List of highest points reached in the Tour de France

View from an asphalt road up to a pointed dark grey mountain peak with a surrounding road
The highest point of elevation ever reached in the Tour de France is 2,802 m (9,193 ft) at the Cime de la Bonette loop road in the Alps (as of 2019), seen here from the northern ascent of the Col de la Bonette mountain pass.

The Tour de France is an annual men's multiple stage bicycle race primarily held in France, generally considered the most famous bicycle race in the world.[1] It was founded by the French sports journalist and former professional road racing cyclist Henri Desgrange, who became the first director of the race.[2] He was passionate about taking the Tour up to the highest reachable points of elevation in the Alps and Pyrenees using the most difficult routes.[3]

The highest point of the first Tour de France in 1903 was the summit of the 1,161 m (3,809 ft)-high Col de la République mountain pass in the Mont Pilat area of the Massif Central highland region. The following year the route remained identical, but in 1905 and 1906 the Tour moved into the Alps, in particular the Dauphiné Alps, and up to the Col Bayard at 1,264 m (4,147 ft). The 1907 Tour took the race higher, up to 1,326 m (4,350 ft) with the Col de Porte in the Chartreuse Mountains. This point was again the highest for the next two Tours.[4]

The race first reached high altitude[a] on the ninth edition in 1910 when it passed the 2,115 m (6,939 ft)-high Col du Tourmalet in the Pyrenees.[6][7] Not satisfied with that height, Desgrange the following year introduced his favoured Col du Galibier in the Alps, which summited at 2,556 m (8,386 ft) via a single-laned 365 m (1,198 ft)-long tunnel that first opened in 1891.[8][3] At the time, Desgrange eulogised over the Galibier in comparison to the Tourmalet and other climbs, saying: "Oh Sappey, oh Laffrey, oh Bayard, oh Tourmalet! I will not shirk from my duty in proclaiming that compared to the Galibier you are no more than pale and vulgar babies; faced with this giant we can do no more than tips our hats and bow!"[9] The Galibier was the highest point of elevation in each Tour to 1937, which led it to become one of the most iconic climbs in the race.[10] The 1938 race went higher up to the Alpine Col de l'Iseran at 2,770 m (9,088 ft).[6][11] Various Alpine passes, including the Galibier, were the highest points reached in Tours until the 1962 race saw a new high of 2,802 m (9,193 ft) at the Cime de la Bonette in the Alps, a short loop road which forks from the summit of the Col de la Bonette.[12] As of 2019, this remains the highest point of elevation reached by the Tour de France. Since 1962, all the highest points of Tours bar one have remained above 2,000 m (6,562 ft), using passes in the high Alps and Pyrenees.

ListEdit

Key
* Point was also used as the location of the stage finish
~ Climb was used for the first time in Tour de France history
^ Point was a new highest elevation reached in all Tour editions up to then
List of highest points reached in the Tour de France
Year Stage Climb Elevation[b][4] Mountain range Coordinates Category[c] First cyclist to summit Ref
1903 2 Col de la République ~ 1,161 m (3,809 ft) ^ Mont Pilat 45°19′58″N 4°28′49″E / 45.33278°N 4.48028°E / 45.33278; 4.48028 (Col de la République) N/A   Hippolyte Aucouturier (FRA) [4][14]
1904 2 Col de la République 1,161 m (3,809 ft) Mont Pilat 45°19′58″N 4°28′49″E / 45.33278°N 4.48028°E / 45.33278; 4.48028 (Col de la République) N/A   Antoine Fauré (FRA) [4][15]
1905 4 Col Bayard ~ 1,264 m (4,147 ft) ^ Dauphiné Alps 44°36′45″N 6°4′52″E / 44.61250°N 6.08111°E / 44.61250; 6.08111 (Col Bayard) N/A   Julien Maitron (FRA) [4][16]
1906 5 Col Bayard 1,264 m (4,147 ft) Dauphiné Alps 44°36′45″N 6°4′52″E / 44.61250°N 6.08111°E / 44.61250; 6.08111 (Col Bayard) N/A   René Pottier (FRA) [4][17]
1907 5 Col de Porte ~ 1,326 m (4,350 ft) ^ Chartreuse 45°17′24″N 5°46′1″E / 45.29000°N 5.76694°E / 45.29000; 5.76694 (Col de Porte) N/A   Émile Georget (FRA) [4][18]
1908 5 Col de Porte 1,326 m (4,350 ft) Chartreuse 45°17′24″N 5°46′1″E / 45.29000°N 5.76694°E / 45.29000; 5.76694 (Col de Porte) N/A   Georges Passerieu (FRA) [4][19]
1909 5 Col de Porte 1,326 m (4,350 ft) Chartreuse 45°17′24″N 5°46′1″E / 45.29000°N 5.76694°E / 45.29000; 5.76694 (Col de Porte) N/A   François Faber (LUX) [4][20]
1910 10 Col du Tourmalet ~ 2,115 m (6,939 ft) ^ Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) N/A   Octave Lapize (FRA) [6][21]
1911 5 Col du Galibier ~ 2,556 m (8,386 ft) ^ Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Émile Georget (FRA) [6][22]
1912 5 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Eugène Christophe (FRA) [6][23]
1913 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Marcel Buysse (BEL) [6][24]
1914 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Henri Pélissier (FRA) [6][25]
1915–
1918
Not held during World War I
1919 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Honoré Barthélémy (FRA) [6][26]
1920 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Firmin Lambot (BEL) [6][27]
1921 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Honoré Barthélémy (FRA) [6][28]
1922 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Émile Masson (BEL) [6][29]
1923 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Henri Pélissier (FRA) [30][31]
1924 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Bartolomeo Aimo (ITA) [6][32]
1925 14 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Lucien Buysse (BEL) [6][33]
1926 15 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Omer Huyse (BEL) [6][34]
1927 17 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Antonin Magne (FRA) [6][35]
1928 14 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Auguste Verdyck (BEL) [6][36]
1929 15 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Gaston Rebry (BEL) [6]
1930 16 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Pierre Magne (FRA) [37][38]
1931 17 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Jef Demuysere (BEL) [39][40]
1932 13 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Francesco Camusso (ITA) [41][42]
1933 7 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Vicente Trueba (ESP) [43][44]
1934 7 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Fédérico Ezquerra (ESP) [6][45]
1935 7 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Gabriel Ruozzi (FRA) [46][47]
1936 7 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Fédérico Ezquerra (ESP) [48][49]
1937 7 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) N/A   Gino Bartali (ITA) [50][51]
1938 15 Col de l'Iseran ~ 2,770 m (9,088 ft) ^ Graian Alps 45°25′1″N 7°1′51″E / 45.41694°N 7.03083°E / 45.41694; 7.03083 (Col de l'Iseran) N/A   Félicien Vervaecke (BEL) [52][53]
1939 16b Col de l'Iseran 2,770 m (9,088 ft) Graian Alps 45°25′1″N 7°1′51″E / 45.41694°N 7.03083°E / 45.41694; 7.03083 (Col de l'Iseran) N/A   Sylvère Maes (BEL) [54][55]
1940–
1946
Not held during World War II
1947 8 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Fermo Camellini (ITA) [56][57]
1948 14 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 2   Lucien Teisseire (FRA) [58][59]
1949 17 Col de l'Iseran 2,770 m (9,088 ft) Graian Alps 45°25′1″N 7°1′51″E / 45.41694°N 7.03083°E / 45.41694; 7.03083 (Col de l'Iseran) 1   Giuseppe Tacca (FRA) [60][61]
1950 18 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft) Cottian Alps 44°49′12″N 6°44′7″E / 44.82000°N 6.73528°E / 44.82000; 6.73528 (Col d'Izoard) 1   Louison Bobet (FRA) [62][63]
1951 20 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft) Cottian Alps 44°49′12″N 6°44′7″E / 44.82000°N 6.73528°E / 44.82000; 6.73528 (Col d'Izoard) 1   Fausto Coppi (ITA) [64][65]
1952 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Fausto Coppi (ITA) [66][67]
1953 18 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft) Cottian Alps 44°49′12″N 6°44′7″E / 44.82000°N 6.73528°E / 44.82000; 6.73528 (Col d'Izoard) 1   Louison Bobet (FRA) [68][69]
1954 19 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Federico Bahamontes (ESP) [70][71]
1955 8 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Charly Gaul (LUX) [72][73]
1956 17 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft) Cottian Alps 44°49′12″N 6°44′7″E / 44.82000°N 6.73528°E / 44.82000; 6.73528 (Col d'Izoard) 1   Valentin Huot (FRA) [74][75]
1957 10 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Marcel Janssens (BEL) [76][77]
1958 20 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft) Cottian Alps 44°49′12″N 6°44′7″E / 44.82000°N 6.73528°E / 44.82000; 6.73528 (Col d'Izoard) 1   Federico Bahamontes (ESP) [78][79]
1959 18 Col de l'Iseran 2,770 m (9,088 ft) Graian Alps 45°25′1″N 7°1′51″E / 45.41694°N 7.03083°E / 45.41694; 7.03083 (Col de l'Iseran) 1   Adolf Christian (AUT) [80][81]
1960 16 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft) Cottian Alps 44°49′12″N 6°44′7″E / 44.82000°N 6.73528°E / 44.82000; 6.73528 (Col d'Izoard) 1   Imerio Massignan (ITA) [82][83]
1961 17 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) 1   Marcel Queheille (FRA) [84][85]
1962 18 Cime de la Bonette ~ 2,802 m (9,193 ft) ^ Maritime Alps 44°19′18″N 6°48′25″E / 44.32167°N 6.80694°E / 44.32167; 6.80694 (Cime de la Bonette) 1   Federico Bahamontes (ESP) [86][87]
1963 16 Col de l'Iseran 2,770 m (9,088 ft) Graian Alps 45°25′1″N 7°1′51″E / 45.41694°N 7.03083°E / 45.41694; 7.03083 (Col de l'Iseran) 1   Fernando Manzaneque (ESP) [88][89]
1964 9 Cime de la Bonette 2,802 m (9,193 ft) Maritime Alps 44°19′18″N 6°48′25″E / 44.32167°N 6.80694°E / 44.32167; 6.80694 (Cime de la Bonette) 1   Federico Bahamontes (ESP) [90][91]
1965 16 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft) Cottian Alps 44°49′12″N 6°44′7″E / 44.82000°N 6.73528°E / 44.82000; 6.73528 (Col d'Izoard) 1   Joaquim Galera (ESP) [92][93]
1966 16 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Julio Jiménez (ESP) [94][95]
1967 10 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Julio Jiménez (ESP) [96][97]
1968 13 Port d'Envalira 2,407 m (7,897 ft) Pyrenees 42°32′24″N 1°43′10″E / 42.54000°N 1.71944°E / 42.54000; 1.71944 (Port d'Envalira) 1   Aurelio González Puente (ESP) [98][99]
1969 10 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Eddy Merckx (BEL) [100][101]
1970 19 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) 1   Andrés Gandarias (ESP) [102][103]
1971 16b Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) 1   Lucien Van Impe (BEL) [104][105]
1972 14a Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Joop Zoetemelk (NED) [106][107]
1973 8 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Luis Ocaña (ESP) [108][109]
1974 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) 1   Vicente López Carril (ESP) [110][111]
1975 16 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft) Cottian Alps 44°49′12″N 6°44′7″E / 44.82000°N 6.73528°E / 44.82000; 6.73528 (Col d'Izoard) 1   Bernard Thévenet (FRA) [112][113]
1976 15 Col du Tourmalet[d] 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) 1   Francisco Galdós (ESP) [114][116]
1977 2 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) 1   Lucien Van Impe (BEL) [117][118]
1978 11 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) 1   Michel Pollentier (BEL) [119][120]
1979 17 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Lucien Van Impe (BEL) [121][122]
1980 17 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Johan De Muynck (BEL) [123][124]
1981 19 Col de la Madeleine 2,000 m (6,562 ft) Graian Alps 45°26′5″N 6°22′32″E / 45.43472°N 6.37556°E / 45.43472; 6.37556 (Col de la Madeleine) 1   Lucien Van Impe (BEL) [125][11]
1982 16 * Alpe d'Huez 1,850 m (6,070 ft) Western Alps 45°3′37″N 6°4′17″E / 45.06028°N 6.07139°E / 45.06028; 6.07139 (Alpe d'Huez) HC   Beat Breu (SUI) [126][127]
1983 10 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) HC   José Patrocinio Jiménez (COL) [128][129]
1984 18 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Francisco Rodríguez Maldonado (COL) [130][131]
1985 17 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) HC   Pello Ruiz Cabestany (ESP) [132][133]
1986 18 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Luis Herrera (COL) [134][135]
1987 21 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Federico Muñoz (ESP) [136][137]
1988 15 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) HC   Laudelino Cubino (ESP) [138][139]
1989 17 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Gert-Jan Theunisse (NED) [140][141]
1990 16 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) HC   Miguel Ángel Martínez Torres (ESP) [142][143]
1991 13 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) HC   Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) [144][145]
1992 13 Col de l'Iseran 2,770 m (9,088 ft) Graian Alps 45°25′1″N 7°1′51″E / 45.41694°N 7.03083°E / 45.41694; 7.03083 (Col de l'Iseran) HC   Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) [146][147]
1993 11 Cime de la Bonette 2,802 m (9,193 ft) Maritime Alps 44°19′18″N 6°48′25″E / 44.32167°N 6.80694°E / 44.32167; 6.80694 (Cime de la Bonette) HC   Robert Millar (GBR) [148][149]
1994 17 * Val Thorens ~ 2,275 m (7,464 ft) Graian Alps 45°17′53″N 6°34′48″E / 45.29806°N 6.58000°E / 45.29806; 6.58000 (Val Thorens) HC   Nelson Rodríguez Serna (COL) [150][151]
1995 15 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) HC   Richard Virenque (FRA) [152][153]
1996 9 * Sestriere[e] 2,035 m (6,677 ft) Cottian Alps 44°57′N 6°53′E / 44.950°N 6.883°E / 44.950; 6.883 1   Bjarne Riis (DEN) [154][155]
1997 10 & 11 Port d'Envalira 2,407 m (7,897 ft) Pyrenees 42°32′24″N 1°43′10″E / 42.54000°N 1.71944°E / 42.54000; 1.71944 (Port d'Envalira) HC   Richard Virenque (FRA) [156][157][158]
1998 15 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Marco Pantani (ITA) [159][160]
1999 9 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   José Luis Arrieta (ESP) [161][162]
2000 15 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Pascal Hervé (FRA) [163][164]
2001 14 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) HC   Sven Montgomery (SUI) [165][166]
2002 16 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Santiago Botero (COL) [167][168]
2003 8 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Stefano Garzelli (ITA) [169][170]
2004 17 Col de la Madeleine 2,000 m (6,562 ft) Graian Alps 45°26′5″N 6°22′32″E / 45.43472°N 6.37556°E / 45.43472; 6.37556 (Col de la Madeleine) HC   Gilberto Simoni (ITA) [171][172]
2005 11 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Alexander Vinokourov (KAZ) [173][174]
2006 16 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Michael Rasmussen (DEN) [175][176]
2007 9 Col de l'Iseran 2,770 m (9,088 ft) Graian Alps 45°25′1″N 7°1′51″E / 45.41694°N 7.03083°E / 45.41694; 7.03083 (Col de l'Iseran) HC   Yaroslav Popovych (UKR) [177][178]
2008 16 Cime de la Bonette 2,802 m (9,193 ft) Maritime Alps 44°19′18″N 6°48′25″E / 44.32167°N 6.80694°E / 44.32167; 6.80694 (Cime de la Bonette) HC   John-Lee Augustyn (RSA) [179][180]
2009 16 Col du Grand Saint-Bernard 2,470 m (8,104 ft) Pennine Alps 45°52′08″N 7°10′14″E / 45.86889°N 7.17056°E / 45.86889; 7.17056 (Great St Bernard Pass) HC   Franco Pellizotti (ITA)[f] [182][183]
2010 17 * Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) HC   Andy Schleck (LUX) [184][185]
2011 18 Col Agnel 2,744 m (9,003 ft) Cottian Alps 44°41′2″N 6°58′46″E / 44.68389°N 6.97944°E / 44.68389; 6.97944 (Col Agnel) HC   Maxim Iglinsky (KAZ) [186][187]
2012 16 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Pyrenees 42°54′29″N 0°8′42″E / 42.90806°N 0.14500°E / 42.90806; 0.14500 (Col du Tourmalet) HC   Thomas Voeckler (FRA) [188][189]
2013 8 Port de Pailhères 2,001 m (6,565 ft) Pyrenees 42°44′0″N 1°59′33″E / 42.73333°N 1.99250°E / 42.73333; 1.99250 HC   Nairo Quintana (COL) [190][191]
2014 14 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft) Cottian Alps 44°49′12″N 6°44′7″E / 44.82000°N 6.73528°E / 44.82000; 6.73528 (Col d'Izoard) HC   Joaquim Rodríguez (ESP) [192][193]
2015 17 Col d'Allos[g] 2,250 m (7,382 ft) Southern Alps 44°17′50″N 6°35′39″E / 44.29722°N 6.59417°E / 44.29722; 6.59417 (Col d'Allos) 1   Simon Geschke (GER) [194][195]
2016 10 Port d'Envalira 2,407 m (7,897 ft) Pyrenees 42°32′24″N 1°43′10″E / 42.54000°N 1.71944°E / 42.54000; 1.71944 (Port d'Envalira) 1   Rui Costa (POR) [196][197]
2017 17 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Dauphiné Alps 45°3′50″N 6°24′28″E / 45.06389°N 6.40778°E / 45.06389; 6.40778 (Col du Galibier) HC   Primož Roglič (SLO) [198][199]
2018 17 * Col de Portet ~ 2,215 m (7,267 ft) Pyrenees 42°49′59″N 0°14′12″E / 42.83306°N 0.23667°E / 42.83306; 0.23667 (Col de Portet) HC   Nairo Quintana (COL) [200][201]
2019 19 *[h] Col de l'Iseran 2,770 m (9,088 ft) Graian Alps 45°25′1″N 7°1′51″E / 45.41694°N 7.03083°E / 45.41694; 7.03083 (Col de l'Iseran) HC   Egan Bernal (COL)[h] [203][204]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Altitudes beyond around 2,100 m (6,890 ft) above sea level (high altitude) affect the human body by limiting the amount of oxygen one is able to produce, which is detrimental to a cyclist's performance.[5]
  2. ^ The elevation points are taken at the passed summit.
  3. ^ The "Category" column refers to the system used for the mountains classification in the Tour de France to determine each climb's difficulty. It began in the 1947 Tour with two categories named 1 and 2 (or A and B). A third category was added in 1949 and a fourth in 1962. A special hors catégorie (HC) was introduced in 1979, given to the most difficult climbs designated as "beyond categorization".[13]
  4. ^ Before the 1976 Tour de France, the Galibier was stated by the media to be the highest climb of the route but it was closed earlier in the year for repairs to the summit tunnel.[114][115]
  5. ^ Two higher planned climbs were both cancelled because of bad weather, the Col du Galibier at 2,642 m (8,668 ft), and the Col de l'Iseran at 2,770 m (9,088 ft).[154]
  6. ^ In March 2011, all of Italian Franco Pellizotti's results since 7 May 2009 were disqualified after the Court of Arbitration for Sport found his biological passport indicated irregular values.[181]
  7. ^ The Col du Galibier was planned to be the highest point of elevation on the 2015 Tour de France, but landslides prior to the race forced its cancellation.[194]
  8. ^ a b Stage 19 of the 2019 Tour de France was stopped atop the Col de l'Iseran after hailstorms and mudslides made the road impracticable near Val-d'Isère, before the planned final climb and finish at Tignes. The stage victory was not awarded.[202]

ReferencesEdit

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  3. ^ a b Friebe & Goding 2017, p. 191.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i Augendre 2019, pp. 181–199.
  5. ^ Hoffman 2014, p. 382.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Cossins 2013, pp. 50–51.
  7. ^ Augendre 2019, p. 194.
  8. ^ Augendre 2019, p. 183.
  9. ^ Friebe & Goding 2017, p. 192.
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  14. ^ Cossins 2017, pp. 149–151.
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  45. ^ "El éxito de los ciclistas españoles se acrecienta, especialmente el de Ezquerra que es "leader" del G. P. de la Montaña..." [The success of Spanish cyclists increases, especially that of Ezquerra who is the "leader" of G. P. de la Montaña...] (PDF). El Mundo Deportivo (in Spanish). 1 July 1934. p. 1.
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