The 1150s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1150, and ended on December 31, 1159.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events

1150

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
LevantEdit
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1151

1152

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
  • Spring – King Baldwin III and his mother, Queen Melisende, are called to intervene in a dispute between Baldwin's aunt Hodierna and her husband Raymond II, count of Tripoli. Hodierna decides to take a long holiday, and travels to Jerusalem, while Raymond escorts her out on the road southwards. On the way back to Tripoli, a group of Assassins stabs him to death at the southern gate of the city. The garrison rushes to arms and pours into the streets, slaying every Muslim in their way, but the Assassins manage to escape; the motive of their act is never known.[23]
  • Baldwin III demands more authority and blames Manasses, ruler of Ramla, for interfering with his legal succession as ruler of Jerusalem. He demands a second coronation from Patriarch Fulcher separated from Melisende. Fulcher refuses, and as a kind of self-coronation Baldwin parades through the city streets with laurel wreaths on his head. Before the High Court (Haute Cour) the decision is made to divide the kingdom into two districts.
  • Baldwin III begins a civil war against Melisende and launches an invasion in the south. He captures the castle of Mirabel, which is defended by Manasses. Baldwin spares his life and is exiled, Nablus thereupon surrenders soon after. Melisende seeks refuge in the Tower of David with her younger son, the 16-year-old Amalric. Baldwin enters Jerusalem, he allows his mother to retain Nablus and the neighbourhood as her dower.[24]
  • Summer – Nur al-Din, Seljuk ruler (atabeg) of Aleppo, re-captures most of Crusader territory in the Orontes Valley – reducing the Principality of Antioch to little more than a narrow coastal strip along the Mediterranean. The County of Tripoli remains unchanged and Jerusalem remains a potential threat with ambitions to expand eastward, while also striving to dominate the Fatimid Caliphate in Egypt.[25]
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
  • April 6 – King Stephen has his nobles swear fealty to his son Eustace, as the rightful heir of the English throne. Theobald, archbishop of Canterbury, and other bishops refuse to crown Eustace favouring Henry of Anjou to claim the throne instead. Stephen confiscates their property and Theobald is forced into exile in Flanders.
  • Stephen besieges Newbury Castle and holds the young William as a hostage to ensure that his father, John Marshal, keeps his promise to surrender the castle. When John refuses to comply, Stephen threatened to nave the young boy catapulted over the walls. After this, William remains a crown hostage for many months.[27]
AfricaEdit
MesoamericaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1153

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
LevantEdit
EnglandEdit
  • Spring – The 19-year-old Henry of Anjou lands with a Norman fleet (some 40 ships) on the south coast of England. He defeats King Stephen (a cousin of his mother, Queen Matilda) with a small army at Malmesbury. Henry travels north through the Midlands, while a temporary truce is accepted. Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester, announces his support for the cause. Hoping to dethrone Stephen and replace him with Matilda.[29]
  • May 24 – King David I dies after a 29-year reign at Carlisle Castle. He is succeeded by his grandson, the 12-year-old Malcolm IV (Virgo). Malcolm is the eldest son of Henry, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, who is crowned as ruler of Scotland at Scone Priory on May 27. Because of his young age, Donnchad (or Duncan) becomes Malcolm's regent and royal adviser.[30]
  • August – Stephen assemble troops to renew the siege of Wallingford Castle in a final attempt to take the stronghold. Henry of Anjou marches south to relieve the siege, arriving with a small army of mercenaries. He places Stephen's besieging troops under siege themselves. Stephen agrees to make a truce and accepts Henry as heir to the English throne.[31]
  • November 6 – The Treaty of Wallingford: Henry of Anjou and Stephen ratifies the terms of a permanent peace under the direction of Archbishop Theobald of Bec. Ending the civil war (The Anarchy) – between England and Normandy after 18-years. The treaty grants the throne to Stephen for the duration of his life, but makes Henry the heir apparent.[32]
EuropeEdit
AsiaEdit
AfricaEdit

By topicEdit

DemographyEdit
ReligionEdit

1154

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
  • April 18Nur al-Din, Seljuk ruler (atabeg) of Aleppo, encamps before Damascus and overthrows Mujir al-Din by force with support of the Jewish citizens, who open the eastern gate to the bulk of his army. Mujir flees to the citadel, but capitulates after only a few hours. He is offered his life and the Emirate of Homs. A few weeks later Mujir is suspected of plotting with old friends in Damascus and is exiled to Baghdad. Damascus is annexed to Zangid territory and all of Syria is unified under the authority of Nur al-Din, from Edessa in the north to the Hauran to the south.[36]
  • Nur al-Din establishes the Al-Nuri Hospital in Damascus. The hospital has outpatient consulting rooms, a conference room, prayer hall, vestibules and bathrooms.[37]
EuropeEdit
AfricaEdit
EnglandEdit

By topicEdit

Art and CultureEdit
ReligionEdit

1155

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1156

By placeEdit

LevantEdit
  • Spring – Raynald of Châtillon, prince of Antioch, makes an alliance with Thoros II (the Great), ruler of Armenian Cilicia. He invades Cyprus and conducts a widespread plundering of the Byzantine island.[46] The Crusaders and the Armenian forces march up and down the island robbing and pillaging every building, church and convent as well as shops and private houses. The crops are burnt; the herds are rounded up – together with all the population – and driven down to the coast. The massacre lasts about three weeks, on the rumor of a Byzantine fleet in the offing, Raynald gives the order for embarkation. The Crusader ships are loaded with booty, and every Cypriot is forced to ransom himself.[47]
EuropeEdit
 
The murder of St. Henry by Lalli, painting by Karl Anders Ekman (1854)
AfricaEdit
  • The independent city-state Sfax revolts against Norman occupation. Almohad forces conquer the city and massacre the Christian citizens.[49]
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

Art and ScienceEdit

1157

1158

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
  • Autumn – Emperor Manuel I (Komnenos) sets out from Constantinople at the head of a expeditionary army. He marches to Cillicia; and while the main army follows the coast road eastwards – Manuel hurries ahead with a force of only 500 cavalry. He manages to surprise King Thoros II (the Great), who has participated in the attack on Cyprus (see 1156). Thoros flees into the mountains and Cilicia is occupied by the Byzantines.[58]
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

EconomyEdit
EducationEdit
ReligionEdit

1159

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

1150

1151

1152

1153

1154

1155

1156

1157

 
Tomoe Gozen

1158

1159

DeathsEdit

1150

1151

1152

1153

1154

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1157

1158

1159

ReferencesEdit

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