The 1010s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1010, and ended on December 31, 1019.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
Categories:

Events

1010

By placeEdit

AfricaEdit
  • The Nile river in Egypt freezes over.[1]
AsiaEdit
JapanEdit
AmericasEdit
EuropeEdit

By topicEdit

ArtEdit
LiteratureEdit
TechnologyEdit

1011

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
Middle EastEdit
AsiaEdit
  • Emperor Ichijō abdicates the throne and dies later after a 25-year reign. He is succeeded by his cousin Sanjō as the 67th emperor of Japan.

1012

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
IrelandEdit
ScotlandEdit
Arabian EmpireEdit
MexicoEdit
  • The Tepanec tribe settles on the western region of Lake Texcoco. The lineage starts when the Chichimeca chieftain Acolhua marries Cuetlaxochitzin, daughter of Xolotl, another Chichimeca chieftain.
JapanEdit
  • February – Fujiwara no Kenshi, daughter of the powerful court official Fujiwara no Michinaga, is elevated to Empress Consort (Chūgū). The Emperor's first wife, Fujiwara no Seishi, is also elevated to Empress (Kōgō) at the same time but Michinaga ensures that court officials do not attend her ceremony.
  • August 12 – Death of Ōe no Masahira, husband of poet and former palace lady-in-waiting Akazome Emon, who writes a number of mourning poems to him.
  • Fujiwara no Yorimichi, second son of Fujiwara no Michinaga, marries the daughter of Michinaga's enemy Fujiwara no Kintō, eventually reconciling the families. Another son of Michinaga, Fujiwara no Akinobu, causes scandal by becoming a priest without telling his parents, but they eventually accept his decision.

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1013

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1014

By placeEdit

Byzantine EmpireEdit
EuropeEdit
EnglandEdit
AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1015

By placeEdit

AsiaEdit
EuropeEdit

1016

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
Arabian EmpireEdit
AsiaEdit
  • March 10 – Emperor Sanjō of Japan abdicates the throne after a 5-year reign. He is succeeded by his 7-year-old cousin Go-Ichijō as the 68th emperor of Japan. Fujiwara no Michinaga is appointed regent.
  • Japanese poet Koshikibu no Naishi (lady-in-waiting to Dowager Empress Shōshi) and her husband Fujiwara no Kiminari (son of Michinaga) have a son, but the couple is not accepted because of the social gap between them.[16]

1017

EuropeEdit

EnglandEdit

Arabian EmpireEdit

AfricaEdit

AsiaEdit

  • March – Fujiwara no Michinaga passes the title of regent of Japan (Sesshō) to his eldest son Fujiwara no Yorimichi.
  • September
    • Prince Atsuakira of Japan, eldest son of ex-Emperor Sanjō, having been struck by a skin disease and under intense pressure from Michinaga, resigns the title of Crown Prince in favour of his younger brother, Prince Atsunaga[19] who marries Fujiwara no Kanshi, daughter of Michinaga.
    • Michinaga makes a pilgrimage to the Iwashimizu Shrine in Japan accompanied by many courtiers. The travelers divide themselves amongst 15 boats for a floating trip down the Yotogawa River. One of the vessels overturns and more than 30 people lose their lives.[19]
  • December 24 – Michinaga is granted the honorary title Daijō-daijin of Japan.
  • Rajendra I, ruler of the Chola dynasty (in modern India), conquers Sri Lanka and annexes the island.[20]

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1018

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
AsiaEdit

By topicEdit

ReligionEdit

1019

By placeEdit

EuropeEdit
  • Sviatopolk I dies, and is succeeded by his brother Yaroslav I (the Wise). He becomes, with the support of the Novgorodians and the help of Varangian (Viking) mercenaries, the Grand Prince of Kiev. Yaroslav consolidates the Kievan state, through both cultural and administrative improvements, and military campaigns.[24]
AfricaEdit
AsiaEdit

Significant peopleEdit

BirthsEdit

1010

1011

1012

1013

1014

1015

1016

1017

1018

1019

DeathsEdit

1010

1011

1012

1013

1014

1015

1016

1017

1018

1019

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lamb 2012.
  2. ^ Boissonade 1934.
  3. ^ Norwich 1967.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Palmer & Palmer 1992.
  5. ^ Stenton, Frank. Anglo-Saxon England. pp. 381–384.
  6. ^ Gil, Moshe (1997). A History of Palestine, 634-1099. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 382–384. ISBN 0-521-59984-9.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Williams 2005.
  8. ^ a b Titsingh, Isaac (1834). Nihon Odai Ichiran, ou Annales des empereurs du Japon. Paris: Royal Asiatic Society. p. 155. OCLC 5850691.
  9. ^ Chandler 1989.
  10. ^ Rosenberg 2001.
  11. ^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology, p. 214.
  12. ^ Needham 2008.
  13. ^ Bradbury 2004.
  14. ^ Benvenuti 1985.
  15. ^ Kleinhenz 2010.
  16. ^ "Koshikibu no Naishi", Mypaedia, Hitachi Systems & Services, 2007.
  17. ^ a b Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd; Barrie & Jenkins. pp. 48–49. ISBN 978-0712656160.
  18. ^ Meynier 2010.
  19. ^ a b Titsingh, Isaac (1834). Nihon Odai Ichiran, ou, Annales des empereurs du Japon. Paris: Royal Asiatic Society, Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland. pp. 156–7. OCLC 5850691.
  20. ^ Agnihotri 2010.
  21. ^ Kleinhenz, Christopher, ed. (2010). Medieval Italy: an encyclopedia. Vol. 1. Routledge. ISBN 978-0415939294.
  22. ^ Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN 978-0304357307.
  23. ^ Emery, Anthony (2006). Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales, 1300–1500. Volume 3, Southern England. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-58132-5.
  24. ^ "Yaroslav I (prince of Kiev) - Britannica Online Encyclopedia". Britannica.com. Retrieved 2012-04-07.
  25. ^ "Henry III - Holy Roman emperor". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 17 April 2018.

SourcesEdit