Mohabbatein

Mohabbatein (transl.Love Stories) is a 2000 Indian Hindi-language romantic drama film that was written and directed by Aditya Chopra and produced by Yash Chopra under the banner of Yash Raj Films. The film stars Amitabh Bachchan, Shah Rukh Khan, and Aishwarya Rai, and debuting actors Uday Chopra, Shamita Shetty, Jugal Hansraj, Kim Sharma, Jimmy Shergill, and Preeti Jhangiani. It narrates the story of Narayan (Bachchan), the strict principal of Gurukul college whose daughter Megha (Rai), commits suicide after he opposes her relationship with Raj (Khan), a music teacher at the college.

Mohabbatein
Mohabbatein.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byAditya Chopra
Written byAditya Chopra
Produced byYash Chopra
Starring
CinematographyManmohan Singh
Edited byV. Karnik
Music byJatin–Lalit
Production
company
Release date
27 October 2000
Running time
215 minutes[1]
CountryIndia
LanguageHindi
Budget130–190 million[a]
Box office900.1 million[3]

The film was originally planned to be Aditya Chopra's directorial debut but it was his second film after Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge (1995). Is themes were inspired by those from 1989 American coming-of-age drama Dead Poets Society. Produced on a budget more than 100 million (US$1.3 million), the principal photography of Mohabbatein, which was filmed in the United Kingdom, was handled by Manmohan Singh between October 1999 and late 2000. Sharmishta Roy and Karan Johar built the sets and designed the costumes, respectively. The duo Jatin–Lalit composed its music while Anand Bakshi wrote the lyrics.

Mohabbatein was released on 27 October 2000 and received widespread acclaim from critics, with Bachchan's and Khan's garnering the most praise. With a total gross of 900.1 million (US$12 million), the film was declared as a commercial success and became the highest-grossing Indian film of the year. It won four trophies at the 46th Filmfare Awards, including Best Actor – Critics (Khan) and Best Supporting Actor (Bachchan). It also received three Bollywood Movie Awards, four International Indian Film Academy Awards, one Screen Award, and two Zee Cine Awards.

PlotEdit

Narayan has been the strict principal of Gurukul, a prestigious all-boys college, for 25 years. Narayan believes in bringing the best out of his students by emphasizing honour, tradition, and discipline. He disdains fun and is particularly intolerant of romance and threatens to expel any student who is caught having a romantic affair. Despite these rules, three Gurukul students—Sameer, Vicky, and Karan—fall in love. Sameer falls for Sanjana, his childhood friend; Vicky is attracted to Ishika, a student at the neighbouring all-girls college; and Karan is infatuated with Kiran, a young widow whom Karan sees alone one night in a train station.

Narayan hires Raj as Gurukul's new music teacher. Raj believes in the power of love and decides to spread love throughout Gurukul. He sympathizes with the predicaments of Sameer, Vicky, and Karan, and encourages them to persist and stay loyal to their loves. Raj tells the three students he had a special love himself and that although she is dead, he imagines she accompanies him every day. One day, as part of his plan, Raj throws a party, to which he invites the students of the all-girls college. Narayan discovers the party and threatens to dismiss Raj. At this point, Raj reveals he had been a student at Gurukul over a decade earlier and that he had fallen in love with Megha, Narayan's only daughter. Narayan had summarily expelled Raj from the college and the distraught Megha had committed suicide. Raj returns to Gurukul to honour Megha's memory by reversing the college's zero-tolerance policy on romance; he promises he will fill the school with love and that Narayan will be unable to stop it. Narayan is shocked; he takes this as a challenge and allows Raj to remain.

Sameer, Vicky, and Karan are able to win over Sanjana, Ishika, and Kiran, respectively, but Narayan retaliates by tightening the college's rules. The student body, however, encouraged by Raj, continues to defy the rules and in a final effort to preserve the school atmosphere he has built up for 25 years, Narayan expels the three students. Raj speaks up on their behalf, stating they did nothing wrong by falling in love and accusing Narayan of causing his own daughter's death with his intolerance of love. Raj also says he feels Narayan lost the challenge because his daughter left him and now Raj, who considered Narayan an elder, is leaving him as well. Raj's words hurt Narayan, who realizes his strict no-romance policy is misguided. Narayan apologizes to the student body, resigns as principal of Gurukul, and nominates Raj as his successor. Raj accepts and reconciles with Narayan.

CastEdit

The cast is listed below:[4][5]

ProductionEdit

"It was not easy at all but I wanted faces which were not seen every Friday. I wanted fresh faces, talented faces, naturally young faces, basically youngsters who would be willing to learn, faces who could understand the truth about what this thing they called Mohabbatein was all about and more than any thing else I wanted them to understand every minute detail of the script as conceived by me."

 —Aditya Chopra on the film's casting[6]

Before the production of the romantic musical Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge (1995)—one of the highest-grossing films and the longest-running film in Indian cinema history—Aditya Chopra had started to write Mohabbatein to make his directorial debut.[7] Chopra felt Mohabbatein's subject matter was too mature, making Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge his first film as a director and Mohabbatein his second.[6][8] Wanting his next film to have different themes, he conceived Mohabbatein as a thriller but changed his mind and decided to make another romantic film. He stated, "I realized that there is something in that story that keeps drawing me to it, so one day I just shut my thriller file and casually picked up my [...] Mohabbatein file—that one simple action decided my second film for me".[9]

Aditya Chopra started to write Mohabbatein after the release of Dil To Pagal Hai (1997)—he wanted it to be about more than just romantic stories.[9] According to the Encyclopaedia of Hindi Cinema, the film was inspired by the 1989 American coming-of-age drama Dead Poets Society.[10] Chopra then narrated Mohabbatein to his father Yash Chopra, who was impressed by it; the latter also produced the film under his banner Yash Raj Films. In a Screen interview, Yash Chopra described it as "a modern film, a film about today and it has all the ingredients of entertainment for people of all ages".[6] He said the film shows the honour of Indian traditions and their values, adding, "On the whole Aditya has made an honest film, honest to God and honest to the audience who has given us so much".[6] The project was announced in June 1999 on Yash Raj Films' website.[11]

Aditya Chopra told his father he would cast Amitabh Bachchan, Shah Rukh Khan, and Aishwarya Rai Bachchan in the lead roles, saying he could not think of other suitable actors; the three immediately accepted.[6] Mohabbatein is Khan's second collaboration with Rai after the 2000 drama Josh and the first with Bachchan.[12][13] Aditya Chopra tried to offer the role of Megha to Kajol, who declined it because of her marriage.[14] Bachchan, playing Narayan, felt the part was his best role after Deewaar (1975), and said he only accepted the part because of "the fantastic script" by Aditya Chopra, whom he called "the little boy".[6] To complete the casting, Chopra sought six new actors; three male and three female. Aditya's brother Uday Chopra wanted to make his acting debut in the film; Aditya Chopra and his assistants travelled across India to find the other five newcomers; he cast Shamita Shetty, Jugal Hansraj, Kim Sharma, Jimmy Shergill, and Preeti Jhangiani. A gymnasium was built specifically for their training before filming began.[6] Amrish Puri, Shefali Shah, and Helen made special appearances.[4] Aditya Chopra also wrote the film's dialogue.[15]

The principal photography of Mohabbatein was handled by Manmohan Singh and commenced on 25 October 1999, taking place in the United Kingdom.[16][17] Karan Johar designed the costumes for Bachchan and Khan while Manish Malhotra designed them for Rai.[6] Farah Khan was the choreographer.[15] Sharmishta Roy, a frequent collaborator with Yash Raj Films, served as the art director.[4] When asked by Shilpa Bharatan-Iyer of Rediff.com, Roy described the film as a "learning experience"; she used many stones for Narayan's office sets and went to Lohar Chawl to buy several additional properties. Roy said she had a good rapport with Aditya Chopra and that the film's production gave her many challenges; "Look, every day, I put up houses. The challenge is in "individualising", in "personalising" each house to suit the script and the characters in the narrative."[18] Roy designed 13 or 14 sets for the film.[18] Filming ended between August and September 2000;[19] it was edited by V. Karnik, and Anuj Mathur and Kunal Mehta were the film's sound designers.[4][15]

MusicEdit

Mohabbatein
Soundtrack album by
Released21 January 2000
GenreFeature-film soundtrack
Length50:52
LabelYRF Music
ProducerJatin–Lalit
Jatin–Lalit chronology
Dhai Akshar Prem Ke
(2000)
Mohabbatein
(2000)
Phir Bhi Dil Hai Hindustani
(2000)

The duo Jatin–Lalit composed Mohabbatein's soundtrack and the lyrics were written by Anand Bakshi.[20] The vocals were performed by the debutantes Ishaan, Manohar Shetty, Pritha Mazumdar, Shweta Pandit, Sonali Bhatawdekar, and Udhbhav. Lalit told Rediff.com he thought it was "a good idea to have fresh voices for the newcomers so that it also helps the album sound fresh", and said he and Jatin experienced difficulty while suiting their voices. Lata Mangeshkar, Udit Narayan, Shah Rukh Khan, and Jaspinder Narula also provided vocals.[21] The film's soundtrack album has seven original songs and two background scores, and was released on 21 January 2000 by Yash Raj Films' subsidiary YRF Music.[20][22] In early November, Yash Chopra sold its rights to HMV and earned an advance of 75 million (US$1.0 million).[23]

Critical response to the soundtrack of Mohabbatein was mediocre.[24] According to Screen, "Jatin-Lalit's music, though not chartbuster stuff, is melodious and situational. It grows on you as you watch the film."[25] Ratna Malay of Bollywood Hungama called it "a typical Yash Chopra kind with a mixture" of Dil To Pagal Hai.[26] Writing for Planet Bollywood, Avinash Ramchandani described it as "an outstanding album with several new singers making a splendid debut, as well as a commendable job by Jatin-Lalit, and brilliant lyrics by Anand Bakshi"[27] but Hindustan Times called it "[absolutely] dud".[28] According to the film-trade website Box Office India, the soundtrack album sold five million copies and became the highest-selling Bollywood soundtrack of the year.[29] Jatin–Lalit received a nomination for the Best Music Director in the 46th iteration of the Filmfare Awards,[30] and were also nominated in the same category at the Bollywood Movie Awards and Screen Awards.[31][32]

Mohabbatein (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)[20]
No.TitleSinger(s)Length
1."Humko Humise Chura Lo"Lata Mangeshkar, Udit Narayan7:53
2."Chalte Chalte" (Part 1)Ishaan, Manohar Shetty, Pritha Mazumdar, Shweta Pandit, Sonali Bhatawdekar, Udhbhav7:38
3."Pairon Mein Bandhan Hai"Ishaan, Manohar Shetty, Pritha Mazumdar, Shweta Pandit, Sonali Bhatawdekar, Udhbhav7:01
4."Aankhein Khuli"Ishaan, Lata Mangeshkar, Manohar Shetty, Pritha Mazumdar, Shah Rukh Khan, Shweta Pandit, Sonali Bhatawdekar, Udhbhav, Udit Narayan7:02
5."Soni Soni"Ishaan, Jaspinder Narula, Manohar Shetty, Pritha Mazumdar, Shweta Pandit, Sonali Bhatawdekar, Udhbhav, Udit Narayan9:07
6."Chalte Chalte" (Part 2)Manohar Shetty, Pritha Mazumdar, Shweta Pandit, Sonali Bhatawdekar, Udhbhav2:49
7."Zinda Rehti Hain Mohabbatein"Udit Narayan, Lata Mangeshkar2:23
8."Mohabbatein Love Themes" (Instrumental) 2:17
9."Rhythms of Mohabbatein" (Instrumental) 3:56
Total length:50:52

ReleaseEdit

Mohabbatein was one of the most anticipated films of the year and the audience's expectations were high.[33] On 8 October 2000, a special screening for the film in Film City was organized with Aditya Chopra, Bachchan and his son Abhishek Bachchan, Shah Rukh Khan and his wife Gauri Khan, and Johar in attendance.[34] The film was released theatrically on 27 October during the Diwali celebrations; its release clashed with those of Vidhu Vinod Chopra's thriller Mission Kashmir and K. S. Ravikumar's comedy-drama Thenali.[33] Due to its lengthy running time, theatres screened three shows daily rather than four.[1]

Mohabbatein was opened on 315 screens across India and grossed 11.9 million (US$160,000) on the first day. The film collected 706.2 million (US$9.4 million) in India and $4.2 million overseas.[3] Box Office India estimated the film's total gross to be 900.1 million (US$12 million), making it the highest-grossing Indian film of the year.[3][35] It ran at theatres for over 175 days, becoming a silver jubilee film.[36][b] Mohabbatein was released on DVD in a double-disc pack on 20 November in all regions.[39] It has been available for streaming on Amazon Prime Video and Apple TV+ since 18 November 2016.[40]

Critical receptionEdit

Mohabbatein received widespread critical acclaim; Amitabh Bachchan's and Shah Rukh Khan's performances gained the most attention.[1] Savera R. Someshwar of Rediff.com commented the film "is a mish-mash alright. But it is also a successful, feelgood film." She described both actors as "the two pillars on which this film is built and each time they come face-to-face, there is this expectant hush".[41] Taran Adarsh of Bollywood Hungama rated the film three stars out of five, praising Aditya Chopra for handling the confrontation sequences between the two "with aplomb". He added the director "is at his best", saying, "Not once do you feel that the writer in Chopra has tilted on any one side".[42] Vinayak Chakravorty concluded, "Clearly, Aditya Chopra faces a downhill task this time around. Shorn of a solid script, bereft of impressive treatment and lacking any directorial credibility to hold his [...] mega dream [...] Mohabbatein is a veritable lesson to any budding filmmaker on how not to make a film".[28] Zee Next's Vinaya Hagde gave a scathing review of the film, calling it "dumb", and saying Kher and Singh were "totally wasted".[43]

Reviewing Mohabbatein for The Hindu, Savitha Padmanabhan criticized the film's duration and the way the confrontation sequences between Bachchan and Khan "are always interrupted by the love stories of the teenyboppers"[44] but Filmfare's anonymous reviewer appreciated them for "[excelling] in their respective roles". Nikhat Kazmi called the film the "inglorious uncertainties of cinema" and Khalid Mohamed wrote, "Back in the romantic mode, Aditya Chopra's Mohabbatein is indeed like a rich, multi-layered, vibgyor cake. But frankly, only a few slices tickle the taste-buds."[24] Suman Tarafdar from Filmfare said most of the cast members "look so unconvinced about their roles and perform accordingly".[15] Screen said Aditya Chopra's "untiring efforts are visible in every frame and his mastery over screenplay is evident throughout the first half".[25] Comparing the film with Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge in his review for India Today, Dinesh Raheja said Mohabbatein "has too many diverse strands and in a bid to avoid getting knotted up in them", and considered the story is "disappointingly pat and oversimplified".[45]

AccoladesEdit

Award Date of ceremony[c] Category Recipient(s) Result Ref.
Bollywood Movie Awards 28 April 2001 Best Film Mohabbatein Nominated [31]
[46]
[47]
Best Director Aditya Chopra Nominated
Best Actor Shah Rukh Khan Nominated
Best Actor – Critics Amitabh Bachchan Won
Best Comedian Anupam Kher Nominated
Best Debut – Male Uday Chopra Nominated
Best Music Director Jatin–Lalit Nominated
Best Lyricist Anand Bakshi (for "Humko Humise Chura Lo") Nominated
Best Story Aditya Chopra Won
Best Screenplay Won
Best Costume Designer Karan Johar, Manish Malhotra Nominated
Best Cinematography Manmohan Singh Nominated
Filmfare Awards 17 February 2001 Best Film Mohabbatein Nominated [30]
[48]
[49]
Best Director Aditya Chopra Nominated
Best Actor Shah Rukh Khan Nominated
Best Actor – Critics Won
Best Supporting Actor Amitabh Bachchan Won
Best Supporting Actress Aishwarya Rai Nominated
Best Music Director Jatin–Lalit Nominated
Best Lyricist Anand Bakshi (for "Humko Humise Chura Lo") Nominated
Best Sound Recording Anuj Mathur, Kunal Mehta Won
International Indian Film Academy Awards 16 June 2001 Best Film Mohabbatein Nominated [49]
[50]
[51]
Best Director Aditya Chopra Nominated
Best Actor Shah Rukh Khan Nominated
Best Supporting Actor Amitabh Bachchan Won
Best Performance in a Comic Role Anupam Kher Nominated
Archana Puran Singh Nominated
Best Story Aditya Chopra Won
Best Dialogue Won
Best Costume Design Karan Johar, Manish Malhotra Won
Sansui Viewer's Choice Movie Awards 3 June 2001 Best Actor Shah Rukh Khan Won [49]
[52]
Best Supporting Actor Amitabh Bachchan Won
Best Actor in a Comic Role Anupam Kher Won
Best Dialogue Aditya Chopra Won
Best Cinematography Manmohan Singh Won
Screen Awards 20 January 2001 Best Film Mohabbatein Nominated [53]
[54]
[55]
Best Director Aditya Chopra Nominated
Best Actor Shah Rukh Khan Nominated
Best Supporting Actor Amitabh Bachchan Nominated
Best Music Director Jatin–Lalit Nominated
Best Lyricist Anand Bakshi (for "Humko Humise Chura Lo") Won
Best Dialogue Aditya Chopra Nominated
Best Cinematography Manmohan Singh Nominated
Best Art Direction Sharmishta Roy Nominated
Best Choreography Farah Khan (for "Pairon Mein Bandhan Hai") Nominated
Best Male Debut Uday Chopra Nominated
Zee Cine Awards 3 March 2001 Best Art Direction Sharmishta Roy Won [56]
Best Costume Design Karan Johar, Manish Malhotra Won

NotesEdit

  1. ^ India Today reported that Mohabbatein had a budget of 130 million (US$1.7 million),[2] while the film-trade website Box Office India said that the number was 190 million (US$2.5 million).[3]
  2. ^ A silver jubilee film is one that completes a theatrical run of 25 weeks or 175 days.[37][38]
  3. ^ Date is linked to the article about the awards held that year, wherever possible.

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit