Open main menu

2018–19 in English football

  (Redirected from 2018-19 in English football)

National teamsEdit

England national football teamEdit

Results and fixturesEdit

FriendliesEdit
2018 FIFA World CupEdit
Group GEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Belgium 3 3 0 0 9 2 +7 9 Advance to knockout stage
2   England 3 2 0 1 8 3 +5 6
3   Tunisia 3 1 0 2 5 8 −3 3
4   Panama 3 0 0 3 2 11 −9 0
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers

Matches

Knockout stageEdit
2018–19 UEFA Nations League AEdit
Group 4Edit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation      
1   England 4 2 1 1 6 5 +1 7 Qualification to Nations League Finals 1–2 2–1
2   Spain 4 2 0 2 12 7 +5 6 2–3 6–0
3   Croatia 4 1 1 2 4 10 −6 4 Relegation to League B 0–0 3–2
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
2019 UEFA Nations League FinalsEdit
UEFA Euro 2020 qualifyingEdit
Group AEdit


Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification          
1   England (X) 2 2 0 0 10 1 +9 6[a] Qualify for final tournament 5–0 10 Sep 14 Nov 7 Sep
2   Czech Republic 3 2 0 1 5 6 −1 6[a] 11 Oct 14 Nov 3–0 2–1
3   Kosovo (X) 3 1 2 0 5 4 +1 5 17 Nov 7 Sep 14 Oct 1–1
4   Montenegro 4 0 2 2 3 10 −7 2[b] 1–5 10 Sep 1–1 11 Oct
5   Bulgaria 4 0 2 2 5 7 −2 2[b] 14 Oct 17 Nov 2–3 1–1
Updated to match(es) played on 10 June 2019. Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(X) Assured of at least play-offs.
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Head-to-head points: England 3, Czech Republic 0.
  2. ^ a b Head-to-head away goals: Montenegro 1, Bulgaria 0.

England U-21 national football teamEdit

2019 UEFA European Under-21 Championship qualificationEdit

Group 4Edit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification            
1   England 10 8 2 0 23 4 +19 26 Final tournament 0–0 2–1 3–1 3–0 7–0
2   Netherlands 10 5 3 2 21 6 +15 18 1–1 3–0 1–2 3–0 8–0
3   Ukraine 10 5 2 3 18 12 +6 17 0–2 1–1 3–1 3–2 1–0
4   Scotland 10 4 2 4 13 13 0 14 0–2 2–0 0–2 1–1 3–0
5   Latvia 10 0 4 6 5 18 −13 4 1–2 0–3 1–1 0–2 0–0
6   Andorra 10 0 3 7 1 28 −27 3 0–1 0–1 0–6 1–1 0–0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

2019 UEFA European Under-21 ChampionshipEdit

The final draw was held on 23 November 2018, 18:00 CET (UTC+1), in Bologna.[2] The 12 teams are drawn into three groups of four teams. Hosts Italy are assigned to position A1 in the draw, while the other teams are seeded according to their coefficient ranking following the end of the qualifying stage, calculated based on the following:[3]

England U-19 national football teamEdit

2018 UEFA European Under-19 ChampionshipEdit

Group BEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   Ukraine 3 2 1 0 4 2 +2 7 Knockout stage and
2019 FIFA U-20 World Cup
2   France 3 2 0 1 11 2 +9 6
3   England 3 1 1 1 4 8 −4 4 FIFA U-20 World Cup play-off
4   Turkey 3 0 0 3 2 9 −7 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Knockout stageEdit

England U-17 national football teamEdit

2019 UEFA European Under-17 ChampionshipEdit

Group BEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   France 3 2 1 0 7 3 +4 7 Knockout stage
2   Netherlands 3 2 0 1 7 4 +3 6
3   England 3 1 1 1 6 7 −1 4
4   Sweden 3 0 0 3 3 9 −6 0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers

England women's national football teamEdit

Results and fixturesEdit

FriendliesEdit
2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA)Edit
UEFA Group 1Edit


Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification          
1   England 8 7 1 0 29 1 +28 22 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 0–0 6–0 4–0 5–0
2   Wales 8 5 2 1 7 3 +4 17 0–3 3–0 1–0 1–0
3   Russia 8 4 1 3 16 13 +3 13 1–3 0–0 3–0 3–0
4   Bosnia and Herzegovina 8 1 0 7 3 19 −16 3[a] 0–2 0–1 1–6 0–2
5   Kazakhstan 8 1 0 7 2 21 −19 3[a] 0–6 0–1 0–3 0–2
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Head-to-head results: Kazakhstan 0–2 Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina 0–2 Kazakhstan (tied on head-to-head results, ranked on total goal difference).
2019 SheBelieves CupEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1   England (C) 3 2 1 0 7 3 +4 7
2   United States (H) 3 1 2 0 5 4 +1 5
3   Japan 3 1 1 1 5 6 −1 4
4   Brazil 3 0 0 3 2 6 −4 0
Source: USSoccer
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) goals scored; 4) head-to-head result; 5) FIFA ranking.
(C) Champion; (H) Host.
2019 FIFA Women's World CupEdit
Group DEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   England 3 3 0 0 5 1 +4 9 Advance to knockout stage
2   Japan 3 1 1 1 2 3 −1 4
3   Argentina 3 0 2 1 3 4 −1 2
4   Scotland 3 0 1 2 5 7 −2 1
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
Knockout stageEdit

England women's national under-20 football teamEdit

2018 FIFA U-20 Women's World CupEdit

Group BEdit

The official draw was held on 8 March 2018 at the Rennes Opera House in Rennes.[4]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   England 3 2 1 0 10 3 +7 7 Knockout stage
2   North Korea 3 2 0 1 5 5 0 6
3   Mexico 3 1 0 2 5 10 −5 3
4   Brazil 3 0 1 2 4 6 −2 1
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Knockout stageEdit

England women's national under-17 football teamEdit

2019 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship qualificationEdit

Group 5Edit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1   England (Q) 3 3 0 0 15 0 +15 9 Elite round
2   Iceland (Q) 3 2 0 1 7 2 +5 6
3   Azerbaijan (X) 3 0 1 2 1 9 −8 1 Elite round if among four best third-placed teams
4   Moldova (H, E) 3 0 1 2 1 13 −12 1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers
(E) Eliminated; (H) Host; (Q) Qualified to the phase indicated; (X) ?.

UEFA competitionsEdit

UEFA Champions LeagueEdit

Group stageEdit

Group BEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification BAR TOT INT PSV
1   Barcelona 6 4 2 0 14 5 +9 14 Advance to knockout phase 1–1 2–0 4–0
2   Tottenham Hotspur 6 2 2 2 9 10 −1 8[a] 2–4 1–0 2–1
3   Inter Milan 6 2 2 2 6 7 −1 8[a] Transfer to Europa League 1–1 2–1 1–1
4   PSV Eindhoven 6 0 2 4 6 13 −7 2 1–2 2–2 1–2
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Head-to-head away goals: Tottenham Hotspur 1, Inter Milan 0.
Group CEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification PAR LIV NAP ZVE
1   Paris Saint-Germain 6 3 2 1 17 9 +8 11 Advance to knockout phase 2–1 2–2 6–1
2   Liverpool 6 3 0 3 9 7 +2 9[a] 3–2 1–0 4–0
3   Napoli 6 2 3 1 7 5 +2 9[a] Transfer to Europa League 1–1 1–0 3–1
4   Red Star Belgrade 6 1 1 4 5 17 −12 4 1–4 2–0 0–0
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Goals in all group matches: Liverpool 9, Napoli 7.
Group FEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification MC LYO SHK HOF
1   Manchester City 6 4 1 1 16 6 +10 13 Advance to knockout phase 1–2 6–0 2–1
2   Lyon 6 1 5 0 12 11 +1 8 2–2 2–2 2–2
3   Shakhtar Donetsk 6 1 3 2 8 16 −8 6 Transfer to Europa League 0–3 1–1 2–2
4   1899 Hoffenheim 6 0 3 3 11 14 −3 3 1–2 3–3 2–3
Source: UEFA
Group HEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification JUV MU VAL YB
1   Juventus 6 4 0 2 9 4 +5 12 Advance to knockout phase 1–2 1–0 3–0
2   Manchester United 6 3 1 2 7 4 +3 10 0–1 0–0 1–0
3   Valencia 6 2 2 2 6 6 0 8 Transfer to Europa League 0–2 2–1 3–1
4   Young Boys 6 1 1 4 4 12 −8 4 2–1 0–3 1–1
Source: UEFA

Knockout phaseEdit

Round of 16Edit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Schalke 04   2–10   Manchester City 2–3 0–7
Manchester United   3–3 (a)   Paris Saint-Germain 0–2 3–1
Tottenham Hotspur   4–0   Borussia Dortmund 3–0 1–0
Liverpool   3–1   Bayern Munich 0–0 3–1
Quarter-finalsEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Liverpool   6–1   Porto 2–0 4–1
Tottenham Hotspur   4–4 (a)   Manchester City 1–0 3–4
Manchester United   0–4[A]   Barcelona 0–1 0–3

Notes

  1. ^ Order of legs reversed after original draw, in order to avoid a scheduling conflict with the Manchester City v Tottenham Hotspur match in the same city.
Semi-finalsEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Tottenham Hotspur   3–3 (a)   Ajax 0–1 3–2
Barcelona   3–4   Liverpool 3–0 0–4
FinalEdit

The final will be played on 1 June 2019 at the Wanda Metropolitano in Madrid. The "home" team (for administrative purposes) was determined by an additional draw held after the quarter-final and semi-final draws.[5]

Tottenham Hotspur  0–2  Liverpool
Report

UEFA Europa LeagueEdit

Qualifying phase and play-off roundEdit

Second qualifying roundEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Aberdeen   2–4   Burnley 1–1 1–3 (a.e.t.)
Third qualifying roundEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
İstanbul Başakşehir   0–1   Burnley 0–0 0–1
Play-off roundEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Olympiacos   4–2   Burnley 3–1 1–1

Group stageEdit

Group EEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification ARS SPO VOR QRB
1   Arsenal 6 5 1 0 12 2 +10 16 Advance to knockout phase 0–0 4–2 1–0
2   Sporting CP 6 4 1 1 13 3 +10 13 0–1 3–0 2–0
3   Vorskla Poltava 6 1 0 5 4 13 −9 3[a] 0–3 1–2 0–1
4   Qarabağ 6 1 0 5 2 13 −11 3[a] 0–3 1–6 0–1
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Goal difference in all group matches: Vorskla Poltava –9, Qarabağ –11.
Group LEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification CHL BATE VID PAOK
1   Chelsea 6 5 1 0 12 3 +9 16 Advance to knockout phase 3–1 1–0 4–0
2   BATE Borisov 6 3 0 3 9 9 0 9 0–1 2–0 1–4
3   MOL Vidi 6 2 1 3 5 7 −2 7 2–2 0–2 1–0
4   PAOK 6 1 0 5 5 12 −7 3 0–1 1–3 0–2
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers

Knockout phaseEdit

Round of 32Edit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Malmö FF   1–5   Chelsea 1–2 0–3
BATE Borisov   1–3   Arsenal 1–0 0–3
Round of 16Edit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Chelsea   8–0   Dynamo Kyiv 3–0 5–0
Rennes   3–4   Arsenal 3–1 0–3
Quarter-finalsEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Arsenal   3–0[A]   Napoli 2–0 1–0
Slavia Prague   3–5   Chelsea 0–1 3–4

Notes

  1. ^ Order of legs reversed after original draw, in order to avoid a scheduling conflict with the Chelsea v Slavia Prague match in the same city.
Semi-finalsEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Arsenal   7–3   Valencia 3–1 4–2
Eintracht Frankfurt   2–2 (3–4 p)   Chelsea 1–1 1–1 (a.e.t.)
FinalEdit

The final will be played on 29 May 2019 at the Olympic Stadium in Baku. The "home" team (for administrative purposes) was determined by an additional draw held after the quarter-final and semi-final draws.[5]

Chelsea  4–1  Arsenal
Report
Attendance: 51,370[7]

UEFA Youth LeagueEdit

UEFA Champions League PathEdit

Group BEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification BAR TOT INT PSV
1   Barcelona 6 3 2 1 8 6 +2 11 Round of 16 0–2 2–1 2–1
2   Tottenham Hotspur 6 2 3 1 10 8 +2 9 Play-offs 1–1 2–4 2–0
3   Internazionale 6 2 1 3 10 9 +1 7 0–2 1–1 3–0
4   PSV Eindhoven 6 1 2 3 6 11 −5 5 1–1 2–2 2–1
Source: UEFA
Group CEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification LIV PAR NAP ZVE
1   Liverpool 6 4 1 1 17 7 +10 13 Round of 16 5–2 5–0 2–1
2   Paris Saint-Germain 6 4 1 1 13 10 +3 13 Play-offs 3–2 0–0 2–1
3   Napoli 6 1 3 2 9 15 −6 6 1–1 2–5 5–3
4   Red Star Belgrade 6 0 1 5 6 13 −7 1 0–2 0–1 1–1
Source: UEFA
Group FEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification HOF LYO MCI SHK
1   1899 Hoffenheim 6 3 2 1 15 10 +5 11 Round of 16 3–1 5–2 1–1
2   Lyon 6 3 2 1 13 8 +5 11 Play-offs 3–3 2–0 2–0
3   Manchester City 6 2 1 3 10 14 −4 7 2–1 1–4 4–1
4   Shakhtar Donetsk 6 0 3 3 5 11 −6 3 1–2 1–1 1–1
Source: UEFA
Group HEdit
Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification MUN JUV YBO VAL
1   Manchester United 6 5 1 0 20 7 +13 16 Round of 16 4–1 6–2 4–0
2   Juventus 6 3 1 2 11 11 0 10 Play-offs 2–2 2–1 3–0
3   Young Boys 6 2 1 3 12 15 −3 7 1–2 4–2 3–3
4   Valencia 6 0 1 5 4 14 −10 1 1–2 0–1 0–1
Source: UEFA

Domestic Champions PathEdit

First roundEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Chelsea   14–1   Molde 10–1 4–0
Second roundEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Elfsborg   0–9   Chelsea 0–3 0–6

Play-offsEdit

Team 1  Score  Team 2
PAOK   0–1   Tottenham Hotspur
Chelsea   3–1   Monaco

Knockout phaseEdit

Round of 16Edit
Team 1  Score  Team 2
Chelsea   2–1   Montpellier
Midtjylland   3–1   Manchester United
Dinamo Zagreb   2–1 (4–3 p)   Liverpool
Porto   2–0   Tottenham Hotspur
Quarter-finalsEdit
Team 1  Score  Team 2
Chelsea   2–2 (4–2 p)   Dinamo Zagreb
Semi-finalsEdit
Team 1  Score  Team 2
Barcelona   2–2 (4–5 p)   Chelsea
FinalEdit

The final was played on 29 April 2019 at Colovray Stadium, Nyon.[8][9]

Porto  3–1  Chelsea
Report
Referee: François Letexier (France)

UEFA Women's Champions LeagueEdit

Knockout phaseEdit

Round of 32Edit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
SFK 2000   0–11   Chelsea 0–5 0–6
Atlético Madrid   3–1   Manchester City 1–1 2–0
Round of 16Edit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Chelsea   7–0   Fiorentina 1–0 6–0
Quarter-finalsEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Chelsea   3–2   Paris Saint-Germain 2–0 1–2
Semi-finalsEdit
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Lyon   3–2   Chelsea 2–1 1–1

Men's footballEdit

League Promoted to league Relegated from league
Premier League
Championship
League One
League Two
National League

Premier LeagueEdit

In one of the closest title races since the formation of the Premier League, with a new points total set for finishing second, Manchester City became the first top-flight team in a decade to retain their title in part thanks to a late run that saw them win their last 14 games – despite falling short in the Champions League, the Sky Blues became the first team in English football to complete a domestic treble, by once again retaining the League Cup and securing their first FA Cup since 2011. Liverpool finished second, missing out on ending their wait for a league title once again, despite pushing City all the way to the final day and once again finishing their league campaign unbeaten at Anfield as well as having been top at Christmas; however, it was in Europe that the Reds enjoyed more success as they made it to a second successive Champions League final against the odds, including a stunning 4-0 victory at home to Barcelona - and ultimately made amends for the previous season's loss, winning their sixth European title and their first under manager Jurgen Klopp.

The battle for the top four also proved to be a close-run battle, with each of Tottenham Hotspur, Arsenal, Chelsea and Manchester United fighting for the last two Champions League spots – in the end, securing the spots for Europe's elite competition were Chelsea, who also reached the final of the League Cup and won the Europa League to at least ensure a trophy but endured another disappointing league campaign that saw talk of a potential third title in five seasons rapidly fade away in the New Year, and Tottenham Hotspur, who also saw talk of a potential title win diminish owing in part to a poor run of league form from March onwards; however, the North London side more than made up for this by also reaching their first ever Champions League final in a European run that saw them narrowly edge past both Manchester City and Dutch front-runners Ajax, ultimately falling to fellow English side Liverpool in a tight final. Arsenal and Manchester United were forced to settle for fifth and sixth respectively, the Gunners missing out on Champions League qualification once again on two different fronts, falling to Chelsea in the Europa League final to mark a disappointing end to Unai Emery's first season in charge, whilst the Red Devils endured a problematic season across all tournaments with even the sacking of manager José Mourinho and then the temporary appointment of United legend Ole Gunnar Solskjær (an act later made permanent) failing to provide much spark to the Manchester side.

Wolverhampton Wanderers enjoyed the best top-flight season for a newly promoted side since Ipswich Town in 2001, finishing 7th; this represented their best finish in the English pyramid since finishing 6th in 1980. 7th was also enough for the Europa League qualifying rounds, and this, added to a run to the semi-finals of the FA Cup - their longest such run in 21 years - earned Portuguese manager Nuno Espírito Santo and his team plenty of praise. Leicester City endured a troubling season both on and off the pitch, first suffering tragedy with the death of club owner Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha in a helicopter crash shortly after a 1-1 home draw with West Ham United – with the Foxes then enduring a run of poor results against lesser sides in 2019, including a third-round FA Cup exit at the hands of League Two side Newport County, resulting in the dismissal of manager Claude Puel; however, the appointment of former Liverpool manager Brendan Rodgers helped push the club back up the table and to a top-ten finish.

Watford finished not far behind the Foxes, also enjoying their greatest top-flight season since finishing 2nd in 1984, the Hornets breaking the 50 point barrier and narrowly missing out on the top ten on top of reaching the final of the FA Cup for the first time in over 30 years, ultimately failing at the hands of Manchester City. Having successfully qualified for the qualifying rounds of the Europa League the previous season, Burnley endured a troublesome first half of the campaign that saw them first narrowly miss out on a Europa League group stage spot and then find themselves firmly in the relegation zone at Christmas; however, the return of influential goalkeeper Tom Heaton after Boxing Day saw the Clarets fight their way out of the bottom three with games to spare. A very poor start to the season saw Southampton stuck in a relegation battle for the second season running, resulting in the dismissal of Mark Hughes in early December – despite the threat of the drop hanging over them until the closing months, a resurgence under former RB Leipzig manager and Austrian Ralph Hasenhüttl saw the Saints climb away from the bottom three and towards safety with games to spare.

At the bottom of the table, both Huddersfield Town and Fulham endured early relegations – the two clubs never really looking like escaping the drop; whilst the Terriers (who arguably found themselves suffering from second season syndrome) saved some face by narrowly avoiding breaking the records for the most defeats and most goals conceded in a 38-game season, the London side fell back into the Championship at the first time of asking in almost similar fashion to their previous top-flight season by having three different managers throughout the campaign and conceding more goals than anyone else. The fight to avoid the final spot proved to be much closer, with Cardiff City once again falling back into the second tier after just one season – a consequence of a poor start to the season and several defeats from winnable games, though the Bluebirds at least went down fighting in a season also marked with off-field tragedy, with the death of club record signing Emiliano Sala on his way to joining the team for the first time; in addition, as a result of Cardiff's relegation and Swansea's failure to mount a real promotion charge, it meant that the Premier League would not have a Welsh presence for the first time in eight seasons.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Manchester City (C) 38 32 2 4 95 23 +72 98 Qualification for the Champions League group stage
2 Liverpool 38 30 7 1 89 22 +67 97
3 Chelsea 38 21 9 8 63 39 +24 72
4 Tottenham Hotspur 38 23 2 13 67 39 +28 71
5 Arsenal 38 21 7 10 73 51 +22 70 Qualification for the Europa League group stage[a]
6 Manchester United 38 19 9 10 65 54 +11 66
7 Wolverhampton Wanderers 38 16 9 13 47 46 +1 57 Qualification for the Europa League second qualifying round[a]
8 Everton 38 15 9 14 54 46 +8 54
9 Leicester City 38 15 7 16 51 48 +3 52
10 West Ham United 38 15 7 16 52 55 −3 52
11 Watford 38 14 8 16 52 59 −7 50
12 Crystal Palace 38 14 7 17 51 53 −2 49
13 Newcastle United 38 12 9 17 42 48 −6 45
14 Bournemouth 38 13 6 19 56 70 −14 45
15 Burnley 38 11 7 20 45 68 −23 40
16 Southampton 38 9 12 17 45 65 −20 39
17 Brighton & Hove Albion 38 9 9 20 35 60 −25 36
18 Cardiff City (R) 38 10 4 24 34 69 −35 34 Relegation to the EFL Championship
19 Fulham (R) 38 7 5 26 34 81 −47 26
20 Huddersfield Town (R) 38 3 7 28 22 76 −54 16
Source: Premier League
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Goals scored; 4) Play-offs (only if needed to decide champion, teams for relegation or teams for UEFA competitions).
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Since the winners of the EFL Cup and the FA Cup, Manchester City, qualified for the Champions League, the spot given to the FA Cup winners (Europa League group stage) was passed to the sixth-placed team and the spot given to the League Cup winners (Europa League second qualifying round) was passed to the seventh-placed team.

ChampionshipEdit

Despite making a slow start to the season on top of losing star player James Maddison to Leicester City in the summer, Norwich City secured their third promotion to the Premier League in eight seasons – whilst a late run of draws in April threatened to derail the Canaries' hopes, the Norfolk side never looked like falling out of the top two and secured promotion in German head coach Daniel Farke's second season in charge. The battle for second place went down to the wire between Yorkshire sides Leeds United and Sheffield United – but it was ultimately the Blades who won the fight, securing their second promotion in three seasons and returning to the top-flight for the first time since 2007, earning manager Chris Wilder his first taste of the top-flight; as with the previous few seasons, a horrendous late-season run ultimately proved costly to Leeds, to the point where they only even managed to finish as high as third due to West Bromwich Albion failing to win their own final game of the season; both teams were subsequently knocked out in the play-off semi-finals. Instead taking the final promotion spot were Aston Villa in what proved to be a roller coaster campaign, the Villains making amends for their play-off final loss the previous season and ending a three-year absence from the top-flight in Dean Smith's first season as manager - at the expense of Derby County, who none-the-less enjoyed a fantastic first season under new manager Frank Lampard.

Swansea City's first season in the Championship since 2011 saw them stuck mostly in mid-table – with growing fan protests off-field towards the running of the club that had seen them relegated resulting in the resignation of the Swans' long-time chairman Huw Jenkins in early 2019. Likewise, having been widely tipped to win promotion back to the top-flight at the first attempt, Stoke City endured a largely mediocre league season that saw them fight more to avoid relegation rather than win promotion, draw a staggering 22 times and change managers twice. Having made a strong start to their league season, a collapse in form nearly saw Wigan Athletic relegated from the second tier for the third time in five seasons; however, the Manchester-based club recovered enough in the second half of the season to escape the drop and ensure a second successive season on the second level of league football.

After 17 consecutive seasons in the second tier and a succession of mid-table finishes, Ipswich Town's luck finally gave out and they endured relegation to the third tier for the first time in 62 years, the Tractor Boys never really looking like escaping the drop after falling to the foot of the table in early October and with only five wins all season. Bolton Wanderers finished just above them, falling back into League One on Good Friday after two seasons and in a campaign full of struggle both on and off the pitch, amid severe financial problems on top of nearly having their last run of home games cancelled altogether (and then actually having their last home game against Brentford cancelled); to make matters worse, the Trotters were then forced into administration after the season ended, becoming the first club to have the increased 12-point deduction imposed on them for the following season. Taking the final spot were Rotherham United, who gave themselves a decent chance of escaping the drop, but eventually fell back into the third tier for the second time in three seasons, the Yorkshire club ultimately being let down once again by their atrocious away record - just one win on the road, and one win in their last 48 second tier away games - and a failure to turn any one of their 16 draws into wins or take advantage of their relegation rivals slipping up.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 Norwich City (C, P) 46 27 13 6 93 57 +36 94 Promotion to the Premier League
2 Sheffield United (P) 46 26 11 9 78 41 +37 89
3 Leeds United 46 25 8 13 73 50 +23 83 Qualification for Championship play-offs
4 West Bromwich Albion 46 23 11 12 87 62 +25 80
5 Aston Villa (O, P) 46 20 16 10 82 61 +21 76[a]
6 Derby County 46 20 14 12 69 54 +15 74
7 Middlesbrough 46 20 13 13 49 41 +8 73
8 Bristol City 46 19 13 14 59 53 +6 70
9 Nottingham Forest 46 17 15 14 61 54 +7 66
10 Swansea City 46 18 11 17 65 62 +3 65
11 Brentford 46 17 13 16 73 59 +14 64[b]
12 Sheffield Wednesday 46 16 16 14 60 62 −2 64
13 Hull City 46 17 11 18 66 68 −2 62
14 Preston North End 46 16 13 17 67 67 0 61
15 Blackburn Rovers 46 16 12 18 64 69 −5 60
16 Stoke City 46 11 22 13 45 52 −7 55
17 Birmingham City 46 14 19 13 64 58 +6 52[c]
18 Wigan Athletic 46 13 13 20 51 64 −13 52
19 Queens Park Rangers 46 14 9 23 53 71 −18 51
20 Reading 46 10 17 19 49 66 −17 47
21 Millwall 46 10 14 22 48 64 −16 44
22 Rotherham United (R) 46 8 16 22 52 83 −31 40 Relegation to EFL League One
23 Bolton Wanderers (R) 46 8 8 30 29 78 −49 32
24 Ipswich Town (R) 46 5 16 25 36 77 −41 31
Source: EFL Official Website
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored; 4) Head-to-head results[13]
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. ^ Aston Villa were promoted to the Premier League after beating Derby County in the Play-Off Final.[10]
  2. ^ Brentford were awarded a 1–0 win over Bolton Wanderers due to Bolton's inability to hold the fixture.[11]
  3. ^ Birmingham City were deducted 9 points for failure to comply with the EFL profitability and sustainability rules.[12]

League OneEdit

In one of the most remarkable campaigns of the season and in spite of losing influential manager Nathan Jones to Stoke City in January, Luton Town defied their critics and stormed their way to promotion for the second season running, returning to the Championship for the first time since 2007 and going up as champions – whilst remaining unbeaten at their home ground in the league for the entire season. The fight for the second spot went all the way to the penultimate game with Barnsley, Football League Trophy winners Portsmouth and Sunderland fighting it out; the spot ultimately went to Barnsley, who secured an immediate return to the second-tier in German head coach Daniel Stendel's first season in charge, also impressing with an unbeaten league home record as well. Taking the final promotion place were Charlton Athletic, who dramatically scored in the last minute of normal time against Sunderland in the playoff final to end a 3-year exile from the Championship and consign the Black Cats to another season in League One.

Despite being widely tipped for a top-six finish, Burton Albion endured a largely mixed season that saw them in the bottom half of the table more often than the top, failing to really challenge for an immediate return to the second tier. Blackpool's league season proved to be mediocre, with the Lancashire club failing to mount a real promotion challenge but also not being remotely threatened with relegation – however, it was off the pitch that proved to be more important for the Seasiders, with the removal of Owen Oyston after over 30 years as owner and after years of fan protests and legal battles with former chairman Valērijs Belokoņs, an act widely celebrated by Blackpool fans. Despite making a reasonable start to their first ever season in the third tier, Accrington Stanley endured a sharp drop in form after the new year, with only a run of late wins pushing the side away from the threat of relegation – still a remarkable effort for the Lancashire side.

The second half of the season saw one of the tightest relegation battles in the history of the third tier, with 12 teams remaining in the mix from January onwards – but ultimately, it was Bradford City, Scunthorpe United, Walsall and Plymouth Argyle who fell into League Two; whilst Bradford's relegation came just two years after narrowly missing out on promotion to the Championship and in a season where they had three different managers and Scunthorpe United fell back into the fourth tier after five years in League One, Walsall had actually spent the first couple of weeks challenging for promotion before results rapidly declined and Plymouth Argyle again looked like masterminding an unlikely escape from the drop like they had done the previous campaign, only for results to go against them in the final games of the season. Having been in bottom position for nearly the entire season and 10 points from avoiding relegation after 31 games, a late run of 7 wins and 27 points in their last 15 games ensured that AFC Wimbledon would remain in League One for a fourth consecutive campaign, narrowly surviving on goal difference.


Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 Luton Town (C, P) 46 27 13 6 90 42 +48 94 Promotion to the EFL Championship
2 Barnsley (P) 46 26 13 7 80 39 +41 91
3 Charlton Athletic (O, P) 46 26 10 10 73 40 +33 88 Qualification for League One play-offs[a]
4 Portsmouth 46 25 13 8 83 51 +32 88
5 Sunderland 46 22 19 5 80 47 +33 85
6 Doncaster Rovers 46 20 13 13 76 58 +18 73
7 Peterborough United 46 20 12 14 71 62 +9 72
8 Coventry City 46 18 11 17 54 54 0 65
9 Burton Albion 46 17 12 17 66 57 +9 63
10 Blackpool 46 15 17 14 50 52 −2 62
11 Fleetwood Town 46 16 13 17 58 52 +6 61
12 Oxford United 46 15 15 16 58 64 −6 60
13 Gillingham 46 15 10 21 61 72 −11 55
14 Accrington Stanley 46 14 13 19 51 67 −16 55
15 Bristol Rovers 46 13 15 18 47 50 −3 54
16 Rochdale 46 15 9 22 54 87 −33 54
17 Wycombe Wanderers 46 14 11 21 55 67 −12 53
18 Shrewsbury Town 46 12 16 18 51 59 −8 52
19 Southend United 46 14 8 24 55 68 −13 50
20 AFC Wimbledon 46 13 11 22 42 63 −21 50
21 Plymouth Argyle (R) 46 13 11 22 56 80 −24 50 Relegation to EFL League Two
22 Walsall (R) 46 12 11 23 49 71 −22 47
23 Scunthorpe United (R) 46 12 10 24 53 83 −30 46
24 Bradford City (R) 46 11 8 27 49 77 −28 41
Source: EFL Official Website
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored; 4) Head-to-head results [13]
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. ^ Four teams play for one spot and promotion to the EFL Championship.

League TwoEdit

Just two seasons after returning to the Football League as fifth tier champions and only one year after victory in the Football League Trophy, Lincoln City ended their season with another success to their name with promotion to League One and earning their first promotion to the third tier in over 20 years – despite the closeness of the promotion race, the Lincolnshire side remained in the top two for practically the entire season and mathematically secured first place on Easter Monday. The race for the remaining automatic promotions was a close-ran battle between Mansfield Town, Bury and Milton Keynes Dons; Bury were the second team to ensure promotion, returning to League One at the first attempt, whilst Milton Keynes Dons took the final spot in the last game of the campaign in a winner-takes-all match against Mansfield Town, also securing an immediate return to the third tier and finally giving new manager Paul Tisdale promotion after two unsuccessful play-off final attempts with Exeter City. Taking the final spot through the play-offs were Tranmere Rovers, whose return to the Football League saw the North West club successfully challenge for a second consecutive promotion, winning out against Newport County in the final at Wembley in the dying seconds of extra-time.

Despite narrowly missing out on ending a 32-year exile from the third tier, Newport County enjoyed what proved to be a great season; having looking like missing out on the play-offs altogether, the Welsh side made a late rally and edged their way into the top seven in their final game, a big achievement in a season where they also enjoyed an impressive FA Cup run that saw them make it to the fifth round – beating top-flight Leicester City and second-tier promotion-chasers Middlesbrough – before ultimately falling to Manchester City at Rodney Parade. Oldham Athletic made a strong start to their season before results rapidly fell aware and they fell into mid-table, with not even the appointment of former player Paul Scholes as manager (who then promptly resigned after 7 games) having much impact on the Latics.

In spite of having made a very poor start on their return to the Football League and then only narrowly avoiding breaking the record for the longest winless run, Macclesfield Town defied their critics and scraped their way to safety, in parts thanks to the surprise appointment of former England defender Sol Campbell as manager. Suffering relegation instead were Yeovil Town and Notts County – the Glovers falling out of the Football League just six years after winning promotion to the Championship and sixteen years after entering the fourth tier for the first time, a strong start to the season rapidly falling away in stunning fashion and the Magpies becoming the oldest club in English football to fall into non-league football, having been a member of the Football League since its inception 157 years previously and having never fallen out of the fourth tier before. This also made them the first of the Football League's founder members to suffer automatic relegation from the league, albeit with several of the others having lost (and later regained) their places under the previous election system.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 Lincoln City (C, P) 46 23 16 7 73 43 +30 85 Promotion to EFL League One
2 Bury (P) 46 22 13 11 82 56 +26 79
3 Milton Keynes Dons (P) 46 23 10 13 71 49 +22 79
4 Mansfield Town 46 20 16 10 69 41 +28 76 Qualification for League Two play-offs[a]
5 Forest Green Rovers 46 20 14 12 68 47 +21 74
6 Tranmere Rovers (O, P) 46 20 13 13 63 50 +13 73
7 Newport County 46 20 11 15 59 59 0 71
8 Colchester United 46 20 10 16 65 53 +12 70
9 Exeter City 46 19 13 14 60 49 +11 70
10 Stevenage 46 20 10 16 59 55 +4 70
11 Carlisle United 46 20 8 18 67 62 +5 68
12 Crewe Alexandra 46 19 8 19 60 59 +1 65
13 Swindon Town 46 16 16 14 59 56 +3 64
14 Oldham Athletic 46 16 14 16 67 60 +7 62
15 Northampton Town 46 14 19 13 64 63 +1 61
16 Cheltenham Town 46 15 12 19 57 68 −11 57
17 Grimsby Town 46 16 8 22 45 56 −11 56
18 Morecambe 46 14 12 20 54 70 −16 54
19 Crawley Town 46 15 8 23 51 68 −17 53
20 Port Vale 46 12 13 21 39 55 −16 49
21 Cambridge United 46 12 11 23 40 66 −26 47
22 Macclesfield Town 46 10 14 22 48 74 −26 44
23 Notts County (R) 46 9 14 23 48 84 −36 41 Relegation to the National League
24 Yeovil Town (R) 46 9 13 24 41 66 −25 40
Source: EFL Official Website
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored; 4) Head-to-head results [13]
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. ^ Four teams play for one spot and promotion to EFL League One.

National League Top DivisionEdit

In one of the tightest promotion races in the history of the fifth tier and just two seasons after their spectacular fall into non-league football, Leyton Orient finally returned to the Football League in style, never once looking like falling out of the promotion race and narrowly edging the automatic promotion spot in manager Justin Edinburgh's first full season as manager; the season ended in tragedy, however, following Edinburgh's death from a cardiac arrest the following month. In their first ever season in the fifth tier, Salford City narrowly missed out on automatic promotion - but more than made up for it by winning the play-offs, earning promotion to League Two and the Football League for the first time in their 79-year history, a fantastic achievement for the club.

Despite being rooted to around the bottom of the table for the best part of the season, a late surge in results helped Dover Athletic pull clear of the drop and away to safety – whilst newly relegated Chesterfield very nearly suffered a third consecutive relegation after a large winless run in the league stretching from August to December, before the appointment of veteran manager John Sheridan in the New Year helped the club find their feet and edge away from the bottom.

At the bottom of the table, all four relegated teams were confirmed with at least three games to go – Aldershot Town, Braintree Town, Havant and Waterlooville and Maidstone United. Whilst both Braintree and Havant suffered an immediate relegation back to the National League South (the second time in three seasons for the former), Aldershot Town's relegation came just six seasons after they had dropped out of League Two whilst Maidstone United had been part of the highest level of the National League for three years. However, Aldershot were granted a reprieve from relegation when Gateshead were demoted two divisions (later reduced to one on appeal) for breaching the league's financial regulations.


Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Promotion, qualification or relegation
1 Leyton Orient (C, P) 46 25 14 7 73 35 +38 89 Promoted to EFL League Two
2 Solihull Moors 46 25 11 10 73 43 +30 86 Qualified for the National League play-off semi-finals
3 Salford City (O, P) 46 25 10 11 77 45 +32 85
4 Wrexham 46 25 9 12 58 39 +19 84 Qualified for the National League play-off quarter-finals
5 Fylde 46 22 15 9 72 41 +31 81
6 Harrogate Town 46 21 11 14 78 57 +21 74
7 Eastleigh 46 22 8 16 62 63 −1 74
8 Ebbsfleet United 46 18 13 15 64 50 +14 67
9 Sutton United 46 17 14 15 55 60 −5 65
10 Barrow 46 17 13 16 52 51 +1 64
11 Bromley 46 16 12 18 68 69 −1 60
12 Barnet 46 16 12 18 45 50 −5 60
13 Dover Athletic 46 16 12 18 58 64 −6 60
14 Chesterfield 46 14 17 15 55 53 +2 59
15 Halifax Town 46 13 20 13 44 43 +1 59
16 Hartlepool United 46 15 14 17 56 62 −6 59
17 Gateshead 46 19 9 18 52 48 +4 57[a] Demoted to National League North
18 Dagenham & Redbridge 46 15 11 20 50 56 −6 56
19 Maidenhead United 46 16 6 24 45 70 −25 54
20 Boreham Wood 46 12 16 18 53 65 −12 52
21 Aldershot Town 46 11 11 24 38 67 −29 44[b]
22 Havant & Waterlooville (R) 46 9 13 24 62 84 −22 40 Relegated to National League South
23 Braintree Town (R) 46 11 8 27 48 78 −30 38[c]
24 Maidstone United (R) 46 9 7 30 37 82 −45 34
Source: National League official site
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Number of goals scored; 4) Number of matches won; 5) Head-to-head results [17]
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (P) Promoted; (R) Relegated.
Notes:
  1. ^ Gateshead were deducted 9 points for breach of financial regulations.[14]
  2. ^ Gateshead were demoted to the National League North on the 8th of June 2019 due to financial irregulaties. As a result Aldershot Town were given a reprieve from relegation. [15]
  3. ^ Braintree Town were deducted 3 points for fielding an ineligible player in a game against AFC Fylde.[16]

League play-offsEdit

Football League play-offsEdit

EFL ChampionshipEdit
FinalEdit
Aston Villa2–1Derby County
El Ghazi   44'
McGinn   59'
Report Marriott   81'
Attendance: 85,826
Referee: Paul Tierney
EFL League OneEdit
FinalEdit
Charlton Athletic2–1Sunderland
Report Sarr   5' (o.g.)
Attendance: 76,155
Referee: Andrew Madley
EFL League TwoEdit
FinalEdit