Eurovision Song Contest 1986

The Eurovision Song Contest 1986 was the 31st edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It was held in Bergen, Norway, following the country's victory at the 1985 contest with the song "La det swinge" by Bobbysocks! Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Norsk rikskringkasting (NRK), the contest was held at Grieghallen on 3 May 1986 and was hosted by previous Norwegian contestant Åse Kleveland.

Eurovision Song Contest 1986
ESC 1986 logo.png
Dates
Final3 May 1986
Host
VenueGrieghallen
Bergen, Norway
Presenter(s)Åse Kleveland
Musical directorEgil Monn-Iversen
Directed byJohn Andreassen
Executive supervisorFrank Naef
Executive producerHarald Tusberg
Host broadcasterNorsk rikskringkasting (NRK)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/bergen-1986 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries20
Debuting countries Iceland
Returning countries
Non-returning countries
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Italy in the Eurovision Song ContestNetherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Greece in the Eurovision Song ContestMalta in the Eurovision Song ContestAustria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1986A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1986
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul pointsNone
Winning song Belgium
"J'aime la vie"
1985 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1987

Twenty countries took part in this years contest with Greece and Italy deciding not to participate and Yugoslavia and Netherlands returning. Iceland also competed for the first time this year.

The winner was Belgium with the song "J'aime la vie" by Sandra Kim. Belgium was the last of the original 7 countries that had competed in the very first contest to win. Aged 13, Kim was the youngest ever Eurovision winner. Current rules require Eurovision Song Contest participants to be at least 16, so unless the rule is changed, Kim's record will never be broken. In the lyrics of her song, Kim claimed to be 15 years of age, but after the contest, it was revealed that she was actually 13. Switzerland, who finished second, appealed for her to be disqualified, but was not successful.

The 1986 contest was a first for Eurovision in that royalty were among the guests—Crown Prince Harald, Crown Princess Sonja, Princess Märtha Louise and Prince Haakon Magnus were all in attendance.

BackgroundEdit

Locations of the candidate cities. The chosen host city is marked in blue.
 
Grieghallen, Bergen – host venue of the 1986 contest.

By 1985, Norway had received the unwanted distinction of being "the nul points country," receiving 0 points three times and coming in last six times. When they finally won the 1985 contest, it was a source of pride among the Norwegian population, and the national broadcaster, NRK, took full advantage of being able to showcase Norway and its achievements in front of over 500 million television viewers. By the autumn of 1985, NRK had decided to hold the next year's contest at the Grieghallen in Bergen, turning down other bids from capital Oslo, and main cities of Stavanger, Sandnes and Trondheim. Bergen is the northernmost city to have ever hosted the Eurovision Song Contest.

As this was the first time Norway hosted a Eurovision Song Contest, NRK commissioned a lavish budget for the event, turning Grieghallen into a Viking-esque "ice palace" for the live show, complete with white and pastel neon lights for the stage. In addition, NRK also had a special diamond-encrusted dress made for presenter Åse Kleveland for her opening number. The prized dress, which weighed upwards of 15 pounds (6.8 kg), is still available for viewing at NRK's costuming department at Marienlyst in Oslo.

Åse Kleveland, a well-known folk guitarist who was President of the Norwegian Association of Musicians and a former Eurovision entrant in 1966, sang the multilingual "Welcome to Music" as the opening act, incorporating English and French primarily, in addition to other European languages. BBC commentator Terry Wogan, at the close of Kleveland's number, dryly remarked, "Katie Boyle (a former Eurovision host for the UK) never sang, did she?"

During her opening speech, Kleveland said of Norway's road in the contest, "For those of you who have followed Norway's course through the history of the Eurovision Song Contest, you will know that it has been quite thorny, in fact. So, imagine our joy when last year we finally won, and the pleasure we feel today, being able to welcome 700 million viewers to the top of Europe, to Norway, and to Bergen."

The intersong videos introducing each participant, traditionally named 'postcards' were for the only time, represented as actual picture postcards sent to each nation. Each video began with clips of various scenic views of a part of Norway, which then 'flipped' to reveal a message of greeting, written in the language of the upcoming song, alongside details of the title, author and composer. The postage stamp on each card (a representation of a genuine Norwegian postage stamp) was linked to the theme of the video content. The postcard then 'flipped' back to the picture side, where the performing artist had been superimposed onto the image. After the video, Åse Kleveland gave details of the entry and introduced the conductors in a mix of English and French, reading from cards represented by the flag of the upcoming country.

One of the interval acts presented featured Norwegian musicians Sissel Kyrkjebø and Steinar Ofsdal, accompanied by Norwegian national broadcasting orchestra, Kringkastingsorkesteret (KORK). They opened with the traditional song of the city of Bergen, Udsikter fra Ulriken (also known as "Nystemte'n"), and presented a number of familiar tunes while showing the sights and sounds of Bergen area. Ofsdal played a range of traditional Norwegian folk instruments such as accordion, recorder and hardingfele. The presentation launched Kyrkjebø into a career as an internationally recognized artist.

Participating countriesEdit

Iceland competed for the first time, as the national broadcaster RÚV had finally cemented their satellite television connections with the rest of Europe.[1]

Greece withdrew, as the contest coincided with Holy Saturday on the Eastern Orthodox Church liturgical calendar. Their entry would have been "Wagon-lit" (Βάγκον λι), performed by Polina, who was backing vocalist of Elpida at the 1979 contest (Elpida represented Cyprus this year). Prior to their withdrawal, they were set to be 18th in the running order between Sweden and Denmark.[2] Italian broadcaster RAI, on the other hand, decided not to send any delegation to Bergen.

ConductorsEdit

Each performance had a conductor who directed the orchestra.[3][2]

Returning artistsEdit

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Elpida   Cyprus 1979 (for   Greece)

Participants and resultsEdit

R/O Country Artist Song Language[4][5] Points Place[6]
1   Luxembourg Sherisse Laurence "L'Amour de ma vie" French 117 3
2   Yugoslavia Doris Dragović "Željo moja" (Жељо моја) Serbo-Croatian 49 11
3   France Cocktail Chic "Européennes" French 13 17
4   Norway Ketil Stokkan "Romeo" Norwegian 44 12
5   United Kingdom Ryder "Runner in the Night" English 72 7
6   Iceland ICY "Gleðibankinn" Icelandic 19 16
7   Netherlands Frizzle Sizzle "Alles heeft ritme" Dutch 40 13
8   Turkey Klips ve Onlar "Halley" Turkish[a] 53 9
9   Spain Cadillac "Valentino" Spanish 51 10
10   Switzerland Daniela Simons "Pas pour moi" French 140 2
11   Israel Moti Giladi and Sarai Tzuriel "Yavo Yom" (יבוא יום) Hebrew 7 19
12   Ireland Luv Bug "You Can Count On Me" English 96 4
13   Belgium Sandra Kim "J'aime la vie" French 176 1
14   Germany Ingrid Peters "Über die Brücke geh'n" German 62 8
15   Cyprus Elpida "Tora zo" (Τώρα ζω) Greek 4 20
16   Austria Timna Brauer "Die Zeit ist einsam" German 12 18
17   Sweden Lasse Holm and Monica Törnell "E' de' det här du kallar kärlek?" Swedish 78 5
18   Denmark Lise Haavik "Du er fuld af løgn" Danish 77 6
19   Finland Kari Kuivalainen "Never the End" Finnish 22 15
20   Portugal Dora "Não sejas mau para mim" Portuguese 28 14

Detailed voting resultsEdit

The winning song, Belgium's "J'aime la vie," received points from every jury (Belgium received five sets of 12 points; every country awarded Belgium at least five points except for Germany, which gave them just one point). Belgium was the leader in the voting from the results of the second jury out of twenty, in the longest winning stretch during voting since 1974. Switzerland was behind Belgium in nearly every part of the voting, but Belgium had a commanding lead from the very beginning. Traditionally some juries give high points to the host country's entrant, but this did not happen this year; no jury gave Norway's song "Romeo" more than six points out of a possible 12.

Belgium scored an absolute record at the time, with Sandra Kim earning a never seen before number of 176 points (that record remained seven years until the 1993 contest, with Ireland scoring 187 points), an average of 9.26 points per voting nation. Kim received 77.2% of the maximum possible score, which, as of 2019, still ranks 8th among all Eurovision winners.

Detailed voting results[7][8]
Total score
Luxembourg
Yugoslavia
France
Norway
United Kingdom
Iceland
Netherlands
Turkey
Spain
Switzerland
Israel
Ireland
Belgium
Germany
Cyprus
Austria
Sweden
Denmark
Finland
Portugal
Contestants
Luxembourg 117 5 8 12 8 1 8 2 4 7 10 12 8 10 10 2 4 6
Yugoslavia 49 2 7 5 7 3 3 1 3 4 12 1 1
France 13 3 7 3
Norway 44 4 4 2 6 6 5 6 6 5
United Kingdom 72 4 10 6 6 2 4 2 5 2 3 8 8 10 2
Iceland 19 5 2 6 4 2
Netherlands 40 1 2 7 1 8 10 1 3 7
Turkey 53 6 12 2 6 8 3 6 8 2
Spain 51 7 4 6 1 2 8 1 5 3 7 3 1 3
Switzerland 140 12 6 7 5 5 3 12 10 4 12 10 12 5 4 12 4 7 10
Israel 7 1 1 5
Ireland 96 3 8 3 2 8 5 12 6 2 12 7 12 8 8
Belgium 176 10 10 12 8 10 10 10 12 10 10 5 12 1 10 6 6 10 12 12
Germany 62 8 1 12 8 7 8 5 7 2 4
Cyprus 4 3 1
Austria 12 2 1 2 6 1
Sweden 78 5 7 2 7 3 12 3 7 12 4 5 6 5
Denmark 77 5 10 6 7 4 5 3 10 4 7 7 4 5
Finland 22 6 1 1 8 3 3
Portugal 28 4 4 4 8 7 1

12 pointsEdit

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
5   Belgium   Finland,   France,   Ireland,   Portugal,   Turkey
  Switzerland   Belgium,   Israel,   Luxembourg,   Netherlands,   Sweden
3   Ireland   Austria,   Denmark,   Spain
2   Luxembourg   Germany,   Norway
  Sweden   Iceland,   Switzerland
1   Germany   United Kingdom
  Turkey   Yugoslavia
  Yugoslavia   Cyprus

SpokespersonsEdit

Each country announced their votes in the order of performance. The following is a list of spokespersons who announced the votes for their respective country.

BroadcastsEdit

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its networks. Non-participating EBU member broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants". Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers.[11] Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the tables below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
  Austria ORF FS1 Ernst Grissemann [12][13][14]
  Belgium RTBF RTBF1 Patrick Duhamel [fr] [15][16][17]
BRT TV1 Luc Appermont [16][17]
  Cyprus RIK RIK Neophytos Taliotis [18][19]
  Denmark DR DR TV Jørgen de Mylius [20][21]
  Finland YLE TV1 Kari Lumikero [fi] [22][23]
2-verkko [fi] Unknown
  France Antenne 2 Patrice Laffont [24][25]
  Germany ARD Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen Ado Schlier [de] [13][17][26][27]
  Iceland RÚV Sjónvarpið Þorgeir Ástvaldsson [is] [28][29]
  Ireland RTÉ RTÉ 1 Brendan Balfe [30][31][32]
RTÉ Radio 1 Larry Gogan
  Israel IBA Israeli Television Unknown [33][34]
Reshet Gimel [he] Unknown
  Luxembourg CLT RTL Télévision Unknown [16][35][36]
RTL plus Unknown
  Netherlands NOS Nederland 1 Leo van der Goot [nl] [17][35][37]
  Norway NRK NRK Fjernsynet, NRK P1, NRK P2 Knut Bjørnsen [38][39][40]
  Portugal RTP RTP1 Unknown [41][42]
  Spain TVE TVE 2 Antonio Gómez Mateo [43][44][45]
  Sweden SVT TV1 Ulf Elfving [10][23][40][46]
RR [sv] SR P3 Jacob Dahlin [10][40]
  Switzerland SRG SSR TV DRS Bernard Thurnheer [de] [13][25][47][48]
TSR[b] Serge Moisson [fr]
TSI Unknown
  Turkey TRT TRT Televizyon Gülgün Baysal [49][50][51]
  United Kingdom BBC BBC1 Terry Wogan [2][52][53][54]
BBC Radio 2 Ray Moore
  Yugoslavia JRT TV Beograd 1 Unknown [55][56][57][58][59]
TV Koper-Capodistria Unknown
TV Ljubljana 1 [sl] Unknown
TV Zagreb 1 Ksenija Urličić
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
  Australia SBS SBS TV[c] Unknown [60]
  Czechoslovakia ČST ČST2[d] Unknown [61]
  Hungary MTV MTV1 Unknown [62]
  Poland TP TP1[e] Unknown [63]
  Soviet Union CT USSR Programme One[f] Unknown [64][65]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Contains some words in English, French, and Italian.
  2. ^ Broadcast through a second audio programme on TSI[25]
  3. ^ Deferred broadcast on 4 May at 19:30 AEST (09:30 UTC)[60]
  4. ^ Delayed broadcast on 2 June 1986 at 17:15 CEST (15:15 UTC)[61]
  5. ^ Delayed broadcast on 24 May 1986 at 20:00 CEST (18:00 UTC)[63]
  6. ^ Delayed broadcast on 30 May 1986 at 22:15 MSD (18:15 UTC)[64]

ReferencesEdit

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  10. ^ a b c Thorsson, Leif; Verhage, Martin (2006). Melodifestivalen genom tiderna : de svenska uttagningarna och internationella finalerna (in Swedish). Stockholm: Premium Publishing. pp. 188–189. ISBN 91-89136-29-2.
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External linksEdit