Portal:Bollywood

Introduction

"Bollywood Steps" show from Bristol

Hindi cinema, often known as Bollywood and formerly as Bombay cinema, is the Indian Hindi-language film industry based in Mumbai (formerly Bombay). The term is a portmanteau of "Bombay" and "Hollywood". The industry is related to Cinema of South India and other Indian film industries, making up Indian cinema—the world's largest by number of feature films produced.

In 2017, Indian cinema produced 1,986 feature films, with Bollywood as its largest filmmaker, producing 364 Hindi films the same year. Bollywood represents 43 percent of Indian net box-office revenue; Tamil and Telugu cinema represent 36 percent, and the remaining regional cinema constituted 21 percent in 2014. Bollywood is one of the largest centres of film production in the world. In 2001 ticket sales, Indian cinema (including Bollywood) reportedly sold an estimated 3.6 billion tickets worldwide, compared to Hollywood's 2.6 billion tickets sold. Bollywood films tend to use vernacular Hindustani, mutually intelligible by people who self-identify as speaking either Hindi or Urdu, and modern Bollywood movies increasingly incorporate elements of Hinglish.

The most popular commercial genre in Bollywood since the 1970s has been the masala film, which freely mixes different genres including action, comedy, romance, drama and melodrama along with musical numbers. Masala films generally fall under the musical film genre, of which Indian cinema has been the largest producer since the 1960s when it exceeded the American film industry's total musical output after musical films declined in the West; the first Indian musical talkie was Alam Ara (1931), several years after the first Hollywood musical talkie The Jazz Singer (1927). Alongside commercial masala films, a distinctive genre of art films known as parallel cinema has also existed, presenting realistic content and avoidance of musical numbers. In more recent years, the distinction between commercial masala and parallel cinema has been gradually blurring, with an increasing number of mainstream films adopting the conventions which were once strictly associated with parallel cinema. (Full article...)

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Indian composer A.R. Rahman
"Jai Ho" is a song composed by Indian composer A. R. Rahman (pictured) for the soundtrack to Subhash Ghai's 2008 film Yuvvraaj. Ghai, who suggested Rahman use the words "jai ho" in a song, thought it was "too subtle and soft" for inclusion in the film. Rahman and Gulzar, who co-wrote the lyrics to the song, felt that the song had "immense potential", so when Danny Boyle, the director of the 2008 film Slumdog Millionaire, approached Rahman to compose its soundtrack, Rahman used the song for it. "Jai Ho" accompanies a choreographed dance sequence at the end credits of Slumdog Millionaire. The song features vocals from Sukhvinder Singh, Mahalaxmi Iyer and Vijay Prakash in three Indian languages. Videos were posted on YouTube of people covering and remixing the song, as well as doing the "Jai Ho" dance featured in the film. "Jai Ho" received universally favorable reviews from music critics. The song won an Academy Award for Best Original Song and a Grammy Award. American girl group The Pussycat Dolls recorded an English interpretation of "Jai Ho". Entitled "Jai Ho! (You Are My Destiny)", and credited to "A. R. Rahman and the Pussycat Dolls featuring Nicole Scherzinger", the song appeared on the re-release of the group's second studio album Doll Domination (2008).

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Selected biography

Kareena2.jpg
Kareena Kapoor (born 21 September 1980) is an Indian actress who appears in Bollywood films. During her career, Kapoor has received six Filmfare Awards out of nine nominations, and has been noted for her performances in a range of film genres. Born into a family of actors, Kapoor faced the media spotlight from a very young age but did not make her acting début until the 2000 film Refugee. Her melodrama Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Gham... became India's highest-grossing film in the overseas market in 2001 and remains one of her biggest commercial successes to date. After receiving negative reviews for a series of repetitive roles, Kapoor accepted more demanding parts in order to avoid being typecast, and was consequently recognized by critics for displaying greater versatility as an actress. Her portrayal of a sex worker in Chameli (2004) proved to be the turning point in her career. The film (and Kapoor's performance) opened to predominantly positive reviews by critics, and eventually garnered her the Filmfare Special Performance Award. In 2007, Kapoor received the Filmfare Award for Best Actress for her performance in Jab We Met. She went on to play the lead female role in the drama 3 Idiots (2009), which became the highest-grossing Bollywood film of all time at the time of its release.

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A scene from film, Raja Harishchandra, 1913.jpg
Credit: Dadasaheb Phalke
A still of a scene from the first full-length silent feature film in India, Raja Harishchandra. The film was released in 1913, had no sound or music and had men playing women's roles.

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Cleanup needed
Bot-generated cleanup listingHindi films and plagiarismRamoji Film CityFilmfare AwardsIIFA AwardsIIFANaam (1986 film)Anand BakshiAjay DevganN. T. Rama Rao Jr.Rashmika Mandanna
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List of missing Indian Films (see also lists of Indian films for redlinks) • Beary Cinema
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Draft articles: Tulu cinemaAnahat (film)Prakash JhaCentral Board of Film CertificationFilmfare Awards SouthKerala Film Critics Association AwardsAmitabh BachchanGabbar Singh Sanjay DuttHindustan Photo FilmsSanskrit cinema
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