The high jump is a track and field event in which competitors must jump unaided over a horizontal bar placed at measured heights without dislodging it. In its modern, most-practiced format, a bar is placed between two standards with a crash mat for landing. Since ancient times, competitors have introduced increasingly effective techniques to arrive at the current form, and the current universally preferred method is the Fosbury Flop, in which athletes run towards the bar and leap head first with their back to the bar.

Athletics
High jump
Nicole Forrester.JPG
Canadian high jumper Nicole Forrester demonstrating the Fosbury flop
World records
MenCuba Javier Sotomayor 2.45 m (8 ft 14 in) (1993)
WomenBulgaria Stefka Kostadinova 2.09 m (6 ft 10+14 in) (1987)
Olympic records
MenUnited States Charles Austin 2.39 m (7 ft 10 in) (1996)
WomenRussia Yelena Slesarenko 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) (2004)
World Championship records
MenUkraine Bohdan Bondarenko 2.41 m (7 ft 10+34 in) (2013)
WomenBulgaria Stefka Kostadinova 2.09 m (6 ft 10+14 in) (1987)

The discipline is, alongside the pole vault, one of two vertical clearance events in the Olympic athletics program. It is contested at the World Championships in Athletics and the World Athletics Indoor Championships, and is a common occurrence at track and field meets. The high jump was among the first events deemed acceptable for women, having been held at the 1928 Olympic Games.

Javier Sotomayor (Cuba) is the current men's record holder with a jump of 2.45 m (8 ft 14 in) set in 1993 – the longest-standing record in the history of the men's high jump. Stefka Kostadinova (Bulgaria) has held the women's world record of 2.09 m (6 ft 10+14 in) since 1987, also the longest-held record in the event.

RulesEdit

 
Yelena Slesarenko hitting the bar while using the Fosbury Flop technique

The rules set for the high jump by World Athletics (previously named the IAAF[1]) are Technical Rules TR26 and TR27[2] (previously Rules 181 and 182[1]). Jumpers must take off from one foot. A jump is considered a failure if the jumper dislodges the bar, touches the ground, or breaks the plane of the near edge of the bar before clearance.

Competitors may begin jumping at any height announced by the chief judge, or may pass at their own discretion. Most competitions state that three consecutive missed jumps, at any height or combination of heights, will eliminate the jumper from contention. The victory goes to the jumper who clears the greatest height during the final.

Tie breakingEdit

If two or more jumpers tie for any place, the tie-breakers are: 1) the fewest misses at the height at which the tie occurred; and 2) the fewest misses throughout the competition. If the event remains tied for first place (or a limited-advancement position to a subsequent meet), the jumpers have a jump-off, beginning at the next height above their highest success. Jumpers have one attempt at each height. If only one succeeds, he or she wins; if more than one does, these try with the bar raised; if none does, all try with the bar lowered. This process was followed at the 2015 World Championship men's event.

Example jump-off
Competitor Main competition Jump-off Place
1.75m 1.80m 1.84m 1.88m 1.91m 1.94m 1.97m 1.91m 1.89m 1.91m
A o xo o xo x xx x o x 2
B xo xo - xxx x o o 1
C o xo xo xxx x x 3
D xo xo xo xxx 4

In the example jump-off above, the final cleared height is 1.88m, at which A B C and D each have one failure. D has two failures at lower heights compared to one each for the other three, who proceed to a jump-off at the next height above the final cleared height. C is eliminated in the second round of the jump-off 1.89m, then B wins in the third round.

A 2009 rule-change makes the jump-off optional, so that first place can be shared by agreement among tied athletes.[1] This rule led to shared gold in the 2020 Olympic men's event held in 2021.

HistoryEdit

 
Konstantinos Tsiklitiras during the standing high jump competition at the 1912 Summer Olympics

The first recorded high jump event took place in Scotland in the 19th century. Early jumpers used either an elaborate straight-on approach or a scissors technique. In later years, the bar was approached diagonally, and the jumper threw first the inside leg and then the other over the bar in a scissoring motion.

Around the turn of the 20th century, techniques began to change, beginning with the Irish-American Michael Sweeney's Eastern cut-off as a variation of the scissors technique. By taking off as in the scissors method, extending his spine and flattening out over the bar, Sweeney raised the world record to 1.97 m (6 ft 5+12 in) in 1895. Even in 1948, John Winter of Australia won the gold medal of the 1948 London Olympics with this style. Besides, one of the most successful female high jumper, Iolanda Balaș of Romania, used this style to dominate women's high jump for about 10 years until her retirement at 1967.

Another American, George Horine, developed an even more efficient technique, the Western roll. In this style, the bar again is approached on a diagonal, but the inner leg is used for the take-off, while the outer leg is thrust up to lead the body sideways over the bar. Horine increased the world standard to 2.01 m (6 ft 7 in) in 1912. His technique was predominant through the 1936 Berlin Olympics, in which the event was won by Cornelius Johnson at 2.03 m (6 ft 7+34 in).

American and Soviet jumpers were the most successful for the next four decades, and they pioneered the straddle technique. Straddle jumpers took off as in the Western roll but rotated their torso, belly-down, around the bar, obtaining the most efficient and highest clearance up to that time. Straddle jumper Charles Dumas was the first to clear 7ft (2.13m), in 1956. American John Thomas pushed the world mark to 2.23 m (7 ft 3+34 in) in 1960. Valeriy Brumel of the Soviet Union took over the event for the next four years, radically speeding up his approach run. He took the record up to 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) and won the gold medal of the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, before a motorcycle accident ended his career in 1965.

 
Gold medal winner Ethel Catherwood of Canada scissors over the bar at the 1928 Summer Olympics. Her winning result was 1.59 m (5 ft 2+12 in).
 
Platt Adams during the standing high jump competition at the 1912 Summer Olympics

American coaches, including two-time NCAA champion Frank Costello of the University of Maryland, flocked to Russia to learn from Brumel and his coaches like Vladimir Dyachkov. However, it would be a solitary innovator at Oregon State University, Dick Fosbury, who would bring the high jump into the next century.

Taking advantage of the raised, softer, artificially-cushioned landing areas that were in use by then, Fosbury added a new twist to the outmoded Eastern cut-off. He directed himself over the bar head and shoulders first, going over on his back and landing in a fashion that would likely have resulted in serious injury in the old ground-level landing pits, which were usually filled with sawdust or sand mixtures.

Since Fosbury used his new style, called the Fosbury Flop, to win the gold medal of the 1968 Mexico Olympics, it has spread quickly, and soon "floppers" were dominating international high jump competitions. The first flopper setting a world record was the American Dwight Stones, who cleared 2.30 m (7 ft 6+12 in) in 1973. In the female side, the 16-year-old flopper Ulrike Meyfarth from West Germany won the gold medal of the 1972 Munich Olympics at 1.92 m (6 ft 3+12 in), which tied the women's world record at that time (held by the Austrian straddler Ilona Gusenbauer a year before). However, it was not until 1978 when a flopper, Sara Simeoni of Italy, broke the women's world record.

Successful high jumpers following Fosbury's lead also included the rival of Dwight Stones, 1.73 metres (5 ft 8 in)-tall Franklin Jacobs of Paterson, New Jersey, who cleared 2.32 m (7 ft 7+14 in), 0.59 metres (1 ft 11 in) over his head (a feat equalled 27 years later by Stefan Holm of Sweden); Chinese record-setters Ni-chi Chin and Zhu Jianhua; Germans Gerd Wessig and Dietmar Mögenburg; Swedish Olympic medalist and former world record holder Patrik Sjöberg; female jumpers Ulrike Meyfarth of West Germany and Sara Simeoni of Italy.

In spite of this, the straddle technique did not disappear at once. In 1977, the 18-year-old Soviet straddler Vladimir Yashchenko set a new world record 2.33 m (7 ft 7+12 in). In 1978, he raised the record to 2.34 m (7 ft 8 in), and 2.35 m (7 ft 8+12 in) indoor, just before a knee injury ended his career effectively when he was only 20 years old. In the female side, the straddler Rosemarie Ackermann of East Germany, who was the first female jumper ever to clear 2 m (6 ft 6+12 in), raised the world record from 1.95 m (6 ft 4+34 in) to 2.00 m (6 ft 6+12 in) during 1974 to 1977. In fact, from 2 June 1977 to 3 August 1978, almost 10 years after Fosbury's success, the men's and women's world records were still held by straddle jumpers Yashchenko and Ackermann respectively. However, they were the last world record holders using the straddle technique. Ackermann also won the gold medal of the 1976 Montreal Olympics, which was the last time for a straddle jumper (male or female) to win an Olympic medal.

In 1980, the Polish flopper, 1976 Olympic gold medalist Jacek Wszoła, broke Yashchenko's world record at 2.35 m (7 ft 8+12 in). Two years before, the female Italian flopper Sara Simeoni, the long-term rival of Ackermann, broke Ackermann's world record at 2.01 m (6 ft 7 in) and became the first female flopper to break the women's world record. She also won the gold medal of the 1980 Moscow Olympics, where Ackermann placed fourth. Since then, the flop style has been completely dominant. All other techniques were almost extinct in serious high jump competitions after late 1980s.

Technical aspectsEdit

Technique and form have evolved greatly over the history of high jump. The Fosbury Flop is currently considered the most efficient way for competitors to propel themselves over the bar.

ApproachEdit

 
Spanish jumper Ruth Beitia approaching the bar from an angle

For a Fosbury Flop, depending on the athlete's jump foot, they start on the right or left of the high jump mat, placing their jump foot farthest away from the mat. They take an eight- to ten-step approach, with the first three to five steps being in a straight line and the last five being on a curve. Athletes generally mark their approach in order to find as much consistency as possible.

The approach run can be more important than the takeoff. If a high jumper runs with bad timing or without enough aggression, clearing the bar becomes more of a challenge. The approach requires a certain shape or curve, the right amount of speed, and the correct number of strides. The approach angle is also critical for optimal height.

The straight run builds the momentum and sets the tone for a jump. The athlete starts by pushing off their takeoff foot with slow, powerful steps, then begins to accelerate. They should be running upright by the end of the straight portion.

The athlete's takeoff foot will be landing on the first step of the curve, and they will continue to accelerate, focusing their body towards the opposite back corner of the high jump mat. While staying erect and leaning away from the mat, the athlete takes their final two steps flat-footed, rolling from the heel to the toe.

Most great straddle jumpers run at angles of about 30 to 40 degrees. The length of the run is determined by the speed of the approach. A slower run requires about eight strides, but a faster high jumper might need about 13 strides. Greater speed allows a greater part of the body's forward momentum to be converted upward.[3]

The J approach favored by Fosbury floppers allows for speed, the ability to turn in the air (centripetal force), and a good takeoff position, which helps turn horizontal momentum into vertical momentum. The approach should be a hard, controlled stride so that the athlete does not fall from running at an angle. Athletes should lean into the curve from their ankles, not their hips. This allows their hips to rotate during takeoff, which in turn allows their center of gravity to pass under the bar.[4]

TakeoffEdit

The takeoff can be double-arm or single-arm. In both cases, the plant foot should be the foot farthest from the bar, angled towards the opposite back corner of the mat, as they drive up the knee on their non-takeoff leg. This is accompanied by a one- or two-arm swing while driving the knee.

Unlike the straddle technique, where the takeoff foot is "planted" in the same spot regardless of the height of the bar, flop-style jumpers must adjust their approach run as the bar is raised so that their takeoff spot is slightly farther out from the bar. Jumpers attempting to reach record heights commonly fail when most of their energy is directed into the vertical effort and they knock the bar off the standards with the backs of their legs as they stall.

An effective approach shape can be derived from physics. For example, the rate of backward spin required as the jumper crosses the bar in order to facilitate shoulder clearance on the way up and foot clearance on the way down can be determined by computer simulation. This rotation rate can be back-calculated to determine the required angle of lean away from the bar at the moment of planting, based on how long the jumper is on the takeoff foot. This information, together with the jumper's speed, can be used to calculate the radius of the curved part of the approach. One can also work in the opposite direction by assuming a certain approach radius and determining the resulting backward rotation.

Drills can be practiced to solidify the approach. One drill is to run in a straight line and then run two to three circles spiraling into one another. Another is to run or skip a circle of any size two to three times in a row.[5] It is important to leap upwards without first leaning into the bar, allowing the momentum of the J approach to carry the body across the bar.

FlightEdit

The knee on the athlete's non-takeoff leg naturally turns their body, placing them in the air with their back to the bar. The athlete then drives their shoulders towards the back of their feet, arching their body over the bar. They can look over their shoulder to judge when to kick both feet over their head, causing their body to clear the bar and land on the mat.[6]

All-time top 25Edit

Men (outdoor)Edit

Ath.# Perf.# Mark Athlete Nation Date Place Ref
1 1 2.45 m (8 ft 14 in) Javier Sotomayor   Cuba 27 JUL 1993 Salamanca
2 2.44 m (8 ft 0 in) Sotomayor #2 29 JUL 1989 San Juan
3 2.43 m (7 ft 11+12 in) Sotomayor #3 08 SEP 1988 Salamanca
2 3 2.43 m (7 ft 11+12 in) Mutaz Essa Barshim   Qatar 05 SEP 2014 Brussels [11]
3 5 2.42 m (7 ft 11+14 in) Patrik Sjöberg   Sweden 30 JUN 1987 Stockholm
5 2.42 m (7 ft 11+14 in) Sotomayor #4 05 JUN 1994 Seville
3 5 2.42 m (7 ft 11+14 in) Bohdan Bondarenko   Ukraine 14 JUN 2014 New York City [12]
5 2.42 m (7 ft 11+14 in) Barshim #2 14 JUN 2014 New York City [12]
5 9 2.41 m (7 ft 10+34 in) Igor Paklin   Soviet Union 04 SEP 1985 Kobe
9 2.41 m (7 ft 10+34 in) Sotomayor #5 25 JUN 1994 Havana
Sotomayor #6 15 JUL 1994 London
Bondarenko #2 04 JUL 2013 Lausanne
Bondarenko #3 15 AUG 2013 Moscow
Barshim #3 05 JUN 2014 Rome
Barshim #4 22 AUG 2014 Eberstadt
Barshim #5 30 MAY 2015 Eugene
6 17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Rudolf Povarnitsyn   Soviet Union 11 AUG 1985 Donetsk
17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Sotomayor #7 12 MAR 1989 Havana
Sjöberg #2 05 AUG 1989 Brussels
17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) A Sotomayor #8 13 AUG 1989 Bogotá
6 17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Sorin Matei   Romania 20 JUN 1990 Bratislava
17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Sotomayor #9 19 JUL 1991 Paris
6 17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Charles Austin   United States 07 AUG 1991 Zürich
17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Sotomayor #10 22 MAY 1993 Havana
Sotomayor #11 23 JUL 1993 London
Sotomayor #12 22 AUG 1993 Stuttgart
Sotomayor #13 10 JUL 1994 Eberstadt
Sotomayor #14 18 JUL 1994 Nice
Sotomayor #15 29 JUL 1994 St. Petersburg
Sotomayor #16 11 SEP 1994 London
Sotomayor #17 25 MAR 1995 Mar del Plata
6 17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Vyacheslav Voronin   Russia 05 AUG 2000 London
17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Barshim #6 01 JUN 2013 Eugene
6 17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Derek Drouin   Canada 25 APR 2014 Des Moines
17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Bondarenko #4 11 MAY 2014 Tokyo
Bondarenko #5 03 JUL 2014 Lausanne [13]
6 17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Andriy Protsenko   Ukraine 03 JUL 2014 Lausanne [13]
17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Bondarenko #6 18 JUL 2014 Monaco
Bondarenko #7 05 SEP 2014 Brussels [11]
Barshim #7 11 JUN 2016 Opole
Barshim #8 20 AUG 2017 Birmingham
Barshim #9 27 AUG 2017 Eberstadt
Barshim #10 04 MAY 2018 Doha
Barshim #11 02 JUL 2018 Székesfehérvár
6 17 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Danil Lysenko   Authorised Neutral Athletes 20 JUL 2018 Monaco [14]
13 2.39 m (7 ft 10 in) Zhu Jianhua   China 10 JUN 1984 Eberstadt
Hollis Conway   United States 30 JUL 1989 Norman
Ivan Ukhov   Russia 05 JUL 2012 Cheboksary
Gianmarco Tamberi   Italy 15 JUL 2016 Monaco [15]
17 2.38 m (7 ft 9+12 in) Hennadiy Avdyeyenko   Soviet Union 06 SEP 1987 Rome
Sergey Malchenko   Soviet Union 04 SEP 1988 Banská Bystrica
Dragutin Topić   FR Yugoslavia 01 AUG 1993 Belgrade
Troy Kemp   Bahamas 12 JUL 1995 Nice
Artur Partyka   Poland 18 AUG 1996 Eberstadt
Jacques Freitag   South Africa 05 MAR 2005 Oudtshoorn
Andriy Sokolovskyy   Ukraine 08 JUL 2005 Rome
Andrey Silnov   Russia 25 JUL 2008 London
Zhang Guowei   China 30 MAY 2015 Eugene

Annulled marksEdit

  • Ivan Ukhov jumped 2.41 in Doha on 10 May 2014. This performance was annulled due to doping offences.

Women (outdoor)Edit

Ath.# Perf.# Mark Athlete Nation Date Place Ref
1 1 2.09 m (6 ft 10+14 in) Stefka Kostadinova   Bulgaria 30 AUG 1987 Rome
2 2.08 m (6 ft 9+34 in) Kostadinova #2 31 MAY 1986 Sofia
2 2 2.08 m (6 ft 9+34 in) Blanka Vlašić   Croatia 31 AUG 2009 Zagreb
3 4 2.07 m (6 ft 9+14 in) Lyudmila Andonova   Bulgaria 20 JUL 1984 Berlin
4 2.07 m (6 ft 9+14 in) Kostadinova #3 25 MAY 1986 Sofia
Kostadinova #4 16 SEP 1987 Cagliari
Kostadinova #5 03 SEP 1988 Sofia
Vlašić #2 07 AUG 2007 Stockholm
3 4 2.07 m (6 ft 9+14 in) Anna Chicherova   Russia 22 JUL 2011 Cheboksary
10 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Kostadinova #6 18 AUG 1985 Moscow
Kostadinova #7 15 JUN 1986 Fürth
Kostadinova #8 14 SEP 1986 Cagliari
Kostadinova #9 06 JUN 1987 Worrstadt
Kostadinova #10 08 SEP 1987 Rieti
5 10 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Kajsa Bergqvist   Sweden 26 JUL 2003 Eberstadt
Hestrie Cloete   South Africa 31 AUG 2003 Paris
Yelena Slesarenko   Russia 28 AUG 2004 Athens
10 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Vlašić #3 30 JUL 2007 Thessaloniki
Vlašić #4 22 JUN 2008 Istanbul
Vlašić #5 05 JUL 2008 Madrid
5 10 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Ariane Friedrich   Germany 14 JUN 2009 Berlin
Mariya Lasitskene   Authorised Neutral Athletes 06 JUL 2017 Lausanne [16]
10 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Lasitskene #2 20 JUN 2019 Ostrava [17]
10 24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Tamara Bykova   Soviet Union 22 JUN 1984 Kyiv
24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Kostadinova #11 14 JUN 1986 Worrstadt
Kostadinova #12 07 SEP 1986 Rieti
Kostadinova #13 04 JUL 1987 Oslo
Kostadinova #14 13 SEP 1987 Padova
Kostadinova #15 12 AUG 1988 Budapest
10 24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Heike Henkel   Germany 31 AUG 1991 Tokyo
24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Kostadinova #16 04 JUL 1992 San Marino
Kostadinova #17 18 SEP 1993 Fukuoka
10 24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Inha Babakova   Ukraine 15 SEP 1995 Tokyo
24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Kostadinova #18 03 AUG 1996 Atlanta
Bergqvist #2 18 AUG 2002 Poznan
Cloete #2 10 AUG 2003 Berlin
Bergqvist #3 28 JUL 2006 London
Vlašić #6 21 JUL 2007 Madrid
Vlašić #7 02 SEP 2007 Osaka
Vlašić #8 12 JUN 2008 Ostrava
Vlašić #9 01 JUL 2008 Bydgoszcz
10 24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Tia Hellebaut   Belgium 23 AUG 2008 Beijing
24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Vlašić #10 23 AUG 2008 Beijing
Vlašić #11 08 MAY 2009 Doha
10 24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Chaunté Lowe   United States 26 JUN 2010 Des Moines
24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Vlašić #12 05 SEP 2010 Split
Chicherova #2 16 SEP 2011 Brussels
Chicherova #3 11 AUG 2012 London
Lasitskene #3 21 JUL 2017 Monaco
Lasitskene #4 08 SEPT 2021 Zürich [18]
10 24 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in) Yaroslava Mahuchikh   Ukraine 02 SEP 2022 Brussels [19]
16 2.04 m (6 ft 8+14 in) Silvia Costa   Cuba 09 SEP 1989 Barcelona
Venelina Veneva-Mateeva   Bulgaria 02 JUN 2001 Kalamata
Irina Gordeeva   Russia 19 AUG 2012 Eberstadt
Brigetta Barrett   United States 22 JUN 2013 Des Moines
20 2.03 m (6 ft 7+34 in) Ulrike Meyfarth   West Germany 21 AUG 1983 London
Louise Ritter   United States 08 JUL 1988 Austin
Tatyana Motkova   Russia 30 MAY 1995 Bratislava
Niki Bakoyianni   Greece 03 AUG 1996 Atlanta
Antonietta Di Martino   Italy 24 JUN 2007 Milan
25 2.02 m (6 ft 7+12 in) Yelena Yelesina   Soviet Union 23 JUL 1990 Seattle
Monica Iagar   Romania 06 JUN 1998 Budapest
Marina Kuptsova   Russia 01 JUN 2003 Hengelo
Vita Styopina   Ukraine 28 AUG 2004 Athens
Ruth Beitia   Spain 04 AUG 2007 San Sebastián
Elena Vallortigara   Italy 22 JUL 2018 London
Nafissatou Thiam   Belgium 22 JUN 2019 Talence
Yuliya Levchenko   Ukraine 10 SEP 2019 Minsk
Vashti Cunningham   United States 29 MAY 2021 Chula Vista
Nicola McDermott   Australia 07 AUG 2021 Tokyo [20]
Eleanor Patterson   Australia 19 JUL 2022 Eugene [21]

Men (indoor)Edit

Rank Mark Athlete Date Place Ref
1 2.43 m (7 ft 11+12 in)   Javier Sotomayor (CUB) 4 March 1989 Budapest
2 2.42 m (7 ft 11+14 in)   Carlo Thränhardt (FRG) 26 February 1988 Berlin
3 2.41 m (7 ft 10+34 in)   Patrik Sjöberg (SWE) 1 February 1987 Piraeus
  Mutaz Essa Barshim (QAT) 18 February 2015 Athlone
5 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in)   Hollis Conway (USA) 10 March 1991 Seville
  Stefan Holm (SWE) 6 March 2005 Madrid
  Ivan Ukhov (RUS) 25 February 2009 Piraeus
  Aleksey Dmitrik (RUS) 8 February 2014 Arnstadt
9 2.39 m (7 ft 10 in)   Dietmar Mögenburg (FRG) 24 February 1985 Cologne
  Ralf Sonn (GER) 1 March 1991 Berlin
11 2.38 m (7 ft 9+12 in)   Igor Paklin (URS) 7 March 1987 Indianapolis
  Gennadiy Avdeyenko (URS) 7 March 1987 Indianapolis
  Steve Smith (GBR) 4 February 1994 Wuppertal
  Wolf-Hendrik Beyer (GER) 18 March 1994 Weinheim
  Sorin Matei (ROU) 3 February 1995 Wuppertal
  Matt Hemingway (USA) 4 March 2000 Atlanta
  Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS) 15 February 2005 Stockholm
  Linus Thörnblad (SWE) 25 February 2007 Gothenburg
  Gianmarco Tamberi (ITA) 13 February 2016 Hustopeče
20 2.37 m (7 ft 9+14 in)   Artur Partyka (POL) 3 February 1991 Sulingen
  Dalton Grant (GBR) 13 March 1994 Paris
  Charles Austin (USA) 1 March 1996 Atlanta
  Vyacheslav Voronin (RUS) 5 March 2005 Glasgow
  Jaroslav Bába (CZE) 5 February 2000 Arnstadt
  Andrey Silnov (RUS) 2 February 2008 Arnstadt
  Danil Lysenko (ANA) 27 January 2018 Hustopeče
  Maksim Nedasekau (BLR) 7 March 2021 Toruń

Annulled marksEdit

  • Ivan Ukhov jumped 2.42 in Prague on 25 February 2014. This performance was annulled due to doping offences.

Women (indoor)Edit

Rank Mark Athlete Date Place Ref
1 2.08 m (6 ft 9+34 in)   Kajsa Bergqvist (SWE) 4 February 2006 Arnstadt
2 2.07 m (6 ft 9+14 in)   Heike Henkel (GER) 8 February 1992 Karlsruhe
3 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in)   Stefka Kostadinova (BUL) 20 February 1988 Athens
  Blanka Vlašić (CRO) 6 February 2010 Arnstadt
  Anna Chicherova (RUS) 4 February 2012 Arnstadt
  Yaroslava Mahuchikh (UKR) 2 February 2021 Banská Bystrica [22]
7 2.05 m (6 ft 8+12 in)   Tia Hellebaut (BEL) 3 March 2007 Birmingham
  Ariane Friedrich (GER) 15 February 2009 Karlsruhe
  Mariya Lasitskene (RUS) 9 February 2020 Moscow
10 2.04 m (6 ft 8+14 in)   Alina Astafei (GER) 3 March 1995 Berlin
  Yelena Slesarenko (RUS) 7 March 2004 Budapest
  Antonietta Di Martino (ITA) 9 February 2011 Banská Bystrica
13 2.03 m (6 ft 7+34 in)   Tamara Bykova (URS) 6 March 1983 Budapest
  Monica Iagăr (ROU) 23 January 1999 Bucharest
  Marina Kuptsova (RUS) 2 March 2002 Vienna
16 2.02 m (6 ft 7+12 in)   Susanne Beyer (GDR) 8 March 1987 Indianapolis
  Venelina Veneva-Mateeva (BUL) 2 February 2002 Łódź
  Yelena Yelesina (RUS) 26 February 2003 Moscow
2.02 m (6 ft 7+12 in) A   Chaunte Lowe (USA) 26 February 2012 Albuquerque
2.02 m (6 ft 7+12 in)   Kamila Lićwinko (POL) 21 February 2015 Toruń
21 2.01 m (6 ft 7 in)   Gabriele Günz (GDR) 31 January 1988 Stuttgart
  Ioamnet Quintero (CUB) 5 March 1993 Berlin
  Tisha Waller (USA) 28 February 1998 Atlanta
  Ruth Beitia (ESP) 24 February 2007 Piraeus
  Vita Palamar (UKR) 9 March 2008 Valencia
  Irina Gordeeva (RUS) 28 January 2009 Cottbus
  Airinė Palšytė (LTU) 4 March 2017 Belgrade

Olympic medalistsEdit

MenEdit

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1896 Athens
details
Ellery Harding Clark
  United States
James Connolly
  United States
none awarded
Robert Garrett
  United States
1900 Paris
details
Irving Baxter
  United States
Patrick Leahy
  Great Britain
Lajos Gönczy
  Hungary
1904 St. Louis
details
Samuel Jones
  United States
Garrett Serviss
  United States
Paul Weinstein
  Germany
1908 London
details
Harry Porter
  United States
Géo André
  France
none awarded
Con Leahy
  Great Britain
István Somodi
  Hungary
1912 Stockholm
details
Alma Richards
  United States
Hans Liesche
  Germany
George Horine
  United States
1920 Antwerp
details
Richmond Landon
  United States
Harold Muller
  United States
Bo Ekelund
  Sweden
1924 Paris
details
Harold Osborn
  United States
Leroy Brown
  United States
Pierre Lewden
  France
1928 Amsterdam
details
Bob King
  United States
Benjamin Hedges
  United States
Claude Ménard
  France
1932 Los Angeles
details
Duncan McNaughton
  Canada
Bob Van Osdel
  United States
Simeon Toribio
  Philippines
1936 Berlin
details
Cornelius Johnson
  United States
Dave Albritton
  United States
Delos Thurber
  United States
1948 London
details
John Winter
  Australia
Bjørn Paulson
  Norway
George Stanich
  United States
1952 Helsinki
details
Walt Davis
  United States
Ken Wiesner
  United States
José da Conceição
  Brazil
1956 Melbourne
details
Charles Dumas
  United States
Chilla Porter
  Australia
Igor Kashkarov
  Soviet Union
1960 Rome
details
Robert Shavlakadze
  Soviet Union
Valeriy Brumel
  Soviet Union
John Thomas
  United States
1964 Tokyo
details
Valeriy Brumel
  Soviet Union
John Thomas
  United States
John Rambo
  United States
1968 Mexico City
details
Dick Fosbury
  United States
Ed Caruthers
  United States
Valentin Gavrilov
  Soviet Union
1972 Munich
details
Jüri Tarmak
  Soviet Union
Stefan Junge
  East Germany
Dwight Stones
  United States
1976 Montreal
details
Jacek Wszoła
  Poland
Greg Joy
  Canada
Dwight Stones
  United States
1980 Moscow
details
Gerd Wessig
  East Germany
Jacek Wszoła
  Poland
Jörg Freimuth
  East Germany
1984 Los Angeles
details
Dietmar Mögenburg
  West Germany
Patrik Sjöberg
  Sweden
Zhu Jianhua
  China
1988 Seoul
details
Hennadiy Avdyeyenko
  Soviet Union
Hollis Conway
  United States
Rudolf Povarnitsyn
  Soviet Union
Patrik Sjöberg
  Sweden
1992 Barcelona
details
Javier Sotomayor
  Cuba
Patrik Sjöberg
  Sweden
Hollis Conway
  United States
Tim Forsyth
  Australia
Artur Partyka
  Poland
1996 Atlanta
details
Charles Austin
  United States
Artur Partyka
  Poland
Steve Smith
  Great Britain
2000 Sydney
details
Sergey Klyugin
  Russia
Javier Sotomayor
  Cuba
Abderahmane Hammad
  Algeria
2004 Athens
details
Stefan Holm
  Sweden
Matt Hemingway
  United States
Jaroslav Bába
  Czech Republic
2008 Beijing
details
Andrey Silnov
  Russia
Germaine Mason
  Great Britain
Yaroslav Rybakov
  Russia
2012 London
details
Erik Kynard
  United States
Mutaz Essa Barshim
  Qatar
none awarded
Derek Drouin
  Canada
Robert Grabarz
  Great Britain
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Derek Drouin
  Canada
Mutaz Essa Barshim
  Qatar
Bohdan Bondarenko
  Ukraine
2020 Tokyo
details
Gianmarco Tamberi
  Italy
none awarded Maksim Nedasekau
  Belarus
Mutaz Essa Barshim
  Qatar

WomenEdit

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1928 Amsterdam
details
Ethel Catherwood
  Canada
Lien Gisolf
  Netherlands
Mildred Wiley
  United States
1932 Los Angeles
details
Jean Shiley
  United States
Babe Didrikson
  United States
Eva Dawes
  Canada
1936 Berlin
details
Ibolya Csák
  Hungary
Dorothy Odam
  Great Britain
Elfriede Kaun
  Germany
1948 London
details
Alice Coachman
  United States
Dorothy Tyler
  Great Britain
Micheline Ostermeyer
  France
1952 Helsinki
details
Esther Brand
  South Africa
Sheile Lerwill
  Great Britain
Aleksandra Chudina
  Soviet Union
1956 Melbourne
details
Mildred McDaniel
  United States
Thelma Hopkins
  Great Britain
none awarded
Mariya Pisareva
  Soviet Union
1960 Rome
details
Iolanda Balaș
  Romania
Jarosława Jóźwiakowska
  Poland
none awarded
Dorothy Shirley
  Great Britain
1964 Tokyo
details
Iolanda Balaș
  Romania
Michele Brown
  Australia
Taisia Chenchik
  Soviet Union
1968 Mexico City
details
Miloslava Rezková
  Czechoslovakia
Antonina Okorokova
  Soviet Union
Valentina Kozyr
  Soviet Union
1972 Munich
details
Ulrike Meyfarth
  West Germany
Yordanka Blagoeva
  Bulgaria
Ilona Gusenbauer
  Austria
1976 Montreal
details
Rosemarie Ackermann
  East Germany
Sara Simeoni
  Italy
Yordanka Blagoeva
  Bulgaria
1980 Moscow
details
Sara Simeoni
  Italy
Urszula Kielan
  Poland
Jutta Kirst
  East Germany
1984 Los Angeles
details
Ulrike Meyfarth
  West Germany
Sara Simeoni
  Italy
Joni Huntley
  United States
1988 Seoul
details
Louise Ritter
  United States
Stefka Kostadinova
  Bulgaria
Tamara Bykova
  Soviet Union
1992 Barcelona
details
Heike Henkel
  Germany
Alina Astafei
  Romania
Ioamnet Quintero
  Cuba
1996 Atlanta
details
Stefka Kostadinova
  Bulgaria
Niki Bakoyianni
  Greece
Inha Babakova
  Ukraine
2000 Sydney
details
Yelena Yelesina
  Russia
Hestrie Cloete
  South Africa
Kajsa Bergqvist
  Sweden
Oana Pantelimon
  Romania
2004 Athens
details
Yelena Slesarenko
  Russia
Hestrie Cloete
  South Africa
Vita Styopina
  Ukraine
2008 Beijing
details
Tia Hellebaut
  Belgium
Blanka Vlašić
  Croatia
Chaunté Howard
  United States
2012 London
details
Anna Chicherova
  Russia
Brigetta Barrett
  United States
Ruth Beitia
  Spain
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Ruth Beitia
  Spain
Mirela Demireva
  Bulgaria
Blanka Vlašić
  Croatia
2020 Tokyo
details
Mariya Lasitskene
  ROC
Nicola McDermott
  Australia
Yaroslava Mahuchikh
  Ukraine

World Championships medalistsEdit

MenEdit

Championships Gold Silver Bronze
1983 Helsinki
details
  Hennadiy Avdyeyenko (URS)   Tyke Peacock (USA)   Zhu Jianhua (CHN)
1987 Rome
details
  Patrik Sjöberg (SWE)   Hennadiy Avdyeyenko (URS)
  Igor Paklin (URS)
none awarded
1991 Tokyo
details
  Charles Austin (USA)   Javier Sotomayor (CUB)   Hollis Conway (USA)
1993 Stuttgart
details
  Javier Sotomayor (CUB)   Artur Partyka (POL)   Steve Smith (GBR)
1995 Gothenburg
details
  Troy Kemp (BAH)   Javier Sotomayor (CUB)   Artur Partyka (POL)
1997 Athens
details
  Javier Sotomayor (CUB)   Artur Partyka (POL)   Tim Forsyth (AUS)
1999 Seville
details
  Vyacheslav Voronin (RUS)   Mark Boswell (CAN)   Martin Buß (GER)
2001 Edmonton
details
  Martin Buß (GER)   Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS)
  Vyacheslav Voronin (RUS)
none awarded
2003 Saint-Denis
details
  Jacques Freitag (RSA)   Stefan Holm (SWE)   Mark Boswell (CAN)
2005 Helsinki
details
  Yuriy Krymarenko (UKR)   Víctor Moya (CUB)
  Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS)
none awarded
2007 Osaka
details
  Donald Thomas (BAH)   Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS)   Kyriakos Ioannou (CYP)
2009 Berlin
details
  Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS)   Kyriakos Ioannou (CYP)   Sylwester Bednarek (POL)
  Raúl Spank (GER)
2011 Daegu
details
  Jesse Williams (USA)   Aleksey Dmitrik (RUS)   Trevor Barry (BAH)
2013 Moscow
details
  Bohdan Bondarenko (UKR)   Mutaz Essa Barshim (QAT)   Derek Drouin (CAN)
2015 Beijing
details
  Derek Drouin (CAN)   Bohdan Bondarenko (UKR)
  Zhang Guowei (CHN)
none awarded
2017 London
details
  Mutaz Essa Barshim (QAT)   Danil Lysenko (ANA)   Majd Eddin Ghazal (SYR)
2019 Doha
details
  Mutaz Essa Barshim (QAT)   Mikhail Akimenko (ANA)   Ilya Ivanyuk (ANA)
2022 Eugene
details
  Mutaz Essa Barshim (QAT)   Woo Sang-hyeok (KOR)   Andriy Protsenko (UKR)

Medal tableEdit

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Qatar (QAT)3104
2  Russia (RUS)2507
3  Cuba (CUB)2305
4  Ukraine (UKR)2114
  United States (USA)2114
6  Bahamas (BAH)2013
7  Soviet Union (URS)1203
8  Canada (CAN)1124
9  Sweden (SWE)1102
10  Germany (GER)1012
11  South Africa (RSA)1001
12  Poland (POL)0224
  Authorised Neutral Athletes (ANA)0213
13  China (CHN)0112
  Cyprus (CYP)0112
  South Korea (KOR)0112
16  Australia (AUS)0011
  Great Britain (GBR)0011
  Syria (SYR)0011
Totals (18 entries)18221555

WomenEdit

Championships Gold Silver Bronze
1983 Helsinki
details
  Tamara Bykova (URS)   Ulrike Meyfarth (FRG)   Louise Ritter (USA)
1987 Rome
details
  Stefka Kostadinova (BUL)   Tamara Bykova (URS)   Susanne Beyer (GDR)
1991 Tokyo
details
  Heike Henkel (GER)   Yelena Yelesina (URS)   Inha Babakova (URS)
1993 Stuttgart
details
  Ioamnet Quintero (CUB)   Silvia Costa (CUB)   Sigrid Kirchmann (AUT)
1995 Gothenburg
details
  Stefka Kostadinova (BUL)   Alina Astafei (GER)   Inha Babakova (UKR)
1997 Athens
details
  Hanne Haugland (NOR)   Inha Babakova (UKR)
  Olga Kaliturina (RUS)
none awarded
1999 Seville
details
  Inha Babakova (UKR)   Yelena Yelesina (RUS)   Svetlana Lapina (RUS)
2001 Edmonton
details
  Hestrie Cloete (RSA)   Inha Babakova (UKR)   Kajsa Bergqvist (SWE)
2003 Saint-Denis
details
  Hestrie Cloete (RSA)   Marina Kuptsova (RUS)   Kajsa Bergqvist (SWE)
2005 Helsinki
details
  Kajsa Bergqvist (SWE)   Chaunté Howard (USA)   Emma Green (SWE)
2007 Osaka
details
  Blanka Vlašić (CRO)   Anna Chicherova (RUS)
  Antonietta Di Martino (ITA)
none awarded
2009 Berlin
details
  Blanka Vlašić (CRO)   Ariane Friedrich (GER)   Antonietta Di Martino (ITA)
2011 Daegu
details
  Anna Chicherova (RUS)   Blanka Vlašić (CRO)   Antonietta Di Martino (ITA)
2013 Moscow
details
  Brigetta Barrett (USA)   Anna Chicherova (RUS)
  Ruth Beitia (ESP)
none awarded
2015 Beijing
details
  Mariya Kuchina (RUS)   Blanka Vlašić (CRO)   Anna Chicherova (RUS)
2017 London
details
  Mariya Lasitskene (ANA)   Yuliya Levchenko (UKR)   Kamila Lićwinko (POL)
2019 Doha
details
  Mariya Lasitskene (ANA)   Yaroslava Mahuchikh (UKR)   Vashti Cunningham (USA)
2022 Eugene
details
  Eleanor Patterson (AUS)   Yaroslava Mahuchikh (UKR)   Elena Vallortigara (ITA)

World Indoor Championships medalistsEdit

MenEdit

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1985 Paris[A]
details
  Patrik Sjöberg (SWE)   Javier Sotomayor (CUB)   Othmane Belfaa (ALG)
1987 Indianapolis
details
  Igor Paklin (URS)   Hennadiy Avdyeyenko (URS)   Ján Zvara (TCH)
1989 Budapest
details
  Javier Sotomayor (CUB)   Dietmar Mögenburg (FRG)   Patrik Sjöberg (SWE)
1991 Seville
details
  Hollis Conway (USA)   Artur Partyka (POL)   Javier Sotomayor (CUB)
  Aleksey Yemelin (URS)
1993 Toronto
details
  Javier Sotomayor (CUB)   Patrik Sjöberg (SWE)   Steve Smith (GBR)
1995 Barcelona
details
  Javier Sotomayor (CUB)   Labros Papakostas (GRE)   Tony Barton (USA)
1997 Paris
details
  Charles Austin (USA)   Labros Papakostas (GRE)   Dragutin Topić (FRY)
1999 Maebashi
details
  Javier Sotomayor (CUB)   Vyacheslav Voronin (RUS)   Charles Austin (USA)
2001 Lisbon
details
  Stefan Holm (SWE)   Andriy Sokolovskyy (UKR)   Staffan Strand (SWE)
2003 Birmingham
details
  Stefan Holm (SWE)   Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS)   Henadz Maroz (BLR)
2004 Budapest
details
  Stefan Holm (SWE)   Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS)   Ștefan Vasilache (ROU)
  Germaine Mason (JAM)
  Jaroslav Bába (CZE)
2006 Moscow
details
  Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS)   Andrey Tereshin (RUS)   Linus Thörnblad (SWE)
2008 Valencia
details
  Stefan Holm (SWE)   Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS)   Kyriakos Ioannou (CYP)
  Andra Manson (USA)
2010 Doha
details
  Ivan Ukhov (RUS)   Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS)   Dusty Jonas (USA)
2012 Istanbul
details
  Dimitrios Chondrokoukis (GRE)   Andrey Silnov (RUS)   Ivan Ukhov (RUS)
2014 Sopot
details
  Mutaz Essa Barshim (QAT)   Ivan Ukhov (RUS)   Andriy Protsenko (UKR)
2016 Portland
details
  Gianmarco Tamberi (ITA)   Robert Grabarz (GBR)   Erik Kynard (USA)
2018 Birmingham
details
  Danil Lysenko (ANA)   Mutaz Essa Barshim (QAT)   Mateusz Przybylko (GER)

WomenEdit

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1985 Paris[A]
details
  Stefka Kostadinova (BUL)   Susanne Lorentzon (SWE)   Debbie Brill (CAN)
  Danuta Bułkowska (POL)
  Silvia Costa (CUB)
1987 Indianapolis
details
  Stefka Kostadinova (BUL)   Susanne Beyer (GDR)   Emilia Dragieva (BUL)
1989 Budapest
details
  Stefka Kostadinova (BUL)   Tamara Bykova (URS)   Heike Redetzky (FRG)
1991 Seville
details
  Heike Henkel (GER)   Tamara Bykova (URS)   Heike Balck (GER)
1993 Toronto
details
  Stefka Kostadinova (BUL)   Heike Henkel (GER)   Inha Babakova (UKR)
1995 Barcelona
details
  Alina Astafei (GER)   Britta Bilač (SLO)   Heike Henkel (GER)
1997 Paris
details
  Stefka Kostadinova (BUL)   Inha Babakova (UKR)   Hanne Haugland (NOR)
1999 Maebashi
details
  Khristina Kalcheva (BUL)   Zuzana Hlavoňová (CZE)   Tisha Waller (USA)
2001 Lisbon
details
  Kajsa Bergqvist (SWE)   Inha Babakova (UKR)   Venelina Veneva (BUL)
2003 Birmingham
details
  Kajsa Bergqvist (SWE)   Yelena Yelesina (RUS)   Anna Chicherova (RUS)
2004 Budapest
details
  Yelena Slesarenko (RUS)   Anna Chicherova (RUS)   Blanka Vlašić (CRO)
2006 Moscow
details
  Yelena Slesarenko (RUS)   Blanka Vlašić (CRO)   Ruth Beitia (ESP)
2008 Valencia
details
  Blanka Vlašić (CRO)   Yelena Slesarenko (RUS)   Vita Palamar (UKR)
2010 Doha
details
  Blanka Vlašić (CRO)   Ruth Beitia (ESP)   Chaunté Lowe (USA)
2012 Istanbul
details
  Chaunté Lowe (USA)   Antonietta Di Martino (ITA)
  Anna Chicherova (RUS)
  Ebba Jungmark (SWE)
none awarded
2014 Sopot
details
  Mariya Kuchina (RUS)
  Kamila Lićwinko (POL)
none awarded   Ruth Beitia (ESP)
2016 Portland
details
  Vashti Cunningham (USA)   Ruth Beitia (ESP)   Kamila Lićwinko (POL)
2018 Birmingham
details
  Mariya Lasitskene (ANA)   Vashti Cunningham (USA)   Alessia Trost (ITA)
2022 Belgrade
details
  Yaroslava Mahuchikh (UKR)   Eleanor Patterson (AUS)   Nadezhda Dubovitskaya (KAZ)
  • A Known as the World Indoor Games.

Athletes with most medalsEdit

Athletes who have won multiple titles at the two most important competitions, the Olympic Games and the World Championships:

  • 4 wins: Mariya Lasitskene (RUS) - Olympic Champion in 2020, World Champion in 2015, 2017 & 2019
  • 3 wins: Javier Sotomayor (CUB) - Olympic Champion in 1992, World Champion in 1993 & 1997
  • 3 wins: Stefka Kostadinova (BUL) - Olympic Champion in 1996, World Champion in 1987 & 1995
  • 3 wins: Mutaz Essa Barshim (QAT) - Olympic Champion in 2020, World Champion in 2017 & 2019
  • 2 wins: Gennadiy Avdeyenko (URS) - Olympic Champion in 1988, World Champion in 1983
  • 2 wins: Charles Austin (USA) - Olympic Champion in 1996, World Champion in 1991
  • 2 wins: Iolanda Balas (ROM) - Olympic Champion in 1960 & 1964
  • 2 wins: Ulrike Meyfarth (FRG) - Olympic Champion in 1972 & 1984
  • 2 wins: Heike Henkel (GER) - Olympic Champion in 1992, World Champion in 1991
  • 2 wins: Hestrie Cloete (RSA) - World Champion in 2001 & 2003
  • 2 wins: Blanka Vlašić (CRO) - World Champion in 2007 & 2009
  • 2 wins: Anna Chicherova (RUS) - Olympic Champion in 2012, World Champion in 2011

Kostadinova and Sotomayor are the only high jumpers to have been Olympic Champion, World Champion and broken the world record.

MenEdit

Athlete Olympic Games World Championships World Indoor Championships Continental Championships Continental Indoor Championships Universiade Regional Games
Mediterranean
Pan American
Asian
Total
                                               
  Javier Sotomayor (CUB) 1 1 0 2 2 0 4 1 0 2 0 1 - - - 1 0 0 3 0 0 13 4 1
  Mutaz Essa Barshim (QAT) 1 2 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 5 0 0 - - - 2 0 0 12 4 1
  Dietmar Mögenburg (FRG) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 5 2 1 0 0 0 - - - 7 3 1
  Stefan Holm (SWE) 1 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 - - - 7 2 1
  Patrik Sjöberg (SWE) 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 - - - 6 3 2
  Lee Jin-Taek (KOR) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 - - - 1 0 1 2 0 0 6 1 1
  Igor Paklin (URS) 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 - - - 4 1 0
  Valeriy Brumel (URS) 1 1 0 - - - - - - 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 - - - 4 1 0
  Zhu Jianhua (CHN) 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 - - - 0 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 2
  Charles Austin (USA) 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 - - - 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1
  Yaroslav Rybakov (RUS) 0 0 1 1 3 0 1 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 - - - 3 8 2
  Dragutin Topić (SRB) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 4
  Vladimir Yashchenko (URS) 0 0 0 - - - - - - 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 - - - 3 0 0
  Gennadiy Avdeyenko (URS) 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 - - - 2 2 1
  Hollis Conway (USA) 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 - - - 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 2 3

WomenEdit

Athlete Olympic Games World Championships World Indoor Championships Continental Championships Continental Indoor Championships Universiade Regional Games
Mediterranean
Pan American
Commonwealth
Total
                                               
  Stefka Kostadinova (BUL) 1 1 0 2 0 0 5 0 0 1 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 - - - 13 2 0
  Sara Simeoni (ITA) 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 4 0 0 2 1 2 2 0 0 11 2 4
  Mariya Lasitskene (RUS) 1 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 - - - 9 2 0
  Ruth Beitia (ESP) 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 3 0 0 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 5 4
  Blanka Vlašić (CRO) 0 1 1 2 2 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 4 2
  Hestrie Cloete (RSA) 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 2 0
  Heike Henkel (FRG) 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 - - - 6 1 3
  Iolanda Balaş (ROU) 2 0 0 - - - - - - 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 - - - 6 1 0
  Ulrike Meyfarth (FRG) 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 - - - 5 2 0
  Kajsa Bergqvist (SWE) 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 - - - 5 1 4
  Rosemarie Ackermann (GDR) 1 0 0 - - - - - - 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 - - - 5 1 0
  Anna Chicherova (RUS) 1 0 * 1 2 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 - - - 4 4 3
  Tamara Bykova (URS) 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 - - - 4 2 2
Alina Astafei
(Romania & Germany)
0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 - - - 4 3 2
  Tia Hellebaut (BEL) 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 - - - 4 0 0
  Yelena Slesarenko (RUS) 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 - - - 3 1 1
  Antonietta Di Martino (ITA) 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 3 1

Season's bestsEdit

Height differentialsEdit

All time lists of athletes with the highest recorded jumps above their own height.[23][24]

MenEdit

Rank Differential Athlete Height Mark
1 0.59 m (1 ft 11 in) Franklin Jacobs 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 2.32 m (7 ft 7+14 in)
Stefan Holm 1.81 m (5 ft 11+14 in) 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in)
3 0.58 m (1 ft 10+34 in) Rick Noji 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in)
Anton Riepl 1.75 m (5 ft 8+34 in) 2.33 m (7 ft 7+12 in)
Linus Thörnblad 1.80 m (5 ft 10+34 in) 2.38 m (7 ft 9+12 in)
6 0.57 m (1 ft 10+14 in) Hollis Conway 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in)
7 0.56 m (1 ft 10 in) Takahiro Kimino 1.76 m (5 ft 9+14 in) 2.32 m (7 ft 7+14 in)
Sorin Matei 1.84 m (6 ft 14 in) 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in)
Charles Austin 1.84 m (6 ft 14 in) 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in)
Aleksey Dmitrik 1.84 m (6 ft 14 in) 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in)
11 0.55 m (1 ft 9+12 in) Hari Shankar Roy 1.70 m (5 ft 6+34 in) 2.25 m (7 ft 4+12 in)
Robert Wolski 1.76 m (5 ft 9+14 in) 2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in)
Marcello Benvenuti 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 2.33 m (7 ft 7+12 in)
Milton Ottey 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 2.33 m (7 ft 7+12 in)

WomenEdit

Rank Differential Athlete Height Mark
1 0.35 m (1 ft 1+34 in) Antonietta Di Martino 1.69 m (5 ft 6+12 in) 2.04 m (6 ft 8+14 in)
2 0.33 m (1 ft 34 in) Niki Bakoyianni 1.70 m (5 ft 6+34 in) 2.03 m (6 ft 7+34 in)
Kajsa Bergqvist 1.75 m (5 ft 8+34 in) 2.08 m (6 ft 9+34 in)
4 0.32 m (1 ft 12 in) Emilia Dragieva 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in) 2.00 m (6 ft 6+12 in)
Yolanda Henry 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in) 2.00 m (6 ft 6+12 in)
6 0.31 m (1 ft 0 in) Marie Collonvillé 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 1.94 m (6 ft 4+14 in)
Inika McPherson 1.65 m (5 ft 4+34 in) 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in)
8 0.30 m (11+34 in) Cindy Holmes 1.53 m (5 ft 0 in) 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Jessica Ennis 1.65 m (5 ft 4+34 in) 1.95 m (6 ft 4+34 in)
Antonella Bevilacqua 1.69 m (5 ft 6+12 in) 1.99 m (6 ft 6+14 in)
Lyudmila Andonova 1.77 m (5 ft 9+12 in) 2.07 m (6 ft 9+14 in)

National recordsEdit

MenEdit

NR's equal or superior to 2.20 m:

Nation Mark Athlete Date Place
  Cuba 2.45 m (8 ft 14 in) Javier Sotomayor 27 July 1993 Salamanca
  Qatar 2.43 m (7 ft 11+12 in) Mutaz Essa Barshim 5 September 2014 Brussels
  Sweden 2.42 m (7 ft 11+14 in) Patrik Sjöberg 30 June 1987 Stockholm
  Germany 2.42 m (7 ft 11+14 in) i Carlo Thränhardt 26 February 1988 Berlin
  Ukraine 2.42 m (7 ft 11+14 in) Bohdan Bondarenko 14 June 2014 New York City
  Kyrgyzstan 2.41 m (7 ft 10+34 in) Igor Paklin 4 September 1985 Kobe
  Romania 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Sorin Matei 20 June 1990 Bratislava
  United States 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) i Hollis Conway 10 March 1991 Seville
2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Charles Austin 7 August 1991 Zürich
  Russia 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Vyacheslav Voronin 5 August 2000 London
2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) i Ivan Ukhov 25 February 2009 Piraeus
Aleksey Dmitrik 8 February 2014 Arnstadt
  Canada 2.40 m (7 ft 10+14 in) Derek Drouin 25 April 2014 Des Moines
  China 2.39 m (7 ft 10 in) Zhu Jianhua 11 June 1983 Beijing
  Italy 2.39 m (7 ft 10 in) Gianmarco Tamberi 15 July 2016 Monaco
  Serbia 2.38 m (7 ft 9+12 in) Dragutin Topic 1 August 1993 Belgrade
  United Kingdom 2.38 m (7 ft 9+12 in) i Steve Smith 4 February 1994 Wuppertal
  Bahamas 2.38 m (7 ft 9+12 in) Troy Kemp 12 July 1995 Nice
  Poland 2.38 m (7 ft 9+12 in) Artur Partyka 18 August 1996 Eberstadt
  South Africa 2.38 m (7 ft 9+12 in) Jacques Freitag 5 March 2005 Oudtshoorn
  Azerbaijan 2.37 m (7 ft 9+14 in) Valeriy Sereda 2 September 1984 Rieti
  Czech Republic 2.37 m (7 ft 9+14 in) i Jaroslav Bába 5 February 2005 Arnstadt
  Belarus 2.37 m (7 ft 9+14 in) i Maksim Nedasekau 7 March 2021 Toruń
2.37 m (7 ft 9+14 in) 6 July 2021 Székesfehérvár
1 August 2021 Tokyo
  Kazakhstan 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) Sergey Zasimovich 5 May 1984 Tashkent
  Belgium 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) Eddy Annys 26 May 1985 Ghent
  Slovakia 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) Jan Zvara 23 August 1987 Prague
  Bermuda 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) Clarence Saunders 1 February 1990 Auckland
  Bulgaria 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) Georgi Dakov 10 August 1990 Brussels
  Greece 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) Lambros Papakostas 21 July 1992 Athens
  Norway 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) i Steinar Hoen 12 February 1994 Balingen
3 March 1995 Berlin
2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) 1 July 1997 Oslo
  Australia 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) Tim Forsyth 2 March 1997 Melbourne
Brandon Starc 26 August 2018 Eberstadt
  Israel 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) Konstantin Matusevich 5 February 2000 Perth
  Syria 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) Majd Eddin Ghazal 18 May 2016 Beijing
  South Korea 2.36 m (7 ft 8+34 in) i Woo Sang-hyeok 5 February 2022 Hustopeče
  France 2.35 m (7 ft 8+12 in) i Jean-Charles Gicquel 13 March 1994 Paris
  Cyprus 2.35 m (7 ft 8+12 in) Kyriakos Ioannou 29 August 2007 Osaka
  Japan 2.35 m (7 ft 8+12 in) i Naoto Tobe 2 February 2019 Karlsruhe
  Lithuania 2.34 m (7 ft 8 in) Rolandas Verkys 16 June 1991 Warsaw
  Spain 2.34 m (7 ft 8 in) Arturo Ortiz 22 June 1991 Barcelona
  Algeria 2.34 m (7 ft 8 in) Abderrahmane Hammad 14 July 2000 Algiers
  Jamaica 2.34 m (7 ft 8 in) Germaine Mason 9 August 2003 Santo Domingo
  Botswana 2.34 m (7 ft 8 in) Kabelo Kgosiemang 4 May 2008 Addis Ababa
  Colombia 2.33 m (7 ft 7+12 in) A Gilmar Mayo 17 October 1994 Pereira
  Finland 2.33 m (7 ft 7+12 in) i Osku Torro 5 February 2011 Tampere
  Switzerland 2.33 m (7 ft 7+12 in) Loïc Gasch 8 May 2021 Lausanne
  Uzbekistan 2.32 m (7 ft 7+14 in) Gennadiy Belkov 29 May 1982 Tashkent
  Nigeria 2.32 m (7 ft 7+14 in) i Anthony Idiata 15 February 2000 Patras
  Brazil 2.32 m (7 ft 7+14 in) Jessé de Lima 2 September 2008 Lausanne
  Slovenia 2.32 m (7 ft 7+14 in) Rožle Prezelj 17 June 2012 Maribor
  Tajikistan 2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in) Oleg Palaschevskiy 12 August 1990 Bryansk
  Bosnia and Herzegovina 2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in) Elvir Krehmic 7 July 1998 Zagreb
  Netherlands 2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in) i Wilbert Pennings 9 February 2002 Siegen
  Saint Lucia 2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in) Darvin Edwards 30 August 2011 Daegu
  Peru 2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in) A Arturo Chávez 11 June 2016 Mexico City
  Venezuela 2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in) Eure Yáñez 23 June 2017 Luque
  New Zealand 2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in) Hamish Kerr 20 February 2021 Wellington
2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in) i 20 March 2022 Belgrade
  Mexico 2.31 m (7 ft 6+34 in) Edgar Rivera 2 June 2021 Šamorín
  Latvia 2.30 m (7 ft 6+12 in) Normunds Sietiņš 20 July 1992 Nurmijärvi
  Estonia 2.30 m (7 ft 6+12 in) Marko Turban 5 June 1996 Rakvere
  Ireland 2.30 m (7 ft 6+12 in) Adrian O'Dwyer 24 June 2004 Algiers
  Ecuador 2.30 m (7 ft 6+12 in) Diego Ferrín 27 October 2011 Guadalajara
  Malaysia 2.30 m (7 ft 6+12 in) Nauraj Singh Randhawa 27 April 2017 Singapore
  Turkey 2.30 m (7 ft 6+12 in) Alperen Acet 3 June 2018 Cluj-Napoca
  Kenya 2.30 m (7 ft 6+12 in) A Mathieu Sawe 6 June 2018 Nairobi
2.30 m (7 ft 6+12 in) 3 August 2018 Asaba
  Sri Lanka 2.30 m (7 ft 6+12 in) Ushan Thiwanka 8 May 2021 Canyon
  Chinese Taipei 2.29 m (7 ft 6 in) Hsiang Chun-hsien 21 October 2015 Kaohsiung
  Puerto Rico 2.29 m (7 ft 6 in) David Adley Smith II 23 April 2016 Auburn
Luis Castro 28 May 2016 Sinn
  India 2.29 m (7 ft 6 in) Tejaswin Shankar 27 April 2018 Lubbock
  Croatia 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) Novica Čanović 6 July 1985 Split
2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) i 25 February 1986 Solna
  Austria 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) Markus Einberger 18 May 1986 Schwechat
  Mauritius 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) Khemraj Naiko 27 May 1996 Dakar
  Iceland 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) i Einar Karl Hjartarson 20 February 2001 Reykjavík
  Hungary 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) László Boros 6 July 2005 Debrecen
  Sudan 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) i Mohamed Younes Idris 23 February 2014 Bordeaux
2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) 27 May 2015 Namur
  Cameroon 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) Fernand Djoumessi 19 June 2014 Bühl
  Saint Kitts and Nevis 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) Jermaine Francis 1 August 2018 Barranquilla
  Denmark 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) Janick Klausen 20 June 2019 Essen
  Portugal 2.28 m (7 ft 5+34 in) i Paulo Conceição 1 February 2020 Kirchberg
  Lebanon 2.27 m (7 ft 5+14 in) Jean-Claude Rabbath 23 April 2004 Beirut
12 June 2004 Bucharest
  Antigua and Barbuda 2.27 m (7 ft 5+14 in) James Grayman 7 July 2007 Pergine Valsugana