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IAAF World Championships in Athletics

  (Redirected from World Championships in Athletics)

The IAAF World Championships, commonly referred to as the World Championships in Athletics, is a biennial athletics event organized by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). The World Championships was started in 1976 in response to the International Olympic Committee dropping the men's 50 km walk from the Olympic athletics programme for the 1976 Montreal Olympics, despite its constant presence at the games since 1932. The IAAF chose to host its own world championship event instead, a month and a half after the Olympics.[1][2] It was the first World Championships that the IAAF had hosted separate from the Olympic Games (traditionally the main championship for the sport). A second limited event was held in 1980, and a major expansion in 1983 is considered the official start of the event. It was then held every four years until 1991, when it switched to a two year cycle.

IAAF World Championships in Athletics
Sport Athletics
Founded 1983
Continent International (IAAF)
Most recent
champion(s)
Last winners lists
TV partner(s) SBS Two (Australia)
CBC (Canada)
Eurovision (Europe except United Kingdom)
KBS (South Korea)
CCTV (China)
TBS (Japan)
BBC (United Kingdom)
NBCUniversal (United States)
Sportv (Brazil)
TyC Sports (Latin America except Brazil)

Contents

HistoryEdit

The idea of having an Athletics World Championships was around well before the competition's first event in 1983. In 1913, the IAAF decided that the Olympic Games would serve as the World Championships for athletics. This was considered suitable for over 50 years until in the late 1960s the desire of many IAAF members to have their own World Championships began to grow. In 1976 at the IAAF Council Meeting in Puerto Rico an Athletics World Championships separate from the Olympic Games was approved.

Following bids from both Stuttgart, West Germany and Helsinki, Finland, the IAAF Council awarded the inaugural competition to Helsinki, to take place in 1983 and be held in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium (where the 1952 Summer Olympics had been held).

Two IAAF world championship events preceded the inaugural edition of the World Championships in Athletics in 1983. The 1976 World Championships had just one event – the men's 50 kilometres walk which was dropped from the Olympic programme for the 1976 Summer Olympics and the IAAF responded by setting up their own contest. Four years later, the 1980 World Championships contained only two newly approved women's events, (400 metres hurdles and 3000 metres), neither of which featured on the programme for the 1980 Summer Olympics.[3][4]

Over the years the competition has grown in size. In 1983 an estimated 1,300 athletes from 154 countries participated.[5] By the 2003 competition, in Paris, it had grown to 1,907 athletes from 203 countries with coverage being transmitted to 179 different countries.

There has also been a change in composition over the years, with several new events, all for women, being added. By 2005, the only differences were men's competition in the 50 km walk, and equivalent events in women's 100 m hurdles and heptathlon to men's 110 m hurdles and decathlon.

The following list shows when new events were added for the first time.

ChampionshipsEdit

Edition Year City Country Date Venue Capacity Events Nations Athletes Top of the
medal table
- 1976 Malmö Sweden 18 Sep Malmö Stadion 30,000 1 20 42   Soviet Union
- 1980 Sittard Netherlands 14 Aug – 16 Aug De Baandert 22,000 2 21 42   East Germany
1st 1983 Helsinki Finland 7 Aug – 14 Aug Olympiastadion 50,000 41 153 1,333   East Germany
2nd 1987 Rome Italy 28 Aug – 6 Sep Stadio Olimpico 60,000 43 156 1,419   East Germany
3rd 1991 Tokyo Japan 23 Aug – 1 Sep Olympic Stadium 48,000 43 162 1,491   United States
4th 1993 Stuttgart Germany 13 Aug – 22 Aug Gottlieb-Daimler-Stadion 70,000 44 187 1,630   United States
5th 1995 Gothenburg Sweden 5 Aug – 13 Aug Ullevi 42,000 44 190 1,755   United States
6th 1997 Athens Greece 1 Aug – 10 Aug Olympiako Stadio 75,000 44 197 1,785   United States
7th 1999 Seville Spain 20 Aug – 29 Aug Estadio Olímpico 70,000 46 200 1,750   United States
8th 2001 Edmonton Canada 3 Aug – 12 Aug Commonwealth Stadium 60,000 46 189 1,677   Russia
9th 2003 Saint-Denis France 23 Aug – 31 Aug Stade de France 78,000 46 198 1,679   United States
10th 2005 Helsinki Finland 6 Aug – 14 Aug Olympiastadion 45,000 47 191 1,688   United States
11th 2007 Osaka Japan 24 Aug – 2 Sep Nagai Stadium 45,000 47 197 1,800   United States
12th 2009 Berlin Germany 15 Aug – 23 Aug Olympiastadion 74,000 47 200 1,895   United States
13th 2011 Daegu South Korea 27 Aug – 4 Sep Daegu Stadium 65,000 47 199 1,742   United States
14th 2013 Moscow Russia 10 Aug – 18 Aug Luzhniki Stadium 78,000 47 203 1,784   United States
15th 2015 Beijing China 22 Aug – 30 Aug Beijing National Stadium 80,000 47 205 1,771   Kenya
16th 2017 London United Kingdom 4 Aug – 13 Aug London Stadium 60,000 48 205 2,036   United States
17th 2019 Doha Qatar 25 Sep – 6 Oct Khalifa International Stadium 48,000 49
18th 2021 Eugene United States 6 Aug – 15 Aug Hayward Field 30,000 49

All-time medal tableEdit

 
Proportional symbol map of the world showing medal totals by country since 1983 for the IAAF World Championships in Athletics

Updated after 2017 Championships

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1   United States (USA) 155 106 91 352
2   Kenya (KEN) 55 48 37 140
3   Russia (RUS) 47 54 50 151
4   Germany (GER) 36 35 43 114
5   Jamaica (JAM) 32 44 39 115
6   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 28 33 38 99
7   Ethiopia (ETH) 27 25 25 77
8   Soviet Union (URS) 23 27 28 78
9   Cuba (CUB) 21 23 13 57
10   East Germany (GDR) 21 19 16 56
11   Poland (POL) 17 14 22 53
12   China (CHN) 15 21 17 53
13   Czech Republic (CZE) 14 6 5 25
14   France (FRA) 13 17 22 52
15   South Africa (RSA) 12 6 9 27
16   Italy (ITA) 11 15 17 43
17   Australia (AUS) 11 14 10 35
18   Ukraine (UKR) 11 11 15 37
19   Belarus (BLR) 10 13 12 35
20   Morocco (MAR) 10 12 7 29
21   Sweden (SWE) 8 5 5 18
22   Norway 8 4 4 16
23   Spain 7 16 15 38
24   Bahamas (BAH) 7 8 8 23
25   Finland 7 8 7 22
26   Canada 6 13 12 31
27   Portugal 6 6 7 19
28   Bahrain 6 2 2 10
29   New Zealand 6 1 0 7
30   Algeria 6 0 3 9
31   Romania 5 8 10 23
32   Greece (GRE) 5 6 10 21
33   Bulgaria 5 3 8 16
34   Japan 4 7 15 26
35   Czechoslovakia 4 4 3 11
36   Croatia 4 3 1 8
37   Ireland 4 2 0 6
38   Colombia 4 1 1 6
39    Switzerland 4 0 3 7
40   West Germany 3 6 3 12
41   Netherlands 3 5 9 17
42   Trinidad and Tobago 3 5 7 15
43   Mexico 3 4 7 14
44   Qatar 3 2 2 7
45   Lithuania 3 2 1 6
46   Mozambique 3 1 1 5
47   Ecuador 3 1 0 4
48   Denmark 3 0 1 4
49   Estonia (EST) 2 4 2 8
50   Uganda 2 2 2 6
51   Dominican Republic 2 1 1 4
52   Tajikistan 2 1 0 3
53   Brazil (BRA) 1 6 6 13
  Authorised Neutral Athletes (ANA)[1] 1 5 0 6
54   Namibia 1 4 0 5
55   Turkey (TUR) 1 2 1 4
56   Zambia 1 2 0 3
57   Belgium 1 1 4 6
58   Slovenia 1 1 3 5
59   Tunisia 1 1 1 3
60   Botswana 1 1 0 2
  Eritrea 1 1 0 2
  Panama 1 1 0 2
63   Saint Kitts and Nevis 1 0 4 5
64   Slovakia 1 0 3 4
65   Syria 1 0 2 3
66   Grenada 1 0 1 2
  Senegal 1 0 1 2
  Somalia 1 0 1 2
  Venezuela 1 0 1 2
70   Barbados 1 0 0 1
  North Korea 1 0 0 1
72   Hungary 0 7 6 13
73   Nigeria 0 4 4 8
74   Ivory Coast 0 4 0 4
75   Kazakhstan 0 3 5 8
76   Burundi 0 2 1 3
  Djibouti 0 2 1 3
  Israel (ISR) 0 2 1 3
79   Cameroon 0 2 0 2
  Puerto Rico 0 2 0 2
81   Austria 0 1 1 2
  Cyprus 0 1 1 2
  Ghana 0 1 1 2
  Latvia 0 1 1 2
  Sri Lanka 0 1 1 2
  Suriname 0 1 1 2
  Tanzania 0 1 1 2
88   Bermuda 0 1 0 1
  Egypt 0 1 0 1
  Sudan 0 1 0 1
91   Serbia 0 0 3 3
92   American Samoa 0 0 1 1
  Bosnia and Herzegovina (BIH) 0 0 1 1
  Cayman Islands 0 0 1 1
  Dominica 0 0 1 1
  Haiti 0 0 1 1
  India 0 0 1 1
  Iran 0 0 1 1
  Saudi Arabia 0 0 1 1
  South Korea 0 0 1 1
  Zimbabwe 0 0 1 1
Total 730 737 732 2199
Notes

^[1]   ANA was the name, under which Russian athletes competed in the 2017 Championships. Their medals were not included in the official medal table.[6]

All-time placing tableEdit

In the IAAF placing table the total score is obtained from assigning eight points to the first place and so on to one point for the eight placed finalists. Points are shared in situations where a tie occurs. However, the IAAF site shows all points rounded to the nearest integer.

Updated after 2015 Championships (30 June 2017)[7]

Rank Country       4 5 6 7 8 Medals Points
1   United States 145 94+1= 80+2= 62+5= 72+3= 62+2= 62+1= 58+4= 322 3320
2   Germany 59 56 60+2= 69+2= 60+1= 59+1= 49+5= 40+1= 177 2156.5
3   Russia 48 51+5= 50+3= 50+2= 45+3= 45+1= 38+1= 41 157 1795.5
4   Kenya 50 46 33 37 33 21 38 16 129 1392
5   Jamaica 31 44 35+1= 25 24 21 24 20 111 1123.5
6   Great Britain 25 31 36 32+2= 43+1= 24 26+1= 18 92 1120.5
7   Soviet Union 23 25+2= 28 21+1= 17 12 11 17+1= 78 793
8   Ethiopia 25 22 25 18 15 13 16 13 72 738
9   France 10 17 19+1= 21 25+1= 26 23+1= 29+1= 47 679.6
10   Cuba 21 22+1= 12 27 7+2= 15 20 17 56 672.5
11   China 13 17+1= 15 19 25 16+1= 17 15 46 614
12   Poland 15 11+1= 14+3= 21+1= 16 18+1= 21+1= 18+2= 44 595.3
13   Italy 11 14+1= 15 12 17+2= 22 28+3= 25+1= 41 568
14   Spain 7 16 14+1 15 18 22 11 16 38 508.5
15   Ukraine 11 8+2= 13 19 17 14+1= 19+1= 7 34 487.6

Multiple medalistsEdit

Multiple winnersEdit

Boldface denotes active athletes and highest medal count among all athletes (including these who not included in these tables) per type.

MenEdit

All eventsEdit

Rank Athlete Country Events From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Usain Bolt   Jamaica 100 m / 200 m / 4 × 100 m relay 2007 2017 11 2 1 14
2 LaShawn Merritt   United States 400 m / 4 × 400 m relay 2005 2015 * 8 * 3 - * 11 *
3 Carl Lewis   United States 100 m / 200 m / 4 × 100 m relay / Long jump 1983 1993 8 1 1 10
4 Michael Johnson   United States 200 m / 400 m / 4 × 400 m relay 1991 1999 8 - - 8
5 Mo Farah   Great Britain 5000 m / 10,000 m 2011 2017 6 2 - 8
6 Sergey Bubka   Soviet Union
  Ukraine
Pole vault 1983 1997 6 - - 6
7 Jeremy Wariner   United States 400 m / 4 × 400 m relay 2005 2009 5 1 - 6
8 Kenenisa Bekele   Ethiopia 5000 m / 10,000 m 2003 2009 5 - 1 6
Lars Riedel   Germany Discus throw 1991 2001 5 - 1 6
10 Maurice Greene   United States 100 m / 200 m / 4 × 100 m relay 1997 2001 5 - - 5

* including one medal in the relay event in which he participated in the heats only

Individual eventsEdit

Rank Athlete Country Events From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Usain Bolt   Jamaica 100 m / 200 m 2007 2017 7 1 1 9
2 Mo Farah   Great Britain 5000 m / 10,000 m 2011 2017 6 2 - 8
3 Sergey Bubka   Soviet Union
  Ukraine
Pole vault 1983 1997 6 - - 6
Michael Johnson   United States 200 m / 400 m 1991 1999 6 - - 6
5 Carl Lewis   United States 100 m / 200 m / Long jump 1983 1993 5 1 1 7
6 Kenenisa Bekele   Ethiopia 5000 m / 10,000 m 2003 2009 5 - 1 6
Lars Riedel   Germany Discus throw 1991 2001 5 - 1 6
8 Ezekiel Kemboi   Kenya 3000 m steeplechase 2003 2015 4 3 - 7
9 Haile Gebrselassie   Ethiopia 5000 m / 10,000 m 1993 2003 4 2 1 7
10 Hicham El Guerrouj   Morocco 1500 m / 5000 m 1995 2003 4 2 - 6

WomenEdit

All eventsEdit

Rank Athlete Country Events From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Allyson Felix   United States 200 m / 400 m / 4 × 100 m relay / 4 × 400 m relay 2005 2017 11 3 2 16
2 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce   Jamaica 100 m / 200 m / 4 × 100 m relay 2007 2015 7 * 2 * - * 9 *
3 Gail Devers   United States 100 m / 100 m hurdles / 4 × 100 m relay 1991 2001 5 3 - 8
4 Sanya Richards-Ross   United States 400 m / 4 × 400 m relay 2003 2015 5 2 - 7
5 Tirunesh Dibaba   Ethiopia 5000 m / 10,000 m 2003 2017 5 1 - 6
Natasha Hastings   United States 4 × 400 m relay 2007 2017 **** 5 **** 1 - **** 6 ****
7 Jearl Miles Clark   United States 400 m / 4 × 400 m relay 1993 2003 4 3 2 9
8 Valerie Adams (Vili)   New Zealand Shot put 2005 2013 4 1 - 5
Vivian Cheruiyot   Kenya 5000 m / 10,000 m 2007 2015 4 1 - 5
10 Jackie Joyner-Kersee   United States Heptathlon / Long jump 1987 1993 4 - - 4
Brittney Reese   United States Long jump 2009 2017 4 - - 4

* including one medal in the relay event in which she participated in the heats only
**** including four medals in the relay events in which she participated in the heats only

Individual eventsEdit

Rank Athlete Country Events From To Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Tirunesh Dibaba   Ethiopia 5000 m / 10,000 m 2003 2017 5 1 - 6
2 Gail Devers   United States 100 m / 100 m hurdles 1991 2001 4 2 - 6
3 Allyson Felix   United States 200 m / 400 m 2005 2017 4 1 2 7
4 Valerie Adams (Vili)   New Zealand Shot put 2005 2013 4 1 - 5
Vivian Cheruiyot   Kenya 5000 m / 10,000 m 2007 2015 4 1 - 5
6 Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce   Jamaica 100 m / 200 m 2009 2015 4 - - 4
Jackie Joyner-Kersee   United States Heptathlon / Long jump 1987 1993 4 - - 4
Brittney Reese   United States Long jump 2009 2017 4 - - 4
9 Tatyana Lebedeva   Russia Triple jump / Long jump 2001 2009 3 2 - 5
10 Maria Mutola   Mozambique 800 m 1993 2003 3 1 1 5

Athletes with most appearancesEdit

There are 53 athletes that have competed in at least eight editions.[8]

App. Name Country Years contested Events
12 Jesús Ángel García Bragado   Spain 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 15 50 km walk
11 Susana Feitor   Portugal 91, 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11 10 km walk / 20 km walk
10 Franka Dietzsch   Germany 91, 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09 Discus throw
Nicoleta Grasu   Romania 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13 Discus throw
Virgilijus Alekna   Lithuania 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13 Discus throw
Kim Collins   Saint Kitts and Nevis 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 15 100 m / 200 m / 4x100 m
João Vieira   Portugal 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 15, 17 20 km walk / 50 km walk
9 Laverne Eve   Bahamas 87, 91, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07 Javelin throw
Tim Berrett   Canada 91, 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07 20 km walk / 50 km walk
Jackie Edwards   Bahamas 91, 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07 Long Jump / Triple Jump
Maria Mutola   Mozambique 91, 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07 800 m
Elisângela Adriano   Brazil 91, 93, 97, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11 Shot put / Discus throw
Venelina Veneva   Bulgaria 91, 95, 99, 01, 03, 05, 09, 11, 15 High Jump
Danny McFarlane   Jamaica 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09 400 m / 400 m hurdles / 4x400 m
Hatem Ghoula   Tunisia 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 13 20 km walk
Debbie Ferguson-McKenzie   Bahamas 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 07, 09, 11, 13 100 m / 200 m / 4x100 m
Nicola Vizzoni   Italy 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13 Hammer throw
Chris Brown   Bahamas 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 15 400 m / 4x400 m
Zhang Wenxiu   China 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 15, 17 Hammer throw
8 Merlene Ottey   Jamaica /   Slovenia 83, 87, 91, 93, 95, 97, 03, 07 100 m / 200 m / 4x100 m
Jan Železný   Czechoslovakia /   Czech Republic 87, 91, 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03 Javelin throw
Yelena Nikolayeva   Soviet Union /   Russia 87, 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05 10 km walk / 20 km walk
Fiona May   Great Britain /   Italy 91, 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05 Long Jump
Beverly McDonald   Jamaica 91, 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05 100 m / 200 m / 4x100 m
Lars Riedel   Germany 91, 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05 Discus throw
Dragutin Topić   SFR Yugoslavia / IWP * /   FR Yugoslavia /
  Serbia and Montenegro /   Serbia
91, 93, 95, 97, 99, 05, 07, 09 High Jump
Iryna Yatchenko   Soviet Union /   Belarus 91, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 07, 09 Discus throw
Eunice Barber   Sierra Leone /   France 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07 Heptathlon / Long Jump / 100 m hurdles
Kevin Sullivan   Canada 93, 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07 1500 m
Manuel Martínez   Spain 93, 95, 97, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09 Shot put
Steffi Nerius   Germany 93, 95, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09 Javelin throw
Amy Acuff   United States 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09 High Jump
Chandra Sturrup   Bahamas 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09 100 m / 200 m / 4x100 m
Aleksander Tammert   Estonia 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09 Discus throw
María Vasco   Spain 95, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11 10 km walk / 20 km walk
Koji Murofushi   Japan 95, 97, 99, 01, 03, 07, 11, 13 Hammer throw
Szymon Ziółkowski   Poland 95, 99, 01, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13 Hammer throw
Marlon Devonish   Great Britain 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11 100 m / 200 m / 4x100 m
Nadine Kleinert   Germany 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11 Shot put
Sergey Makarov   Russia 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11 Javelin throw
Ēriks Rags   Latvia 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11 Javelin throw
Roman Šebrle   Czech Republic 97, 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11 Decathlon
Omar Zepeda   Mexico 97, 01, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 17 20 km walk / 50 km walk
Mario Pestano   Spain 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13 Discus throw
Félix Sánchez   Dominican Republic 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13 400 m hurdles / 4x400 m
Bouabdellah Tahri   France 99, 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13 1500 m / 3000 m steeplechase
Inês Henriques   Portugal 01, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 15, 17 20 km walk / 50 km walk
Zoltán Kővágó   Hungary 01, 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 15, 17 Discus throw
Ruth Beitia   Spain 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 15, 17 High Jump
Allyson Felix   United States 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 15, 17 200 m / 400 m / 4x100 m / 4x400 m
Gerd Kanter   Estonia 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 15, 17 Discus throw
Ezekiel Kemboi   Kenya 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 15, 17 3000 m steeplechase
Bat-Ochiryn Ser-Od   Mongolia 03, 05, 07, 09, 11, 13, 15, 17 Marathon

* At the 1993 World Championships in Athletics in Stuttgart, Germany, Dragutin Topić completed as Individual World Championship Participant (IWP) as Athletic Federation of Yugoslavia was suspended by IAAF due to United Nations sanctions stemming from the Yugoslav wars.

World recordsEdit

A total of 29 world records have been set or equalled at the competition, 17 by men and 12 by women.

The first world record to be set at the World Championships was by Jarmila Kratochvílová of Czechoslovakia, who ran 47.99 seconds to win the women's 400 m final.

A peak of five world records came at the 1993 World Championships in Athletics. The most recent world record was in the women's 50 kilometres race walk, which Portugal's Inês Henriques finished in 4:05:56 in 2017. World records have become less common as the history of the event has expanded, with no world records set in the 1997, 2001, 2007 and 2013 editions.

American athletes have been the most successful with ten world records set by that nation in total, followed by Jamaica and Great Britain on four each. Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt has broken the most world records at the competition, at four, one more than American Carl Lewis. Jonathan Edwards holds the distinction of breaking the world record twice in one championships – improving upon his own newly-set world record in the 1995 men's triple jump final. The men's 4 × 100 metres relay has yielded the most world records, with five set between 1983 and 2011.

Ben Johnson's time of 9.83 seconds at the 1987 World Championships men's 100 m final was initially considered a world record, but this was later rescinded after Johnson admitted to steroid use between 1981 and 1988.

Also, a doping disqualification has led to a performance being retrospectively recognised as a world record: the 2009 Jamaican men's 4 × 100 metres relay team time of 37.31 seconds was taken as the world record after the team's time of 37.10 at the 2008 Beijing Olympics was rescinded due to the disqualification of Nesta Carter (not present in the World Championships team).

Sex Event Record Athlete Nation Date Year
Men 4 × 100 metres relay 37.86 Emmit King
Willie Gault
Calvin Smith
Carl Lewis
  United States (USA) 10 August 1983
Women 400 metres 47.99 Jarmila Kratochvílová   Czechoslovakia (TCH) 10 August 1983
Women High jump 2.09 m Stefka Kostadinova   Bulgaria (BUL) 30 August 1987
Men 100 metres 9.86 Carl Lewis   United States (USA) 25 August 1991
Men Long jump 8.95 m Mike Powell   United States (USA) 30 August 1991
Men 4 × 100 metres relay 37.50 Andre Cason
Leroy Burrell
Dennis Mitchell
Carl Lewis
  United States (USA) 1 September 1991
Men 110 metres hurdles 12.91 Colin Jackson   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 20 August 1993
Men 4 × 100 metres relay 37.40 Jon Drummond
Andre Cason
Dennis Mitchell
Leroy Burrell
  United States (USA) 21 August 1993
Men 4 × 400 metres relay 2:54.29 Andrew Valmon
Quincy Watts
Butch Reynolds
Michael Johnson
  United States (USA) 22 August 1993
Women 400 metres hurdles 52.74 Sally Gunnell   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 19 August 1993
Women Triple jump 15.09 m Anna Biryukova   Russia (RUS) 21 August 1993
Men Triple jump 18.16 m Jonathan Edwards   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 7 August 1995
Men Triple jump 18.29 m Jonathan Edwards   Great Britain & N.I. (GBR) 7 August 1995
Women 400 metres hurdles 52.61 Kim Batten   United States (USA) 11 August 1995
Women Triple jump 15.50 m Inessa Kravets   Ukraine (UKR) 10 August 1995
Men 400 metres 43.18 Michael Johnson   United States (USA) 26 August 1999
Women Pole vault 4.60 m Stacy Dragila   United States (USA) 21 August 1999
Men 20 kilometres race walk 1:17:21 Jefferson Pérez   Ecuador (ECU) 23 August 2003
Men 50 kilometres race walk 3:36:03 Robert Korzeniowski   Poland (POL) 27 August 2003
Women Pole vault 5.01 m Yelena Isinbaeva   Russia (RUS) 12 August 2005
Women Javelin throw 71.70 m Osleidys Menéndez   Cuba (CUB) 14 August 2005
Women 20 kilometres walk 1:25:41 Olimpiada Ivanova   Russia (RUS) 7 August 2005
Men 100 metres 9.58 Usain Bolt   Jamaica (JAM) 16 August 2009
Men 200 metres 19.19 Usain Bolt   Jamaica (JAM) 20 August 2009
Men 4 × 100 metres relay 37.31 Steve Mullings
Michael Frater
Usain Bolt
Asafa Powell
  Jamaica (JAM) 22 August 2009
Women Hammer throw 77.96 m Anita Włodarczyk   Poland (POL) 22 August 2009
Men 4 × 100 metres relay 37.04 Nesta Carter
Michael Frater
Yohan Blake
Usain Bolt
  Jamaica (JAM) 4 September 2011
Men Decathlon 9045 pts Ashton Eaton   United States (USA) 29 August 2015
Women 50 kilometres race walk 4:05:56 Inês Henriques   Portugal (POR) 13 August 2017

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ Matthews, Peter (2012). Historical Dictionary of Track and Field (pg. 217). Scarecrow Press (eBook). Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  2. ^ IAAF Statistics Book Moscow 2013 (pg. 179). IAAF/AFTS (2013). Edited by Mark Butler. Retrieved on 2013-09-09.
  3. ^ IAAF World Championships in Athletics. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  4. ^ Archive of Past Events. IAAF. Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  5. ^ "First World Outdoor Championships in Helsinki a landmark for track & field." Usatf.org. Retrieved 2012-07-23.
  6. ^ https://www.iaaf.org/competitions/iaaf-world-championships/iaaf-world-championships-london-2017-5151/medaltable
  7. ^ "IAAF Statistics Book – IAAF World Championships London 2017" (PDF). iaaf.org. p. 51. Retrieved 15 August 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c Statistics book, Moscow 2013
  9. ^ "IAAF: Usain BOLT - Profile". iaaf.org. 

External linksEdit