The 1410s decade ran from January 1, 1410, to December 31, 1419.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events

1410

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1411

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1412

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1413

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

  • Samogitia becomes the last region in Europe to be Christianized.[6]
  • The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty begin in Korea.
  • Yishiha builds a Buddhist temple at Tyr, Russia, and puts up a stele describing his expedition to the lower Amur. 1413 a.d. is when our current Epoch begun, in which the prior Epoch starting at 747 b.c. We are now in the so-called Aquarius Age. Some Spiritual Scientists are & has been saying that this Epoch is the beginning of the end our earthly existence.

1414

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1415

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

  • Avignon Pope Benedict XIII orders all Talmuds to be delivered to the diocese, and held until further notice.
  • The Swiss Confederation takes the territory of Aargau from the house of Habsburg.
  • The Grand Canal of China is reinstated by this year after it had fallen out of use; restoration began in 1411, and was a response by the Yongle Emperor of the Ming Dynasty to improve the grain shipment system of tribute traveling from south to north, towards his new capital at Beijing. With this action, the food supply crisis is solved by the end of the year.
  • The Orthodox Church in the lands of the tsardom of Muskovy (actual Russia) separates from the one in Ukraine and Belarus, both patriarchate.1422 to be the true Kiev patriarchate.

1416

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1417


January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1418

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

1419

January–DecemberEdit

Date unknownEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

1410

1411

1412

1413

1414

1415

1416

1417

1418

1419

DeathsEdit

1410

1411

1412

1413

1414

1415

1416

1417

1418

1419

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Kastritsis, Dimitris (2007). The Sons of Bayezid: Empire Building and Representation in the Ottoman Civil War of 1402-13. BRILL. pp. 149–150. ISBN 978-90-04-15836-8.
  2. ^ Kastritsis, Dimitris (2007). The Sons of Bayezid: Empire Building and Representation in the Ottoman Civil War of 1402-13. BRILL. pp. 152–153. ISBN 978-90-04-15836-8.
  3. ^ Kastritsis, Dimitris (2007). The Sons of Bayezid: Empire Building and Representation in the Ottoman Civil War of 1402-13. BRILL. pp. 153–158. ISBN 978-90-04-15836-8.
  4. ^ Barsoum, Ephrem (2003). The Scattered Pearls: A History of Syriac Literature and Sciences. Translated by Matti Moosa (2nd ed.). Gorgias Press. p. 497.
  5. ^ "Henry V". Oxford Reference. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 2020-02-15.
  6. ^ Bojtár, Endre (1999). Foreword to the Past: A Cultural History of the Baltic People. CEU Press. p. 140. ISBN 963-9116-42-4.
  7. ^ "Priory". All Web Hunt. Archived from the original on June 28, 2013. Retrieved July 1, 2013.
  8. ^ Michael Jones (4 August 2016). 24 Hours at Agincourt: 25 October 1415. Ebury Publishing. p. 315. ISBN 978-0-7535-5546-0.
  9. ^ David Charles Douglas (1969). English historical documents. 4. [Late medieval]. 1327 - 1485. Psychology Press. p. 214. ISBN 978-0-415-60467-3.
  10. ^ "p001-004 Lex Scripta, 1819". www.isle-of-man.com.
  11. ^ a b "Huitzilíhuitl, "Pluma de colibrí" (1396-1417)" [Huitzilíhuitl, “Hummingbird Feather” (1396-1417)]. Archeologia Mexicana (in Spanish). Retrieved June 3, 2019.
  12. ^ Josiah Clement Wedgwood; Anne Holt (1936). History of Parliament...: 1439-1509. H.M. Stationery Office. pp. 149–.
  13. ^ "Richard, 3rd duke of York | English noble". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 29 September 2018.
  14. ^ "Saint Catherine of Bologna | Italian mystic". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  15. ^ "Francis I | duke of Brittany". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  16. ^ "Sixtus IV | pope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  17. ^ James G. Wood (1910). The Lordship, Castle & Town of Chepstow, Otherwise Striguil. Mullock. p. 31.
  18. ^ "Paul II | pope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  19. ^ Phillip H. Stump (1994). “The” Reforms of the Council of Constance: (1414 - 1418). BRILL. pp. 14–. ISBN 90-04-09930-1.
  20. ^ Sir Nicholas Harris Nicolas (1842). History of the Orders of Knighthood of the British Empire; of the Order of the Guelphs of Hanover; and of the Medals, Clasps, and Crosses, Conferred for Naval and Military Services. J. Hunter. pp. 384–.
  21. ^ "Alexander (V) | antipope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 22 July 2018.
  22. ^ Edward A. Thomas (1888). Comprehensive Dictionary of Biography: Containing Succinct Accounts of the Most Eminent Persons in All Ages, Countries, and Professions. Porter & Coates. p. 379.
  23. ^ Barsoum, Ephrem (2003). The Scattered Pearls: A History of Syriac Literature and Sciences. Translated by Matti Moosa (2nd ed.). Gorgias Press. p. 495.
  24. ^ Michael Linkletter; Diana Luft (31 January 2007). Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium. Harvard University Press. p. 47. ISBN 978-0-674-02384-0.
  25. ^ "Ferdinand I | king of Aragon". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 31 March 2019.
  26. ^ The Genealogist. The Association. 1994. p. 81.
  27. ^ Ludwig Freiherr von Pastor (1891). The History of the Popes, from the Close of the Middle Ages: Drawn from the Secret Archives of the Vatican and Other Original Sources. J. Hodges. p. 202.
  28. ^ E H. Thompson (1890). From the Thames to the Trosachs: Impressions of Travel in England and Scotland. Cranston and Stowe. p. 14.