Julio Jiménez (cyclist)

Julio Jiménez Muñoz (born 28 October 1934) is a Spanish former professional road racing cyclist. Known as a climbing specialist, he won the King of the Mountains title six times at Grand Tours. Stage 20 of the 1964 Tour de France was one of the most famous stages in TDF history due to the battle up the Puy de Dome between Anquetil and Poulidor. This stage was won by Jimenez, who was able to cross the line 0:11 ahead of Spanish climber Federico Bahamontes, 0:57 ahead of Poulidor, 1:30 ahead of Vittorio Adorni and 1:39 ahead of Anquetil.[2] In 1965, he became one of (now) four riders to complete the Tour/Vuelta double by winning both Tour's mountains competition in the same year.

Julio Jiménez
Julio Jiménez 1969 Ajman stamp.jpg
Jiménez on a 1969 UAE stamp
Personal information
Full nameJulio Jiménez Muñoz
NicknameLa pulga de Ávila (The Flea of Avila), The Watchmaker of Avila[1]
Born28 October 1934 (1934-10-28) (age 85)
Ávila, Spain
Team information
Current teamRetired
DisciplineRoad
RoleRider
Rider typeClimber
Professional teams
1959Bilbao-Goyoaga
1960–1961Catigene
1962–1963Faema
1964–1965KAS-Kaskol
1966Ford France-Geminiani
1966KAS-Kaskol
1967–1968Bic
1969Eliolona
Major wins
Spain National Road Race Champion
Giro d'Italia, 4 stages
Tour de France, 5 stages
King of the Mountains, 3 times

Vuelta a España, 3 stages

King of the Mountains, 3 times

Major resultsEdit

1963
King of the Mountains – Vuelta a España
1964 – Kas-Kaskol
King of the Mountains – Vuelta a España
2 stages – Vuelta a España
Tour de France
2nd, King of the Mountains
7th, General Classification
2 stages
1965 – Kas-Kaskol
Tour de France
Winner Mountains classification
2 stages
King of the Mountains – Vuelta a España
1 stage – Vuelta a España
1966 – Ford-France-Hutchinson
Tour de France
Winner Mountains classification
1 stage
Giro d'Italia
2 stages
1967 – Spain
Tour de France
Winner Mountains classification
2nd overall
1968 – Spain
Giro d'Italia
2 stages
Tour de France
3rd, King of the Mountains
30th, General Classification

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Clarke, Stuart (5 November 2015). "13 of the strangest nicknames in cycling". Cycling Weekly. Retrieved 11 May 2016.
  2. ^ {{cite web|url=https://www.bikeraceinfo.com/tdf/tdf1964.html

External linksEdit