNone
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Malta in the Eurovision Song ContestAustria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1990A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1990
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points in finalNone
Winning song Italy
"Insieme: 1992"
1989 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1991

Twenty-two countries took part in the contest, the same countries that had participated the previous year.

The winner was Italy with the song "Insieme: 1992" by Toto Cutugno. Cutugno was aged 46 years and 302 days at the time of his victory, making him the oldest winner of the contest to date, the first to be aged in their forties since 1958. He held the record until 2000.[2] The 1990 contest also notably remains the last time that the five countries that would later become known as the "Big Five" – Italy, France, Spain, the United Kingdom and Germany – all placed in the top 10 (Italy won, France tied for second, Spain came fifth, the UK came sixth and Germany came ninth).

LocationEdit

 
Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall, Zagreb – host venue of the 1990 contest.

Zagreb, the capital of Croatia, was the second largest city in Yugoslavia. Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall was chosen to host the contest. The concert hall and convention center is named after Vatroslav Lisinski, a 19th-century Croatian composer.[3] The building has a big hall with 1,841 seats and a small hall with 305 seats.[3]

In order to host the 1990 contest, the venue underwent its first major renovation in 1989.[4] In 1992, the hall's copper roof cover was completely replaced.[4] Further reconstruction and redecoration work was done in 1999 and 2009.[5][6]

FormatEdit

The Eurovision Song Contest 1990 was the first to implement an age rule. The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) were forced to bring in a restriction rule after criticism arose over the ages of two performers at 1989 contest, being just 11 and 12 years old. From 1990, no artist under the age of 16 on the day of the contest could perform on stage. This rule meant that the record for the youngest ever winner at Eurovision could never be broken, as Sandra Kim, who won for Belgium at the 1986 competition, was just 13 years old.

The lyrics of several entries celebrated the revolution and democratisation that had occurred in central and eastern Europe in the preceding months, focusing especially on the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989, such as in the Norwegian and Austrian entries. However, the winning song was an even more sweeping evocation of European unity, in anticipation of the completion of the European single market, due at the end of 1992.

From a musical perspective both Spain's "Bandido" and France's "White and Black Blues" can be said to be the first entries to signal a new trend at Eurovision, with both songs fusing contemporary dance music with ethnic influences, from flamenco and calypso respectively.

The 1990 contest was the first year to feature an official mascot, Eurocat, created by Joško Marušić. This mischievous purple cat popped up during the 'postcards' of each of the 22 entries, which also included travelogues of the country about to perform, in conjunction with the European Year of Tourism 1990.

Participating countriesEdit

ConductorsEdit

Each performance had a conductor who directed the orchestra.[7][8]

Returning artistsEdit

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Ketil Stokkan   Norway 1986
Pepel in kri (backing vocalists)   Italy 1975 (for   Yugoslavia)

Participants and resultsEdit

R/O Country Artist Song Language[9][10] Points Place[11]
1   Spain Azúcar Moreno "Bandido" Spanish 96 5
2   Greece Christos Callow and Wave "Horis skopo" (Χωρίς σκοπό) Greek 11 19
3   Belgium Philippe Lafontaine "Macédomienne" French 46 12
4   Turkey Kayahan "Gözlerinin Hapsindeyim" Turkish 21 17
5   Netherlands Maywood "Ik wil alles met je delen" Dutch 25 15
6   Luxembourg Céline Carzo "Quand je te rêve" French 38 13
7   United Kingdom Emma "Give a Little Love Back to the World" English 87 6
8   Iceland Stjórnin "Eitt lag enn" Icelandic 124 4
9   Norway Ketil Stokkan "Brandenburger Tor" Norwegian 8 21
10   Israel Rita "Shara Barkhovot" (שרה ברחובות) Hebrew 16 18
11   Denmark Lonnie Devantier "Hallo Hallo" Danish 64 8
12    Switzerland Egon Egemann "Musik klingt in die Welt hinaus" German 51 11
13   Germany Chris Kempers and Daniel Kovac "Frei zu leben" German 60 9
14   France Joëlle Ursull "White and Black Blues" French 132 2
15   Yugoslavia Tajči "Hajde da ludujemo" (Хајде да лудујемо) Serbo-Croatian 81 7
16   Portugal Nucha "Há sempre alguém" Portuguese 9 20
17   Ireland Liam Reilly "Somewhere in Europe" English 132 2
18   Sweden Edin-Ådahl "Som en vind" Swedish 24 16
19   Italy Toto Cutugno "Insieme: 1992" Italian[b] 149 1
20   Austria Simone "Keine Mauern mehr" German[c] 58 10
21   Cyprus Haris Anastasiou "Milas poli" (Μιλάς πολύ) Greek 36 14
22   Finland Beat "Fri?" Swedish 8 21

Detailed voting resultsEdit

Detailed voting results[12][13]
Total score
Spain
Greece
Belgium
Turkey
Netherlands
Luxembourg
United Kingdom
Iceland
Norway
Israel
Denmark
Switzerland
Germany
France
Yugoslavia
Portugal
Ireland
Sweden
Italy
Austria
Cyprus
Finland
Contestants
Spain 96 8 1 10 2 1 4 5 6 12 5 3 5 8 8 8 10
Greece 11 5 6
Belgium 46 7 4 1 4 8 8 2 1 7 4
Turkey 21 3 2 4 5 7
Netherlands 25 1 3 1 4 2 3 6 1 2 2
Luxembourg 38 4 3 3 12 2 3 1 5 5
United Kingdom 87 7 5 12 3 10 3 10 1 10 10 6 6 1 3
Iceland 124 4 3 10 1 8 12 10 8 10 7 4 12 7 8 3 10 7
Norway 8 4 1 3
Israel 16 4 2 4 1 5
Denmark 64 6 3 2 7 7 7 1 7 4 3 7 6 4
Switzerland 51 1 12 6 2 12 1 5 8 1 3
Germany 60 8 6 12 7 1 4 10 4 5 3
France 132 5 4 4 12 12 12 6 5 12 10 12 4 8 5 2 7 12
Yugoslavia 81 3 12 5 10 3 12 7 2 5 1 10 10 1
Portugal 9 7 2
Ireland 132 10 7 7 5 10 6 10 8 8 8 5 7 7 6 12 12 4
Sweden 24 2 2 6 6 6 2
Italy 149 12 10 8 8 8 10 3 1 6 8 6 4 6 10 12 10 7 12 8
Austria 58 2 7 1 5 8 6 3 8 2 2 12 2
Cyprus 36 6 5 2 5 2 6 4 6
Finland 8 5 3

12 pointsEdit

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
6   France   Finland,   Iceland,   Netherlands,   Norway,    Switzerland,   Yugoslavia
3   Italy   Cyprus,   Ireland,   Spain
2   Iceland   Portugal,   United Kingdom
  Ireland   Austria,   Sweden
   Switzerland   Denmark,   Greece
  Yugoslavia   Israel,   Turkey
1   Austria   Italy
  Germany   Luxembourg
  Luxembourg   France
  Spain   Germany
  United Kingdom   Belgium

SpokespersonsEdit

Each country announced their votes in the order of performance. The following is a list of spokespersons who announced the votes for their respective country.

BroadcastsEdit

National broadcasters were able to send a commentary team to the contest, in order to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language. In addition to the participating countries, host Helga Vlahović mentioned several countries as among the non-participants broadcasting the contest (Bulgaria, Canada, China, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Japan, Poland, Romania, South Korea and the Soviet Union were mentioned by Vlahović); however, no information is known about which broadcasters showed the contest and who, if anyone, provided commentary for each.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
  Austria FS1 Barbara Stöckl
Hitradio Ö3 Walter Richard Langer [de]
  Belgium RTBF1 French: Claude Delacroix [14]
BRT TV2 Dutch: Luc Appermont [15]
RTBF La Première French: Stéphane Dupont and Patrick Duhamel [fr]
BRT Radio 2 Dutch: Julien Put [nl]
  Cyprus RIK Neophytos Taliotis
RIK Deftero Pavlos Pavlou
  Denmark DR TV Jørgen de Mylius
DR P3 Karlo Staunskær [dk] and Kurt Helge Andersen
  Finland YLE TV1 Erkki Pohjanheimo and Ossi Runne
YLE 2-verkko Jake Nyman [fi] and Kati Bergman
  France Antenne 2 Richard Adaridi
France Inter Patrick Sabatier
  Germany Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen Fritz Egner
Deutschlandfunk/NDR Radio 2 Peter Urban
  Greece ET1 Dafni Bokota
ERA 1 Dimitris Konstantaras [el]
  Iceland Sjónvarpið Arthúr Björgvin Bollason [16]
  Ireland RTÉ 1 Jimmy Greeley and Clíona Ní Bhuachalla
RTÉ Radio 1 Larry Gogan
  Israel Israeli Television No commentator
Reshet Gimel Yigal Ravid
  Italy Rai Due[d] Nicoletta Orsomando
Rai Radio 2 Antonio De Robertis
  Luxembourg RTL Télévision Valérie Sarn [fr]
RTL André Torrent [fr]
  Netherlands Nederland 3 Willem van Beusekom [17]
Radio 2 Daniël Dekker [17]
  Norway NRK Leif Erik Forberg
NRK P2 Erik Heyerdahl [no]
  Portugal RTP Canal 1 Ana do Carmo
  Spain TVE 2 Luis Cobos
  Sweden TV2 Janne Jingryd [sv]
SR P3 Kersti Adams-Ray [sv]
   Switzerland SRG Sportkette [de] German: Bernard Thurnheer [de] [18]
SSR Chaîne sportive French: Thierry Masselot [18]
TSI Canale sportivo Italian: Emanuela Gaggini [18]
  Turkey TV1 Başak Doğru
TRT Radyo 3 Fatih Orbay
  United Kingdom BBC1 Terry Wogan, Emma (during the interval) [19][8]
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce [8]
  Yugoslavia TVB 1, TVZ 1 Serbo-Croatian: Branko Uvodić [hr]
TVL 1 Slovene: Saša Gerdej [sl]
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
  Australia SBS TV Unknown

IncidentsEdit

Presenter resignationsEdit

There was a slightly uncomfortable beginning to the rehearsal week when, offended by press comments concerning their ages (Vlahović being 45 at the time and Mlakar being 54), the two presenters quit the show. They were briefly replaced by Rene Medvešek and Dubravka Marković, who were much younger, but the misunderstandings were eventually allayed and Vlahović and Mlakar returned to the contest.

Technical issuesEdit

A notorious mishap occurred at the start of the first song, when a noticeably long delay caused by problems with the backing track (the sound engineer having forgotten to switch on the sound on the headphones of Spain's conductor Eduardo Leiva, who had to count in the orchestra playing the strings and brass along to the backing track) was followed by the Spanish singers Azúcar Moreno missing their cue. They walked off the stage in barely concealed annoyance and the audience was left in confusion for a moment, but the song was then restarted without any further problems.

Notes and referencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Located in present-day Croatia.
  2. ^ Repeats two words in English.
  3. ^ Contains some phrases in English, French and Serbo-Croatian.
  4. ^ The contest was broadcast on delay by 2 hours 20 minutes

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1990". EBU. Archived from the original on 2008-06-13. Retrieved 2008-09-19.
  2. ^ O'Connor, John Kennedy. The Eurovision Song Contest - The Official Celebration. Carlton Books, 2015. ISBN 978-1-78097-638-9. Pages 32-33
  3. ^ a b "Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall Celebrates 35 Years". Zagreb Tourist Board. Retrieved 2008-03-05.
  4. ^ a b "Concert Hall 'Vatroslav Lisinski' Zagreb". Investinženjering. Archived from the original on 2007-10-29. Retrieved 2008-03-09.
  5. ^ "Concert and Congress Hall Vatroslav Lisinski". Zagreb Convention Bureau. Retrieved 2008-03-09.
  6. ^ "Lisinski AZtheBest otvara se 16. listopada". Radio101.hr (in Croatian). Radio 101. October 14, 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-20.
  7. ^ "And the conductor is..." Retrieved 10 September 2020.
  8. ^ a b c d Roxburgh, Gordon (2020). Songs For Europe - The United Kingdom at the Eurovision Song Contest. Volume Four: The 1990s. UK: Telos Publishing. pp. 34–46. ISBN 978-1-84583-163-9.
  9. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1990". The Diggiloo Thrush. Retrieved 5 March 2012.
  10. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1990". 4Lyrics.eu. Retrieved 16 September 2020.
  11. ^ "Final of Zagreb 1990". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 17 April 2021. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  12. ^ "Results of the Final of Zagreb 1990". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 17 April 2021. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  13. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1990 – Scoreboard". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 23 October 2021.
  14. ^ "Victoire De La "Canzonetta": C'Est L'Histoire Du P'Tit Tot". Archives.lesoir.be. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  15. ^ Adriaens, Manu & Loeckx-Van Cauwenberge, Joken. Blijven kiken!. Lannoo, Belgium. 2003 ISBN 90-209-5274-9
  16. ^ "Dagblaðið Vísir - DV, 03.05.1990". Timarit.is. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  17. ^ a b "Welkom op de site van Eurovision Artists". Eurovisionartists.nl. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  18. ^ a b c "Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 5 May 1990".
  19. ^ Eurovision Song Contest 1990 BBC Archives

External linksEdit