Decathlon

  (Redirected from Decathlete)

The decathlon is a combined event in athletics consisting of ten track and field events. The word "decathlon" was formed, in analogy to the word "pentathlon", from Greek δέκα (déka, meaning "ten") and ἄθλος (áthlos, or ἄθλον, áthlon, meaning "contest" or “prize”). Events are held over two consecutive days and the winners are determined by the combined performance in all. Performance is judged on a points system in each event, not by the position achieved.[1] The decathlon is contested mainly by male athletes, while female athletes typically compete in the heptathlon.

Athletics
Decathlon
Decathlon combines four runs, three jumps and three throws.
World records
MenFrance Kevin Mayer 9126 pts (2018)
Olympic records
MenCzech Republic Roman Šebrle 8893 pts (2004)
United States Ashton Eaton 8893 pts (2016)
World Championship records
MenUnited States Ashton Eaton 9045 pts (2015)

Traditionally, the title of "World's Greatest Athlete" has been given to the person who wins the decathlon. This began when King Gustav V of Sweden told Jim Thorpe, "Sir, you are the world's greatest athlete" after Thorpe won the decathlon at the Stockholm Olympics in 1912.[2]

The event is similar to the pentathlon held at the ancient Greek Olympics,[3] and also similar to a competition called an "all-around", which was contested at the United States amateur championships in 1884.[4][5] Another all-around was held at the 1904 Summer Olympics.[6] The modern decathlon first appeared at the 1912 Games.[7]

The current official decathlon world record holder is Frenchman Kevin Mayer, who scored a total of 9,126 points at the 2018 Décastar in France.

Historical backgroundEdit

The decathlon developed from the ancient pentathlon competitions held at the ancient Greek Olympics. Pentathlons involved five disciplines – long jump, discus throw, javelin throw, sprint and a wrestling match.[3] Introduced in Olympia during 708 BC, the competition was extremely popular for many centuries. By the sixth century BC, pentathlons had become part of religious games.[citation needed]

A ten-event competition known as the "all-around" or "all-round" championship, similar to the modern decathlon, was first contested at the United States amateur championships in 1884 and reached a consistent form by 1890;[4][5] an all-around was held at the 1904 Summer Olympics, though whether it was an official Olympic event has been disputed.[6] The modern decathlon first appeared on the Olympic athletics program at the 1912 Games in Stockholm.[7]

FormatEdit

Men's decathlonEdit

The vast majority of international and top level men's decathlons are divided into a two-day competition, with the track and field events held in the order below. Traditionally, all decathletes who finish the event, rather than just the winner or medal winning athletes, do a round of honour together after the competition.[citation needed] The current world record holder is Kevin Mayer from France with 9126 points which he set on September 16, 2018 in Talence, France.

Women's decathlonEdit

At major championships, the women's equivalent of the decathlon is the seven-event heptathlon; prior to 1981 it was the five-event pentathlon.[8] However, in 2001, the IAAF approved scoring tables for a women's decathlon; the current world record holder is Austra Skujytė of Lithuania, with 8,366.[9] Women's disciplines differ from men's in the same way as for standalone events: the shot, discus and javelin weigh less, and the sprint hurdles uses lower hurdles over 100 m rather than 110 m. The points tables used are the same as for the heptathlon in the shared events. The schedule of events differs from the men's decathlon, with the field events switched between day one and day two; this is to avoid scheduling conflicts when men's and women's decathlon competitions take place simultaneously.[10]

One hourEdit

The one-hour decathlon is a special type of decathlon in which the athletes have to start the last of ten events (1500 m) within sixty minutes of the start of the first event. The world record holder is Czech decathlete Robert Změlík, who achieved 7,897 points at a meeting in Ostrava, Czechoslovakia, in 1992.[citation needed]

Masters athleticsEdit

In Masters athletics, performance scores are age graded before being applied to the standard scoring table. This way, marks that would be competitive within an age division can get rated, even if those marks would not appear on the scale designed for younger age groups. Additionally, like women, the age divisions use different implement weights and lower hurdles. Based on this system, German Rolf Geese in the M60 division and American Robert Hewitt in the M80 divisions have set their respective world records over 8,000 points. Using the same scale, Nadine O'Connor scored 10,234 points in the W65 division, the highest decathlon score ever recorded.[11][12]

Points systemEdit

Event A B C
100 m 25.4347 18 1.81
Long jump 0.14354 220 1.4
Shot put 51.39 1.5 1.05
High jump 0.8465 75 1.42
400 m 1.53775 82 1.81
110 m hurdles 5.74352 28.5 1.92
Discus throw 12.91 4 1.1
Pole vault 0.2797 100 1.35
Javelin throw 10.14 7 1.08
1500 m 0.03768 480 1.85

The 2001 IAAF points tables use the following formulae:[13]

  • Points = INT(A(BP)C) for track events (faster time produces a higher score)
  • Points = INT(A(PB)C) for field events (greater distance or height produces a higher score)

A, B and C are parameters that vary by discipline, as shown in the table on the right, while P is the performance by the athlete, measured in seconds (running), metres (throwing), or centimetres (jumping).[13]

The decathlon tables should not be confused with the scoring tables compiled by Bojidar Spiriev, to allow comparison of the relative quality of performances by athletes in different events. On those tables, for example, a decathlon score of 9,006 points equates to 1,265 "comparison points", the same number as a triple jump of 18 m.[14]

BenchmarksEdit

Split evenly between the events, the following table shows the benchmark levels needed to earn 1,000, 900, 800 and 700 points in each sport.

Event 1,000 pts 900 pts 800 pts 700 pts Unit
100 m 10.395 10.827 11.278 11.756 Seconds
Long jump 7.76 7.36 6.94 6.51 Metres
Shot put 18.40 16.79 15.16 13.53 Metres
High jump 2.20 2.10 1.99 1.88 Metres
400 m 46.17 48.19 50.32 52.58 Seconds
110 m hurdles 13.80 14.59 15.419 16.29 Seconds
Discus throw 56.17 51.4 46.59 41.72 Metres
Pole vault 5.28 4.96 4.63 4.29 Metres
Javelin throw 77.19 70.67 64.09 57.45 Metres
1500 m 3:53.79 4:07.42 4:21.77 4:36.96 Minutes:Seconds

RecordsEdit

The official decathlon world record holder is Kevin Mayer of France, with a score of 9,126 points set during the 2018 Décastar in Talence, France, which was ratified by the IAAF.

100m (wind) Long jump (wind) Shot put High jump 400m 110H (wind) Discus Pole vault Javelin 1500m
10.55 (+0.3 m/s) 7.80 m (+1.2 m/s) 16.00 m 2.05 m 48.42 13.75 (-1.1 m/s) 50.54 m 5.45 m 71.90 m 4:36.11

Previous record from Ashton Eaton (9,045):

100m (wind) Long jump (wind) Shot put High jump 400m 110H (wind) Discus Pole vault Javelin 1500m
10.23 (-0.4 m/s) 7.88 m (+0.0 m/s) 14.52 m 2.01 m 45.00 WDB 13.69 (-0.2 m/s) 43.34 m 5.20 m 63.63 m 4:17.52
Record Score Athlete Year
World 9,126   Kevin Mayer (FRA) 2018
Continental records
Africa 8,521   Larbi Bourrada (ALG) 2016
Asia 8,725   Dmitriy Karpov (KAZ) 2004
Europe 9,126   Kevin Mayer (FRA) 2018
North, Central America
and Caribbean
9,045   Ashton Eaton (USA) 2015
Oceania 8,492   Ashley Moloney (AUS) 2020
South America 8,393   Carlos Chinin (BRA) 2013

Decathlon bestsEdit

The total decathlon score for all world records in the respective events would be 12,568. The total decathlon score for all the best performances achieved during decathlons is 10,544. The Difference column shows the difference in points between the decathlon points that the individual current world record would be awarded and the points awarded to the current decathlon record for that event. The % Difference column shows the percentage difference between the time, distance or height of the individual world record and the decathlon record (other than the Total entry, which shows the percentage difference between awarded decathlon points). The relative differences in points are much higher in throwing events than in running and jumping events.

Decathlon bests are only recognized when an athlete completes the ten-event competition with a score over 7,000 points.[15]

World records (WR) compared to decathlon bests (DB)
Event Type Athlete Record Score Difference % Difference Date Place Ref
100 m
WR   Usain Bolt (JAM) 9.58 s 1,202 136 5.64 August 16, 2009 Berlin
DB   Damian Warner (CAN) 10.12 s 1,066 May 25, 2019 Götzis [16]
Long jump
WR   Mike Powell (USA) 8.95 m 1,312 192 8.04 August 30, 1991 Tokyo
DB   Ashton Eaton (USA) 8.23 m 1,120 June 22, 2012 Eugene [17]
Shot put
WR   Randy Barnes (USA) 23.12 m 1,295 247 17.08 May 20, 1990 Westwood
DB   Edy Hubacher (SUI) 19.17 m 1,048 October 5, 1969 Bern
High jump
WR   Javier Sotomayor (CUB) 2.45 m 1,244 183 7.35 July 27, 1993 Salamanca
DB   Rolf Beilschmidt (GDR) &
  Christian Schenk (GDR)
2.27 m 1,061 October 1, 1977
September 28, 1988
Jena
Seoul
pending   Derek Drouin (CAN) 2.28 m 1,071 173 April 7, 2017 Montecito [18]
400 m
WR   Wayde van Niekerk (RSA) 43.03 s 1,164 104 4.48 August 14, 2016 Rio de Janeiro [19]
DB   Ashton Eaton (USA) 45.00 s 1,060 August 28, 2015 Beijing [20]
110 m hurdles
WR   Aries Merritt (USA) 12.80 s 1,135 87 5.00 September 7, 2012 Brussels
DB   Damian Warner (CAN) 13.44 s 1,048 July 23, 2015 Toronto [21]
Discus throw
WR   Jürgen Schult (GDR) 74.08 m 1,383 390 24.58 June 6, 1986 Neubrandenburg
DB   Bryan Clay (USA) 55.87 m 993 June 24, 2005 Carson
Pole vault
WR   Armand Duplantis (SWE) 6.18 m 1,291 139 7.29 February 15, 2020 Glasgow
DB   Tim Lobinger (GER) 5.76 m 1,152 September 16, 1999 Leverkusen
Javelin throw
WR   Jan Železný (CZE) 98.48 m 1,331 291 18.96 May 25, 1996 Jena
DB   Peter Blank (GER) 79.80 m 1,040 July 19, 1992 Emmelshausen
1500 m
WR   Hicham El Guerrouj (MAR) 3:26.00 min:s 1,218 255 15.87 July 14, 1998 Rome
DB   Robert Baker (USA) 3:58.7 min:s 963 April 3, 1980 Austin
Total World records 12,575 2,031 16.15
Decathlon bests 10,544

All-time top 25Edit

MenEdit

  • Correct as of October 2019.[22]
Rank Score Athlete Date Place Ref
1 9,126   Kevin Mayer (FRA) September 15–16, 2018 Talence [23]
2 9,045   Ashton Eaton (USA) August 28–29, 2015 Beijing
3 9,026   Roman Šebrle (CZE) May 26–27, 2001 Götzis
4 8,994   Tomáš Dvořák (CZE) July 3–4, 1999 Prague
5 8,891   Dan O'Brien (USA) September 4–5, 1992 Talence
6 8,847   Daley Thompson (GBR) August 8–9, 1984 Los Angeles
7 8,832   Jürgen Hingsen (FRG) June 8–9, 1984 Mannheim
  Bryan Clay (USA) June 29–30, 2008 Eugene
9 8,815   Erki Nool (EST) August 6–7, 2001 Edmonton
10 8,795   Damian Warner (CAN) May 26–27, 2018 Götzis [24]
11 8,792   Uwe Freimuth (GDR) July 20–21, 1984 Potsdam
12 8,790   Trey Hardee (USA) August 19–20, 2009 Berlin
13 8,784   Tom Pappas (USA) June 21–22, 2003 Palo Alto
14 8,762   Siegfried Wentz (FRG) June 4–5, 1983 Filderstadt-Bernhausen
15 8,735   Eduard Hämäläinen (BLR) May 28–29, 1994 Götzis
16 8,727   Dave Johnson (USA) April 23–24, 1992 Azusa
17 8,725   Dmitriy Karpov (KAZ) August 23–24, 2004 Athens
18 8,709   Aleksandr Apaychev (URS) June 2–3, 1984 Neubrandenburg
19 8,706   Frank Busemann (GER) July 31 – August 1, 1996 Atlanta
20 8,698   Grigoriy Degtyaryev (URS) June 21–22, 1984 Kyiv
21 8,694   Chris Huffins (USA) June 19–20, 1998 New Orleans
22 8,691   Niklas Kaul (GER) October 2–3, 2019 Doha [25]
23 8,680   Torsten Voss (GDR) September 3–4, 1987 Rome
24 8,670   Michael Schrader (GER) August 10–11, 2013 Moscow
25 8,667   Guido Kratschmer (FRG) June 13–14, 1980 Filderstadt-Bernhausen

NotesEdit

Below is a list of other scores equal or superior to 8768 pts:

WomenEdit

  • Correct as of September 2020.
Rank Score Athlete Date Place Ref
1 8,358   Austra Skujytė (LTU) 14–15 April 2005 Columbia
2 8,150   Marie Collonvillé (FRA) 25–26 September 2004 Talence
3 7,921   Jordan Gray (USA) 22–23 June 2019 San Mateo [26]
4 7,885   Mona Steigauf (GER) 1997 [27]
5 7,798   Irina Karpova (KAZ) 25–26 September 2004 Talence
6 7,742[a]   Anna Snetkova (RUS) 14–15 September 2003 Sochi [28]
7 7,577   Tiffany Lott-Hogan (USA) 2000 [29]
8 7,470[b]   Julie Mezerette (FRA) 2001 [30]
9 7,358   Julie Martin (FRA) 25–26 September 2004 Talence
10 7,064   Breanna Eveland (USA) 13–14 April 2006 Columbia
11 6,878   Jessica Taylor (GBR) 12–13 September 2015 Erith [31]
12 6,830   Marion Obermayr (AUS) 4–5 May 2002 Linz [32]
13 6,749   Barbora Špotáková (CZE) 25–26 September 2004 Talence
14 6,709   Marie-Cécile Crancé (FRA) 25–26 September 2004 Talence
15 6,641   Lindsay Grigoriev (USA) 14–15 April 2005 Columbia
16 6,614   María Peinado (ESP) 22–23 October 2005 Castellón
17 6,599   Sara Tani (ITA) 21–22 October 2006 Udine [33]
18 6,577   Cassandre Evans (BEL) 28–29 September 2019 Schaarbeek [34]
19 6,570   Andrea Bordalejo (ARG) 27–28 November 2004 Rosario [35]
20 6,338   Marianne Schlachter (GER) 13–14 April 2006 Columbia [36]
21 6,330   AnnaLee McGregor (USA) 22–23 June 2019 San Mateo [37]
22 6,296   Ada Salgarella (ITA) 21–22 October 2006 Udine [38]
23 6,202   Amy Backel (USA) 22–23 June 2019 San Mateo [39]

NotesEdit

Below is a list of other scores equal or superior to 8000 pts:

CompetitionsEdit

Olympic medalistsEdit

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1912 Stockholm
details
Jim Thorpe
  United States
Charles Lomberg
  Sweden
Gösta Holmér
  Sweden
Hugo Wieslander
  Sweden
1920 Antwerp
details
Helge Løvland
  Norway
Brutus Hamilton
  United States
Bertil Ohlson
  Sweden
1924 Paris
details
Harold Osborn
  United States
Emerson Norton
  United States
Aleksander Klumberg
  Estonia
1928 Amsterdam
details
Paavo Yrjölä
  Finland
Akilles Järvinen
  Finland
Ken Doherty
  United States
1932 Los Angeles
details
Jim Bausch
  United States
Akilles Järvinen
  Finland
Wolrad Eberle
  Germany
1936 Berlin
details
Glenn Morris
  United States
Bob Clark
  United States
Jack Parker
  United States
1948 London
details
Bob Mathias
  United States
Ignace Heinrich
  France
Floyd Simmons
  United States
1952 Helsinki
details
Bob Mathias
  United States
Milt Campbell
  United States
Floyd Simmons
  United States
1956 Melbourne
details
Milt Campbell
  United States
Rafer Johnson
  United States
Vasili Kuznetsov
  Soviet Union
1960 Rome
details
Rafer Johnson
  United States
Yang Chuan-kwang
  Republic of China
Vasili Kuznetsov
  Soviet Union
1964 Tokyo
details
Willi Holdorf
  United Team of Germany
Rein Aun
  Soviet Union
Hans-Joachim Walde
  United Team of Germany
1968 Mexico City
details
Bill Toomey
  United States
Hans-Joachim Walde
  West Germany
Kurt Bendlin
  West Germany
1972 Munich
details
Mykola Avilov
  Soviet Union
Leonid Lytvynenko
  Soviet Union
Ryszard Katus
  Poland
1976 Montreal
details
Bruce Jenner
  United States[c]
Guido Kratschmer
  West Germany
Mykola Avilov
  Soviet Union
1980 Moscow
details
Daley Thompson
  Great Britain
Yuriy Kutsenko
  Soviet Union
Sergei Zhelanov
  Soviet Union
1984 Los Angeles
details
Daley Thompson
  Great Britain
Jürgen Hingsen
  West Germany
Siegfried Wentz
  West Germany
1988 Seoul
details
Christian Schenk
  East Germany
Torsten Voss
  East Germany
Dave Steen
  Canada
1992 Barcelona
details
Robert Změlík
  Czechoslovakia
Antonio Peñalver
  Spain
Dave Johnson
  United States
1996 Atlanta
details
Dan O'Brien
  United States
Frank Busemann
  Germany
Tomáš Dvořák
  Czech Republic
2000 Sydney
details
Erki Nool
  Estonia
Roman Šebrle
  Czech Republic
Chris Huffins
  United States
2004 Athens
details
Roman Šebrle
  Czech Republic
Bryan Clay
  United States
Dmitriy Karpov
  Kazakhstan
2008 Beijing
details
Bryan Clay
  United States
Andrei Krauchanka
  Belarus
Leonel Suárez
  Cuba
2012 London
details
Ashton Eaton
  United States
Trey Hardee
  United States
Leonel Suárez
  Cuba
2016 Rio De Janeiro
details
Ashton Eaton
  United States
Kevin Mayer
  France
Damian Warner
  Canada

World Championships medalistsEdit

Championships Gold Silver Bronze
1983 Helsinki
details
  Daley Thompson (GBR)   Jürgen Hingsen (FRG)   Siegfried Wentz (FRG)
1987 Rome
details
  Torsten Voss (GDR)   Siegfried Wentz (FRG)   Pavel Tarnavetskiy (URS)
1991 Tokyo
details
  Dan O'Brien (USA)   Mike Smith (CAN)   Christian Schenk (GER)
1993 Stuttgart
details
  Dan O'Brien (USA)   Eduard Hämäläinen (BLR)   Paul Meier (GER)
1995 Gothenburg
details
  Dan O'Brien (USA)   Eduard Hämäläinen (BLR)   Mike Smith (CAN)
1997 Athens
details
  Tomáš Dvořák (CZE)   Eduard Hämäläinen (FIN)   Frank Busemann (GER)
1999 Seville
details
  Tomáš Dvořák (CZE)   Dean Macey (GBR)   Chris Huffins (USA)
2001 Edmonton
details
  Tomáš Dvořák (CZE)   Erki Nool (EST)   Dean Macey (GBR)
2003 Saint-Denis
details
  Tom Pappas (USA)   Roman Šebrle (CZE)   Dmitriy Karpov (KAZ)
2005 Helsinki
details
  Bryan Clay (USA)   Roman Šebrle (CZE)   Attila Zsivoczky (HUN)
2007 Osaka
details
  Roman Šebrle (CZE)   Maurice Smith (JAM)   Dmitriy Karpov (KAZ)
2009 Berlin
details
  Trey Hardee (USA)   Leonel Suárez (CUB)   Aleksandr Pogorelov (RUS)
2011 Daegu
details
  Trey Hardee (USA)   Ashton Eaton (USA)   Leonel Suárez (CUB)
2013 Moscow
details
  Ashton Eaton (USA)   Michael Schrader (GER)   Damian Warner (CAN)
2015 Beijing
details
  Ashton Eaton (USA)   Damian Warner (CAN)   Rico Freimuth (GER)
2017 London
details
  Kévin Mayer (FRA)   Rico Freimuth (GER)   Kai Kazmirek (GER)
2019 Doha
details
  Niklas Kaul (GER)   Maicel Uibo (EST)   Damian Warner (CAN)

Continental competitionsEdit

OtherEdit

Season's bestsEdit

[citation needed]

Year Score Athlete Place
1960 8,683   Rafer Johnson (USA) Eugene
1961 8,709   Philip Mulkey (USA) Memphis
1962 8,248   Chuan-Kwang Yang (ROC) Tulare
1963 8,089   Chuan-Kwang Yang (ROC) Walnut
1964 7,950   Manfred Bock (FRG) Liestal
1965 7,883   Mykhaylo Storozhenko (URS) Kiev
1966 8,234   Bill Toomey (USA) Salina
1967 8,319   Kurt Bendlin (FRG) Heidelberg
1968 8,222 A   Bill Toomey (USA) Echo Summit
1969 8,417   Bill Toomey (USA) Los Angeles
1970 8,130   Rüdiger Demmig (GDR) Erfurt
1971 8,244   Kurt Bendlin (FRG) Bonn
1972 8,466   Mykola Avilov (URS) Munich
1973 8,163   Lennart Hedmark (SWE) Bonn
1974 8,229   Ryszard Skowronek (POL) Montreal
1975 8,429   Bruce Jenner (USA) Eugene
1976 8,634   Bruce Jenner (USA) Montreal
1977 8,400   Aleksandr Grebenyuk (URS) Riga
1978 8,493   Guido Kratschmer (FRG) Bernhausen
1979 8,476   Guido Kratschmer (FRG) Krefeld
1980 8,667   Guido Kratschmer (FRG) Bernhausen
1981 8,334   Rainer Pottel (GDR) Birmingham
1982 8,774   Daley Thompson (GBR) Athens
1983 8,825   Jürgen Hingsen (FRG) Bernhausen
1984 8,847   Daley Thompson (GBR) Los Angeles
1985 8,559   Torsten Voss (GDR) Dresden
1986 8,811   Daley Thompson (GBR) Stuttgart
1987 8,680   Torsten Voss (GDR) Rome
1988 8,512   Christian Plaziat (FRA) Talence
1989 8,549   Dave Johnson (USA) Houston
1990 8,574   Christian Plaziat (FRA) Split
1991 8,812   Dan O'Brien (USA) Tokyo
1992 8,891   Dan O'Brien (USA) Talence
1993 8,817   Dan O'Brien (USA) Stuttgart
1994 8,735   Eduard Hämäläinen (BLR) Götzis
1995 8,695   Dan O'Brien (USA) Gothenburg
1996 8,824   Dan O'Brien (USA) Atlanta
1997 8,837   Tomáš Dvořák (CZE) Athens
1998 8,755   Dan O'Brien (USA) Uniondale
1999 8,994   Tomáš Dvořák (CZE) Prague
2000 8,900   Tomáš Dvořák (CZE) Götzis
2001 9,026   Roman Šebrle (CZE) Götzis
2002 8,800   Roman Šebrle (CZE) Götzis
2003 8,807   Roman Šebrle (CZE) Götzis
2004 8,893   Roman Šebrle (CZE) Athens
2005 8,732   Bryan Clay (USA) Helsinki
2006 8,677   Bryan Clay (USA) Götzis
2007 8,697   Roman Šebrle (CZE) Kladno
2008 8,832   Bryan Clay (USA) Eugene
2009 8,790   Trey Hardee (USA) Berlin
2010 8,483   Bryan Clay (USA) Götzis
2011 8,729   Ashton Eaton (USA) Eugene
2012 9,039   Ashton Eaton (USA) Eugene
2013 8,809   Ashton Eaton (USA) Moscow
2014 8,616   Andrei Krauchanka (BLR) Zürich
2015 9,045   Ashton Eaton (USA) Beijing
2016 8,893   Ashton Eaton (USA) Rio de Janeiro
2017 8,768   Kevin Mayer (FRA) London
2018 9,126   Kevin Mayer (FRA) Talence
2019 8,711   Damian Warner (CAN) Götzis
2020 8,552   Kevin Mayer (FRA) Saint-Paul

National recordsEdit

  • Updated 25 December 2020.[22]

NR's equal or superior to 8,000 pts:

Score Nation Athlete Date Place
9,126   France Kevin Mayer September 15–16, 2018 Talence
9,045   United States Ashton Eaton August 28–29, 2015 Beijing
9,026   Czech Republic Roman Šebrle April 26–27, 2001 Götzis
8,847   United Kingdom Daley Thompson August 8–9, 1984 Los Angeles
8,832   Germany Jürgen Hingsen June 8–9, 1984 Mannheim
8,815   Estonia Erki Nool August 6–7, 2001 Edmonton
8,795   Canada Damian Warner May 26–27, 2018 Götzis
8,735   Belarus Eduard Hämäläinen May 28–29, 1994 Götzis
8,730   Finland August 5–6, 1997 Athens
8,725   Kazakhstan Dmitriy Karpov August 23–24, 2004 Athens
8,709   Ukraine Aleksandr Apaychev June 2–3, 1984 Neubrandenburg
8,698   Russia Grigoriy Degtyaryev June 21–22, 1984 Kyiv
8,654   Cuba Leonel Suárez July 3–4, 2009 Havana
8,644   Jamaica Maurice Smith August 31 – September 1, 2007 Osaka
8,573   Iceland Jón Arnar Magnússon May 30–31, 1998 Götzis
8,566   Poland Sebastian Chmara May 16–17, 1998 Murcia
8,554   Hungary Attila Zsivoczky June 3–4, 2000 Götzis
8,539   Grenada Lindon Victor May 11–12, 2017 Columbia
8,539   Netherlands Eelco Sintnicolaas May 27–28, 2017 Götzis
8,526   Spain Francisco Javier Benet May 16–17, 1998 Murcia
8,521   Algeria Larbi Bouraada August 17–18, 2016 Rio de Janeiro
8,519   Belgium Hans Van Alphen May 26–27, 2012 Götzis
8,492   Australia Ashley Moloney December 19–20, 2020 Brisbane
8,445   Uzbekistan Ramil Ganiyev August 5–6, 1997 Athens
8,437   Lithuania Rišardas Malachovskis July 1–2, 1988 Minsk
8,406   Sweden Nicklas Wiberg August 19–20, 2009 Berlin
8,398   South Africa Willem Coertzen May 30–31, 2015 Götzis
8,393   Brazil Carlos Chinin June 7–8, 2013 São Paulo
8,359   New Zealand Simon Poelman March 21–22, 1987 Christchurch
8,334    Switzerland Stephan Niklaus July 2–3, 1983 Lausanne
8,320   Austria Gernot Kellermayr May 29–30, 1993 Götzis
8,312   Latvia Edgars Eriņš May 26–27, 2011 Valmiera
8,308   Japan Keisuke Ushiro May 31 – June 1, 2014 Nagano
8,291 A   Argentina Tito Steiner June 22–23, 1983 Provo
8,290   China Qi Haifeng May 28–29, 2005 Götzis
8,288   Moldova Valeriy Kachanov June 20–21, 1980 Moscow
8,275   Serbia Mihail Dudaš August 10–11, 2013 Moscow
8,228   Norway Martin Roe April 27–28, 2018 Florence
8,213   Portugal Mário Aníbal June 30 – July 1, 2001 Kaunas
8,206   Republic of China Yang Chuan-Kwang April 27–28, 1963 Walnut
8,199   Bulgaria Atanas Andonov June 20–21, 1981 Sofia
8,169   Italy Beniamino Poserina October 5–6, 1996 Formia
8,130   Puerto Rico Ayden Owens April 17–18, 2019 Azusa
8,069   Greece Prodromos Korkizoglou July 1–2, 2000 Ibach
8,065   Chile Gonzalo Barroilhet April 19–20, 2012 Charlottesville
8,048   Venezuela Geormi Jaramillo May 4–5, 2018 Barquisimeto
8,023   Tunisia Hamdi Dhouibi August 9–10, 2005 Helsinki

Junior (under-20) Decathlon bestsEdit

Event Record Score Athlete Nation Date Meet Place Age Ref
100 m 10.51 (-0.3 m/s) 973 pts Ashley Moloney   Australia July 10, 2018 World Junior Championships   Tampere, Finland 18 years, 119 days [41]
Long jump
Shot put
(6 kg)
High jump
400 m 46.86 965 pts Ashley Moloney   Australia July 10, 2018 World Junior Championships   Tampere, Finland 18 years, 119 days [42]
110 m hurdles
(0.99 m)
Discus throw
(1.750 kg)
Pole vault
Javelin throw 71.59 m 914 pts Niklas Kaul   Germany July 20, 2016 World Junior Championships   Bydgoszcz, Poland 18 years, 160 days [43]
1500 m
World Junior record 8435 pts Niklas Kaul   Germany July 22–23, 2017 European U20 Championships   Grosseto, Italy 19 years, 162 days [44]
100m (wind) Long jump (wind) Shot put High jump 400m 110H (wind) Discus Pole vault Javelin 1500m
11.48 (-1.3 m/s) 7.20 m (+1.6 m/s) 15.37 m 2.05 m 48.42 14.55 (-0.2 m/s) 48.49 m 4.70 m 68.05 m 4:15.52

Other multiple event contestsEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ wind information missing for formal ranking
  2. ^ wind information missing for formal ranking
  3. ^ Jenner is now known as Caitlyn due to gender transition in 2015.[40]

ReferencesEdit

  • "IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events" (PDF). IAAF. April 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 10, 2008. Retrieved May 9, 2009.
  1. ^ "Decathlon". Encarta. 2008. Archived from the original on 28 October 2009. Retrieved 6 August 2008.
  2. ^ Flatter, Ron. "Thorpe preceded Deion, Bo". espn.com. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  3. ^ a b Waldo E. Sweet, Erich Segal (1987). Sport and recreation in ancient Greece. Oxford University Press. (p37). Retrieved on 7 May 2011.
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  5. ^ a b Zarnowski, Frank (2005). All-around Men: Heroes of a Forgotten Sport. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-5423-9.
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  7. ^ a b "Athletics at the 1912 Stockholm Summer Games: Men's Decathlon". Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on April 17, 2020. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  8. ^ IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events, p. 9.
  9. ^ "Decathlon Records". IAAF. Retrieved May 9, 2009.
  10. ^ IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events, p. 10.
  11. ^ Stone, Ken. "Masters track athlete of the decade?". Masters-athlete.com. Retrieved February 7, 2010.
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 29 November 2014. Retrieved 21 November 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  13. ^ a b IAAF Scoring Tables for Combined Events, p. 24.
  14. ^ IAAF Scoring Tables of Athletics – Outdoor – 2008 Edition Archived 6 February 2009 at the Wayback Machine p. 154.
  15. ^ van Kuijen, Hans (12 September 2013). Eaton and Melnychenko lead Talence fields, Lavillenie to make Decathlon debut – IAAF Combined Events Challenge. IAAF. Retrieved on 12 September 2013.
  16. ^ Gabriella Pieraccini (May 25, 2019). "Johnson-Thompson and Warner reinforce dominance with overnight leads in Götzis". IAAF. Retrieved May 28, 2019.
  17. ^ "Ashton Eaton Breaks Decathlon 100 m and Long Jump World Records". www.oregonlive.com. June 22, 2012. Retrieved June 23, 2012.
  18. ^ "2017 Sam Adams Combined Events Invitational – Men's High Jump Results". phototiming.com. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 9, 2017.
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  21. ^ "110m Hurdles Results" (PDF). results.toronto2015.org. July 23, 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 23, 2015. Retrieved July 25, 2015.
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  26. ^ http://www.rtspt.com/events/usatf/wdec19/190622F001.htm
  27. ^ "JORDAN GRAY SETS AMERICAN RECORD WINNING INITIAL WOMEN'S DECATHLON NATL'S". pausatf.org. June 23, 2019. Archived from the original on October 29, 2020. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  28. ^ "JORDAN GRAY SETS AMERICAN RECORD WINNING INITIAL WOMEN'S DECATHLON NATL'S". pausatf.org. June 23, 2019. Archived from the original on October 29, 2020. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  29. ^ "JORDAN GRAY SETS AMERICAN RECORD WINNING INITIAL WOMEN'S DECATHLON NATL'S". pausatf.org. June 23, 2019. Archived from the original on October 29, 2020. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  30. ^ "JORDAN GRAY SETS AMERICAN RECORD WINNING INITIAL WOMEN'S DECATHLON NATL'S". pausatf.org. June 23, 2019. Archived from the original on October 29, 2020. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  31. ^ "Kent County Multi-Events Championships Complete Results" (PDF). kcaa.org.uk. September 12, 2015. Retrieved September 13, 2015.
  32. ^ Roger Ruth (January 29, 2007). "t-and-f: Women's Decathlon 2006". mail-archive.com. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  33. ^ Roger Ruth (January 29, 2007). "t-and-f: Women's Decathlon 2006". mail-archive.com. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  34. ^ "L'exploit et le record de Belgique battu pour la jeune Cassandra Evans en décathlon : "L'aboutissement de la saison ! "" (in French). DHNET.BE. October 1, 2019. Retrieved October 17, 2020.
  35. ^ Roger Ruth (January 29, 2007). "t-and-f: Women's Decathlon 2006". mail-archive.com. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  36. ^ Roger Ruth (January 29, 2007). "t-and-f: Women's Decathlon 2006". mail-archive.com. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  37. ^ "JORDAN GRAY SETS AMERICAN RECORD WINNING INITIAL WOMEN'S DECATHLON NATL'S". pausatf.org. June 23, 2019. Archived from the original on October 29, 2020. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  38. ^ Roger Ruth (January 29, 2007). "t-and-f: Women's Decathlon 2006". mail-archive.com. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  39. ^ "JORDAN GRAY SETS AMERICAN RECORD WINNING INITIAL WOMEN'S DECATHLON NATL'S". pausatf.org. June 23, 2019. Archived from the original on October 29, 2020. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  40. ^ Buzz Bissinger (June 1, 2015). "Introducing Caitlyn Jenner". Vanity Fair. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  41. ^ "100m Results" (PDF). IAAF. July 10, 2018. Retrieved July 27, 2018.
  42. ^ "400m Results" (PDF). IAAF. July 10, 2018. Retrieved July 27, 2018.
  43. ^ "Decathlon Results" (PDF). IAAF. July 20, 2016. Retrieved July 20, 2016.
  44. ^ "Decathlon Results" (PDF). EA. July 23, 2017. Retrieved July 23, 2017.[permanent dead link]

External linksEdit